Infectious diseases of the hepatobiliary system
This review will concentrate on commonly encountered infectious diseases in biopsy practice and will consider three scenarios: Firstly, the most frequent, where the biopsy arrives with the infectious disease stated on the request form. Secondly, where the patient has a risk factor placing infectious diseases high in the differential diagnosis and, thirdly, where infection is one of several possible aetiologies when a liver biopsy shows a particular pattern of inflammation. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - October 22, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Rachel Mary Brown Tags: Mini-symposium: Infectious diseases pathology Source Type: research

Echinococcus multilocularis infection presenting clinically as cholangiocarcinoma
We report a case of alveolar echinococcosis that presented clinically as a cholangiocarcinoma. At histology, vesicles unusually contained protoscoleces, a feature more commonly seen in cases of Echinococcus granulosus. PCR confirmed the organism as E. multilocularis, avoiding misdiagnosis and subsequent mismanagement. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - October 20, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Caroline A. Young, Alyn L. Cratchley, Penny Lewthwaite, Peter Chiodini, Judith I. Wyatt Tags: Short case Source Type: research

Infectious disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract (excluding Helicobacter pylori)
The upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including the oesophagus, stomach and small intestine, is host to numerous microorganisms. Some reflect gastrointestinal involvement by systemic disease, but others are primary digestive disorders that first present at GI sites. This review focuses on the most common infectious disorders of the upper GI tract encountered in general surgical pathology practice, including viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic organisms. Clinical and histological features are discussed, as well as useful ancillary diagnostic techniques. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - October 19, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Nicole C. Panarelli, Laura W. Lamps Tags: Mini-symposium: Infectious diseases pathology Source Type: research

The practice of cytopathology during the era of COVID-19: challenges and changes
This paper reviews the challenges faced by cytology laboratories during the COVID-19 pandemic. Various safety guidelines regarding collection, handling, transport and sampling in cytology laboratory are presented. A brief literature overview of adapted changes regarding new safety techniques, processing, sampling techniques implemented by the cytology laboratories in the this part of the world is presented. The use of cytology in COVID-19 patients is discussed. The authors have also tried to present the challenges and changes faced for training and education during this time. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - October 12, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Swikrity Upadhyay Baskota, Ashish Chandra, Paul Cross Source Type: research

Immunohistochemistry for prediction of response to immunotherapy
Predicting response of tumours to immune-oncology (IO) drugs targeting the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)/programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint is currently limited to assessing PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Much has been learned in the last few years about this uniquely challenging application of IHC and, in this short review, we assess its strengths and weaknesses, covering pre-analytics, analytics and post-analytics in the context of the complex underlying biology. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - September 29, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Alexander Haragan, John R. Gosney Tags: Mini-symposium: Techniques in histopathology Source Type: research

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Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - September 24, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Lighting up an uncommon diagnosis
We report a case of lichen planus pemphigoides, a very rare entity within this group of dermatoses, which shows overlapping features of lichen planus and bullous pemphigoid. We discuss the value of pattern-based morphologic assessment and clinical correlation, along with the vital role of immunofluorescence in arriving at the correct diagnosis. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - September 13, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: John Connelly, Asok Biswas Tags: Short case Source Type: research

Application of DNA- and RNA-based sequencing techniques to tumour tissue samples in the clinical laboratory
Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have become an indispensable tool within the research field driving genomic discoveries and furthering our understanding of the genomic changes that lead to human disease. NGS technologies have great potential to provide invaluable genomic data that can be used to improve clinical diagnosis and the delivery of precision medicine. Over the past decade NGS has translated into the clinical setting for both hereditary and somatic indications. Whilst it has great potential in the clinic, the application of this technology for cancer faces a number of challenges, both technical and l...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - September 11, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Matthew Smith, Oluwatosin Taiwo Tags: Mini-symposium: Techniques in histopathology Source Type: research

In situ hybridisation in tissue sections
The identification of recurrent tumour-specific chromosomal abnormalities, including rearrangements and copy number changes, has shown increasingly important diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic implications. In surgical pathology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a quick and reliable method for the detection of many genetics aberrations, and can be applied to a variety of specimens including formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues; as such, it has been successfully incorporated into diagnostic practice for lymphomas, mesenchymal and other solid tumours. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - September 11, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Laura Chiecchio Tags: Mini-symposium: Techniques in histopathology Source Type: research

