False advertising in dentistry
Advertising dental services is a common way to attract new patients, but it ’s important that the information presented is both factual and supported by sufficient evidence. Patients aren’t all knowledgeable about dental practices, and advertisements should not lead them astray. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 23, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: COMMENTARY Source Type: research

Justifying our existence
Dentists, the health care industry, and the press are pushing the concept that individuals must take care of their oral health or they will suffer heart attacks and any number of other adverse systemic health conditions. A close look at the supposed link between oral health and systemic health is needed to set the record straight. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 23, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: COMMENTARY Source Type: research

Anticarious properties of silver diamine fluoride
The traditional treatment of dental caries requires removal of the caries and placement of a restoration. However, if detected early, the lesion can be remineralized. Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) offers a way to arrest caries and prevent future carious lesion development. It has been used worldwide, except in the United States, for more than 80 years. Current recommendations advise applying 38% SDF directly to the carious lesion twice a year. The clinical use of SDF and limitations and cautions to observe were outlined. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Using silver diamine fluoride for caries arrest
Dental caries is the most prevalent human disease. Although fluoridated toothpaste has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the prevention of dental caries, no drug has been approved for treating dental caries. Ideally, caries treatment would address the bacteria involved, strengthen the teeth, enhance salivary quality and quantity as needed, and diminish sugar consumption. The most common approach for young children is operative treatment, which includes sedation and anesthesia. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Fluoride concentration and frequency of application
Interventions to restore teeth in young children with early childhood caries (ECC) are challenging because of the youth of the patient and the resulting lack of cooperation. Access to dental care can also be limited, resulting in a public health challenge when decayed primary teeth remain mostly untreated. Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has shown the ability to arrest caries in preschool children and has been approved for this off-label use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The SDF agents now available come in various fluoride concentrations, specifically, 12%, 30%, and 38%, with the lower-concentration agents deve...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Alternative methods to reduce dental distress
Dental treatment engenders much less pain than in the past but is still often perceived as uncomfortable for patients. Patients may experience fear or anxiety not just related to the actual care but also to the sights, sounds, and smells associated with the dental office, the relationship to injections, the dental instruments, and the perceived loss of control. As a result, they can experience mental distress. A few patients suffer dental phobia, but many have some degree of anxiety. Many nonpharmacological approaches are available that might improve the dental experience for anxious patients both before and during treatme...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Light activation or not?
Patients often desire to increase the whiteness of their teeth in order to have a better smile. Tooth whitening is a technically easier and less expensive option than veneers and is a highly conservative way to address dental discoloration. It can be done in the office, at home with a professionally dispensed product, or with an over-the-counter product. The products are based on hydrogen peroxide (HP) or carbamide peroxide. Advantages of using in-office bleaching include direct professional supervision to avoid soft-tissue exposure and gel ingestion, reduce treatment time, and obtain rapid whitening. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Managing TMD pain
Facial pain can be challenging to assess for its underlying cause. In addition, having the potential for chronicity can complicate management strategies. When the cause is nondental, which is not uncommon, dentists can struggle to determine what is happening and to craft an appropriate intervention. Headache can be one of those pain disorders that can be challenging, especially headache associated with TMDs. Focusing specifically on headache of temporomandibular origin, a pattern for approaching the patient, making an appropriate diagnosis, and selecting proper management protocols was discussed. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Innovative dental care delivery and coverage models
Little objective evidence proves that the expenditures made on dental care result in better oral health in individuals or populations who receive this care. As a result, innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are being developed to provide evidence-based practice models that use objective dental quality measures to help dental professionals achieve the outcomes their patients desire. Rather than focus on the traditional dental quality measures (process of care, technical standards of care, and patient satisfaction with the experience), the new models incorporate outcomes into the plan. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Big Picture Source Type: research

New dental care delivery approaches
Most health care fields are beginning to recognize the importance of oral health to overall health. In 2010 the Health and Human Services (HHS) department created the Oral Health Initiative, which reinforced the idea that oral health had a place in overall health care. In 2011 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Advancing Oral Health in America, with its companion book, Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations. These publications evaluated the state of oral health in nondental professions, assessed educational settings, and challenged professionals in social work and internal me...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Big Picture Source Type: research

Impact of dental disease on the economy
Although the resources available for health care are limited, health care expenditures have increased in recent years, making it important to carefully consider how resources should be used. Obtaining transparent, reliable, and current information about the type and level of health care costs that are being incurred is vital for policy decision makers in these areas. These parties tend to set priorities based on information. In areas such as oral health care, with unclear or scarce information about the economic impact of dental disorders, no real impact is recorded, so the policies will overlook this important area of hea...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Big Picture Source Type: research