Artificial intelligence in pathology: an overview
Artificial intelligence (AI) is at the forefront of modern technology and emerging uses within the healthcare sector are now being realised. Pathology will be a key area where the impact of AI will be felt. With more and more laboratories making the transition to digital pathology this will provide the key infrastructure in which to deploy these tools and their use will start to become a reality in diagnostic practice. The potential of AI in pathology is to create image analysis tools which could either be used for diagnostic support or to derive novel insights into disease biology, in addition to those achievable with a h...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - September 9, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Benjamin Moxley-Wyles, Richard Colling, Clare Verrill Tags: Mini-symposium: Techniques in histopathology Source Type: research

Epithelioid haemangioendothelioma of bone
Epithelioid haemangioendothelioma (EHE) of bone often presents as a multifocal tumour with an affinity for cortical bone. Therefore, pathological fractures are common at presentation. They can be confused initially for metastatic carcinoma, given their potential to express cytokeratins. However, the diagnosis can now be clarified with to the discovery of a unique translocation that is found in the majority of EHE tumours. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - September 1, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Katherine Humphris, Amy Charter, Kate Marks, William Merchant Tags: Short case Source Type: research

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(Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 31, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Histopathology of fibro-osseous and cystic tumors of bone
Fibro-osseous and cystic tumors are some of the more common tumors encountered in bone pathology. Although there is significant histologic overlap, fibro-osseous tumors of bone have distinct clinical, radiologic and pathogenetic features. Similarly, cystic lesions have characteristic radiologic and pathologic features that help distinguish them from tumor of bone that can have secondarily cystic components. More recently, specific genetic abnormalities have been identified in a subset of fibro-osseous and cystic tumors, such as fibrous dysplasia and aneurysmal bone cyst. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 19, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Ivan Chebib, Connie Y. Chang, Santiago Lozano-Calderon, G Petur Nielsen Tags: Mini-symposium: Bone pathology Source Type: research

An update on the pathology of extranodal T-cell lymphomas
Non-cutaneous extranodal NK/T cell lymphoproliferations constitute a heterogenous group of rare neoplasms, occurring primarily in the gastro-intestinal tract, nasal area, spleen and liver. Besides primarily extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma entities – i.e. extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma, primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas and NK/T-cell lymphoproliferations of the gastrointestinal tract, and breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma – extranodal tissues may also be involved by T-cell leukemias, o r other entities usually presenting as nodal diseases. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 17, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Dina Milowich, Laurence de Leval Tags: Mini-symposium: Lymphoreticular pathology Source Type: research

Advances in the assessment of T-cell clonality
The diagnosis of T-cell lymphomas is often more challenging than that of B-cell lymphomas and can be difficult even for monospecialised haematopathologists. Their identification involves histomorphological assessment and the recognition of aberrant immunophenotypes but may additionally require polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis of T-cell receptor (TR) gene rearrangements (clonality analysis). TR gene rearrangements occur naturally during T-cell development, acting as a unique barcode for each cell: in neoplastic proliferations subsets of these barcodes become expanded and can therefore be detected as clonal pop...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 10, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Kate Davies, Joy Staniforth, William Haowei Xie, Hongxiang Liu, Maryam Salimi, Graham Ogg, Elizabeth Soilleux Tags: Mini-symposium: Haematopathology Source Type: research

Clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of chondrogenic tumours
Chondrogenic or cartilaginous tumours represent the most common bone tumours and can be diagnostically challenging especially on scarce biopsy material. As morphologically they may overlap, correlation between radiological and pathological findings and discussion in a multidisciplinary tumour board is mandatory for a final diagnosis. The aim of this review is to discuss clinical and pathological features that are important in the differential diagnosis of benign (chondromesenchymal hamartoma of chest wall, osteochondroma, enchondroma, periosteal chondroma) and intermediate (synovial chondromatosis, central or secondary per...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 10, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Arjen H.G. Cleven, Judith V.M.G. Bov ée Tags: Mini-symposium: Bone pathology Source Type: research

Giant cell-rich lesions of bone
Giant cell-rich bone lesions comprize heterogeneous neoplastic and non-neoplastic disorders with diverse clinical, radiological and pathological presentations. They are characterized by the presence of conspicuous osteoclast-type giant cells as a component of the presenting entity. Correlation with imaging, age and location of the lesion is essential to render an accurate diagnosis. Pathological diagnosis ultimately dictates the behavior and direct the management of these lesions. Both benign and malignant tumors of bone can elaborate an osteoclast-rich giant cell response and the distribution of giant cells vary with the ...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 9, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Meera Hameed Tags: Mini-symposium: Bone pathology Source Type: research

Multiplex immunohistochemistry in lymphoma pathology: a research tool for study of the immune microenvironment
Tissue analysis of lymphoproliferative disease in the clinical or research settings demands multiple immunohistochemistry with the assessment of co-localisation of expression of markers. Multiplex immunohistochemistry (MIHC) is ideally suited to this task, enabling simultaneous assessment of a number of markers on a single section, thus reducing interpretive errors and preserving tissue for further analyses. The range of current and emerging MIHC platforms offer an opportunity to gain unprecedented insight into the cellular and immunological milieu of lymphoproliferative disease and have been applied in research. (Source: ...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 4, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Matthew Pugh, Ayse U. Akarka, Kelly Hunter, Stefan Dojcinov, Teresa Marafioti Tags: Mini-symposium: Lymphoreticular pathology Source Type: research

An unusual case of scrotal plexiform hypomelanotic cellular blue naevus in a child
We report a case of amelanotic/hypomelanotic variant of CBN that presented as a painless scrotal swelling in a child. We review the literature on amelanotic/hypomelanotic CBN, the key histological features and important differential diagnoses. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - August 3, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Mohammad Haini, Neil Sebire, Eduardo Calonje, Cyril Fisher, Michael Ashworth Tags: Mini-symposium: Short case Source Type: research

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(Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - July 31, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

An approach to diagnosis in arthroplasty specimens
Optimal examination of arthroplasty specimens requires careful assessment of the macroscopic findings and in many cases the microscopic findings only serve to confirm the findings, occasionally adding further data. With optimized gross and microscopic examination, the discrepancy rate between preoperative clinical and radiological diagnosis and pathological is high (up to 19%). Careful macroscopic assessment is a fundamental step which is often poorly executed. Inadequate or inappropriate sectioning inevitably misses key features in some cases. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - July 28, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: S Fiona Bonar Tags: Mini-symposium: Bone pathology Source Type: research

Molecular deconstruction of a biphasic malignant skin tumour
We present the case of a diagnostically challenging biphasic cutaneous melanoma. We show how tumour microdissection and next generation sequencing revealed the molecular signature allowing confirmation of the diagnosis. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - July 21, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Joy Ursula Lauren Staniforth, James Yiu Hon Chan, Olivier Thierry Giger Tags: Mini-symposium: Short case Source Type: research

Pathology of primary splenic B-cell lymphomas: a review
Splenic B-cell lymphomas comprise a heterogeneous group of entities that either arise in or show a conspicuous involvement of the spleen, usually accompanied by bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement. The lack of lymphoid tissue available for diagnosis due to the decrease in splenectomies is a challenge for the hematopathologist for the correct classification. The current WHO classification recognizes five distinct entities which are systematically reviewed for the practising pathologist. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - July 19, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Marco B ühler, Estella Matutes, Maria Rozman, Elías Campo Tags: Mini-symposium: Lymphoreticular pathology Source Type: research

Burkitt-like lymphoma with 11q aberration
We report a case of BLL-11q in a 33-year-old male with an ileocaecal mass and associated abdominal lymphadenopathy. Microscopy showed tumour morphology and immunoprofile in keeping with Burkitt lymphoma, however, no MYC rearrangement was detected and instead 11q aberration was found on FISH analysis. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - July 18, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Alice C. Westwood, Hebah Ali Tags: Mini-symposium: Short case Source Type: research

Differential diagnosis of aggressive neoplasms with plasmablastic and late post-follicular differentiation
Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a clinicopathological entity with a spectrum of epidemiological, clinical, morphological, phenotypic and genetic features. However, plasmablastic features (PB/F) also define other B-cell neoplasms including ALK positive large B-cell lymphoma, primary effusion lymphoma, HHV8 positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and plasmablastic myeloma, which, respectively, also have other characteristic clinical, and pathological determinants. In addition, late post follicular B-cell differentiation with partial plasma cell phenotypes can be variably encountered in EBV associated B-cell lymphomas and diff...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - July 17, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Gareth Leopold, Snjezana Dotlic, Ali Mahdi, Matthew Pugh, Stefan Dojcinov Tags: Mini-symposium: Lymphoreticular pathology Source Type: research

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(Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - June 30, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

What has post-mortem computed tomography even done for forensic pathology?
This review considers how cross-sectional imaging, principally but not exclusively, post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) can and is used in forensic pathology practice today. It considers the origin of forensic radiology and the introduction of PMCT and questions the invasive autopsy as the gold standard for death investigation. It also considers, in broad terms, the role of cross sectional imaging in the four investigative areas of who, where, when and how a person came by their death. It summarises with a view where we may go next. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - June 25, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Guy N. Rutty Tags: Mini-symposium: Cardiothoracic pathology and virtual autopsy Source Type: research

Daily application of post-mortem computed tomography digital autopsy in a public mortuary
The digital autopsy has gained increasing attention in the past decade as post mortem computed tomography has become more widely available. Whether conducted with, or without, radiographic contrast, digital autopsies have been shown to be a valuable adjunct to invasive examinations in the investigation of natural and unnatural deaths. This radiology investigation has the potential to reduce the number of full invasive autopsies performed, allowing for more targeted, or limited, invasive examinations. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - June 17, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Julian Lindsay Burton, Panagiota Kitsanta Tags: Mini-symposium: Cardiothoracic pathology and virtual autopsy Source Type: research

The Lausanne forensic pathology approach to post-mortem imaging for natural and non-natural deaths
Post-mortem imaging by computed tomography (PMCT) and post-mortem CT angiography (PMCTA) are used routinely in forensic practice as components to the autopsy. PMCT is efficient for gas detection, foreign body visualization and skeleton analysis. Various parameters can lead to the indication for contrast agent injection. Contrast injection into the vascular system can overcome the disadvantages of non-contrast PMCT by visualization of solid organ parenchyma and vessels. This can also assist the conventional autopsy, allowing one to investigate the vascular system. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - June 16, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Virginie Magnin, Silke Grabherr, Katarzyna Michaud Tags: Mini-symposium: Cardiothoracic pathology and virtual autopsy Source Type: research

An overview of COVID-19 for diagnostic pathologists: clinicopathological correlation and diagnostic techniques
The emergence of COVID-19 as a global pandemic has led to a rapid focus on understanding its pathobiology. The constellation of clinical, histological and laboratory findings seen in these patients is similar to other forms of viral pneumonia, but somewhat distinctive aspects exist which may raise the index of suspicion for this disease. The pathological findings are not limited to the respiratory system; cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities have also been described. Establishing a link between the clinical features and macroscopic and microscopic findings is not only important for the practicing autops...
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - June 6, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Abhisek Ghosh, Richard Colling Source Type: research

The challenges of patients with complex comorbidity: it's all in the history
We present an autopsy case highlighting the challenges of post mortem in patients with complex comorbidity. The importance of reviewing investigations, previous results and clinical history is emphasised and important tips for trainees are discussed. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 29, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Kathryn Griffin Tags: Mini-symposium: Cardiothoracic pathology and virtual autopsy Source Type: research

Pathological and molecular aspects of urothelial carcinomas
Bladder cancer diagnosis still relies mainly on morphologic/classical pathology, which gives quickly the most important parameters needed, such as stage, grade and the presence of bad prognosticators (lymphovascular invasion, carcinoma in situ, variant histology). During the last 8 years, much progress has been made from a molecular point of view. Much new evidence has allowed us to gain deeper insight into not only the development of bladder cancer but also its complexity, and is leading us to potential new ways of treatment. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 28, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Eva Comp érat Tags: Mini-symposium: Nephrourology Source Type: research

Teaching and examining for post-mortem CT-scanned autopsies
The traditional style of autopsy teaching and training requires adaptation for the evolving practice of post mortem radiology, with the pathology trainee learning to interpret radiological diagnostic data mapped against the ante mortem information and external examination. The potential benefits of post mortem radiology require cautious evaluation in the training environment, as some pathologies are not well seen by post mortem computerized tomography (PMCT). There is also the trap of some pathology being readily found, which is not relevant to the cause of death. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 26, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: S Kim Suvarna Tags: Mini-symposium: Cardiothoracic pathology and virtual autopsy Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Rare primary non-neuroendocrine tumours of the sella”, [Diagn Histopathol 25(1), 8–15, January 2019]
This article corrects the following: (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 25, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Federico Roncaroli, Chiara Villa, Debajyoti Chatterjee, Mariam Mansoor, Marco Faustini-Fustini, Caterina Giannini, Kanna Gnanalingham Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research

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(Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 25, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

A spindle cell tumour in the bladder
We report a case of one of these diagnoses - sarcomatoid variant of urothelial carcinoma. We also describe how to differentiate between benign and malignant mimics and discuss the molecular features of sarcomatoid variant of urothelial carcinoma. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 24, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Jon Griffin, Ban Jalil Source Type: research

Autopsy CT scanning: a coroner's viewpoint
This article comments upon the benefits and problems of post-mortem examination by, or with the assistance, of CT scanning. The author was HM Senior Coroner for a Yorkshire jurisdiction before retiring in January 2020. The jurisdiction was the first in England& Wales to introduce CT scanning on a wide scale. The widespread use of CT autopsy has proceeded well and without specific problems. It remains to be seen how long local authorities can continue to fund the increasing costs. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 24, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Christopher Dorries Tags: Mini-symposium: Cardiothoracic pathology and virtual autopsy Source Type: research

Uropathology macroscopy: a pragmatic approach
Macroscopic examination and sampling are the critical initial steps in the histopathological assessment of a surgical specimen. Meticulous macroscopic assessment is critical as abnormalities missed at this stage are unlikely to be identified by histological examination. Complete recording of all relevant macroscopic data is also critical as unlike microscopic data, the former cannot be retrospectively collected. Careful gross examination and targeted sampling is paramount as only about 0.2% of an “all embedded” specimen would actually be microscopically evaluated. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 22, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Margaret L. Sanders, Anne Y. Warren, Murali Varma Tags: Mini-symposium: Nephrourology Source Type: research

Surgical pathology of cystic renal cell carcinomas: is there an overestimation of malignancy?
Most cystic renal epithelial tumors have excellent prognosis after resection despite the high proportion of renal cell “carcinoma” diagnosis. The 2019 Bosniak classification revision and recent downgrading of multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to multilocular cystic renal neoplasm of low malignant potential (MCNLMP) may help reduce the discrepancy. Cystic clear cell (CC) RCC has been shown to behave favorably compared to non-cystic CC RCC and suggests a continuum with MCNLMP which would represent the most indolent of this spectrum. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 22, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Gladell P. Paner, Alessia Cimadamore, Caitlin M. Darrell, Maria S. Tretiakova, Rodolfo Montironi Tags: Mini-symposium: Nephrourology Source Type: research

Common benign mimics of prostate cancer
A challenge in the diagnosis of prostate pathology is the numerous benign mimics of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Most of these lesions have no clinical significance but may be misinterpreted as cancer in biopsy specimens. In this review we describe the features of some of the more common benign mimics and discuss how they can be distinguished from carcinoma. The diagnostic entities most commonly associated with a false positive diagnosis of cancer are the atrophic group of lesions that include simple atrophy, partial atrophy and post-atrophic hyperplasia. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - May 15, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Lars Egevad, Brett Delahunt, Toyonori Tsuzuki, Bungo Furusato, Hemamali Samaratunga Source Type: research

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(Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 30, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Pathology of malignant ovarian germ cell tumours
Germ cell tumours of ovary (GCT) are rapidly growing neoplasms derived from pleuripotent primordial germ cells. They comprise 15 –20% of all ovarian neoplasms of which 95% are mature cystic teratomas and 5% are malignant ovarian germ cell tumours (MOGCT). MOGCT continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues for the pathologist, and they are academically interesting because of the biological diversit y exhibited by these tumours in the two gonads (testis and ovaries). Their correct diagnosis often has major important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 27, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Baljeet Kaur Tags: Mini-symposium: Gynaecological pathology Source Type: research

Distinction of low-grade endometrioid carcinoma in endometrial samplings from high-grade mimics: a practical pattern-based approach
Low grade endometrioid carcinoma may exhibit a diverse spectrum of morphological variations that mimic high grade cancers. In an endometrial sampling, the distinction between low grade endometrioid carcinoma versus higher grades or other tumor types of carcinoma directly affects clinical decisions regarding the type and extent of surgery and lymph node dissection. This review takes a practical pattern-based approach to this differential diagnosis, highlighting glandular, papillary, solid, spindle-cell, clear-cell rich, mucin-rich, and necrotic patterns of low grade endometrioid carcinoma. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 21, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Joseph T. Rabban Tags: Mini-symposium: Gynaecological pathology Source Type: research

Interpretation of p16, p53 and mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry in gynaecological neoplasia
Current management of gynaecological neoplasms is underpinned by their molecular characteristics. For many neoplasms the underlying genetic abnormalities can be reliably detected using immunohistochemistry for protein expression as a surrogate. The three most widely utilized biomarkers in this regard in gynaecological neoplasms are p16, p53 and mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, and it is vital for all pathologists to be aware of the indications for their use, correct interpretation of expression patterns, awareness of technical and interpretive pitfalls as well as appropriate reporting terminology. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 13, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Richard Wing-Cheuk Wong, Andrea Palicelli, Lien Hoang, Naveena Singh Tags: Mini-symposium: Gynaecological pathology Source Type: research

An update of molecular pathology and shifting systems of classification in tumours of the female genital tract
The decreasing costs of next generation sequencing technologies and greater acceptance of molecular and biologic findings into the pathology domain, have shifted our paradigms of classification for many gynecologic tumors. This review focuses on major molecular developments within the last 5 years in endometrial carcinoma, endocervical adenocarcinoma, vulvar squamous cell carcinoma and uterine sarcoma, and the emergence of molecular subgroups within each family of tumors. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 12, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Noorah Almadani, Emily Frances Thompson, Basile Tessier-Cloutier, Jennifer Pors, Lynn Hoang Tags: Mini-symposium: Gynaecological pathology Source Type: research

Inversion or intussusception of the appendix
Two cases of intussusception or inversion of the appendix are highlighted. One patient presented with chronic right iliac fossa pain and at laparoscopic surgery was noted to have a polypoid lesion at the appendiceal orifice opening into the caecum. The second Case was discovered at routine colonoscopy and thought to be a polypoid caecal tumour. In both cases the appendix had inverted and masqueraded as caecal lesions. Histological evaluation showed the entire circumference of the appendix inside of the appendix lumen simulating a telescoping phenomenon. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 9, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Klaudia M. Nowak, Runjan Chetty Tags: Short Case Source Type: research

Uncommon ovarian epithelial tumours
Epithelial ovarian tumours represent the most common type of ovarian tumour. Most of malignant cases represent high-grade serous, clear cell and endometrioid carcinomas; borderline serous and mucinous tumours of intestinal type are less common. This review focuses on the uncommon or rare epithelial tumours of the ovary which include borderline and malignant Brenner tumours, the recently-described mesonephric-like carcinoma of the ovary, and primary ovarian neuroendocrine tumours, with emphasis on helpful and diagnostic features. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 7, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Katherine M. Vroobel, Ayoma D. Attygalle Tags: Mini-symposium: Gynaecological pathology Source Type: research

Prostatic-type tissue in the uterine cervix
We report a case of incidental prostatic-type tissue in a loop excision specimen for cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). We also review the histogenesis, potential pitfalls and immunohistochemistry of this diagnosis. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - April 1, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Hemalatha Bhuvanai Sitaraaman, Jon Griffin, Chris Warren Tags: Short Case Source Type: research

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(Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - March 31, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Erratum to ‘Adenomatous and serrated polyposis syndromes’, [Diagnostic Histopathology 26/1 (2020) 1–7]
The publisher regrets that this article was incorrectly labelled as a Short case (and therefore included the Pathological Society textbox). The article was part of the Mini-Symposium on Gastrointestinal/Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Pathology. (Source: Diagnostic Histopathology)
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - March 19, 2020 Category: Pathology Authors: Amitabh Srivastava Source Type: research