Traumatic dental injury
Eighty-five percent of persons who come for treatment of an oral injury have a traumatic dental injury (TDI), making this a very frequent occurrence. The actual frequency of TDIs is unknown, probably because the diagnosis has not been standardized and no registry has been created to keep track of cases. A literature  search was done to provide an estimate of world TDI frequency. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Big Picture Source Type: research

Dentists' opinions of innovative technologies
The level of use of digital technologies in society varies greatly, which is also the case for dentistry. Changes have been made in dental work patterns and in workplaces because of digital technology, and there is the potential to change the dental profession itself. Users' opinions and how widely technology is used vary between and within professions, partly because of the content and organization of the work, partly due to social processes within the profession, and partly in accordance with the attitudes and resources of the professionals. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Front Office Source Type: research

Going digital
The developments taking place in digital technology for dentistry have the potential to improve clinical care through streamlined diagnostics, increased case acceptance, better treatment planning, and improved communication. The dentistry delivered is more predictable and has greater long-term success, which is an attractive reason for implementing digital technology for both patients and dentists. Dentists have been slow to incorporate digital dental technologies in their practices, with cost and the needed learning curve being negatives that contribute to this slow penetration. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Front Office Source Type: research

Updating your website
Investing in updated features for the dental practice website is an essential element in differentiating it from others and in reaching new patients. A website that isn't mobile-friendly will be quickly abandoned by users today, which means a loss of potential patients and less contact with current patients. Three specific changes are essential to making the website better and more in tune with the needs of patients. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Front Office Source Type: research

What do to when an employee embezzles from you
Embezzlement tends to be viewed as something that happens to other people, but the truth is that no industry is immune to this epidemic. Three of every 5 dentists will be victims of embezzlement during their years of practice. Personal insights about who embezzles, instructions about what to do, and cautions about what not to do were offered. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Front Office Source Type: research

Turning prospects into patients
Google searches are an important part of the process of making a connection between a prospective patient and the dental practice. However, more than a fancy website is required to make the dental website among the first batch of results of a search. A comprehensive approach to digital marketing will not just attract prospects but nurture them until they become patients. Strategies to attract and convert prospects into patients were outlined. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Front Office Source Type: research

Sixth stage of dental practice growth
Dental service organizations (DSOs) are becoming more common in dentistry and control a larger part of the dental market than in the past. The pathway to growth from a solo practice to a complex of more than 40 offices follows specific stages where challenges need to be overcome to move on to the next stage. The focus is now on Stage  6. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Front Office Source Type: research

Subscription plan rather than insurance
Persons who have dental insurance are more than 2 ½ times more likely to visit the dentist than those without coverage. With the aging population, more people will be without dental insurance, with adults over age 65 years having the lowest rates of dental coverage. An option is private-pay insurance plans, but in almost 70% of cases, the insuranc e premium and copays are higher than the actual market price of the dental care received over the course of a year. Although patients like the monthly payment installments that these plans offer, the fact that the outlay of money is greater than the cost of services render...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: The Front Office Source Type: research

Managing attrition
Attrition, which refers to the loss of tooth structure caused by contact between teeth, is usually seen occlusally, but can also occur interproximally. The typical presentation is marked wear facets coupled with complimentary wear facets in the upper and lower dentition. Many patients with this problem are bruxers. Erosion can also be seen with attrition or abrasion and is particularly common in patients who eat significant numbers of oranges or other acidic foods. The diagnosis, etiology and contributing factors, and clinical management and restoration of teeth with attrition were updated. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Erosion related to systemic disorders
In addition to its relationship to oral disorders, erosive tooth wear (ETW) should be seen as a possible symptom of serious medical conditions. Many of the medical conditions related to ETW have the potential to cause the patient's death. The relationship between ETW and the most common relevant systemic diseases, which include gastroesophageal disorders, eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, rumination, and alcoholism, was explored, with particular attention to the role of the dental office in addressing the situation. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Algorithm to analyze cardiac risk
The risk of suffering a cardiac event related to invasive dental treatment is higher in the first 4 weeks after the treatment compared to other time periods. For patients who have cardiac disease, an additional risk for major cardiac events or stroke exists. To judge the risk for such cardiac responses, dentists would benefit from having a method of identifying patients with heart disease whose condition puts them at higher cardiac risk levels. Several factors contribute to the higher risk for cardiac problems, including the widespread occurrence of ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and related comorbidities in dental...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

New hypertension guidelines
The American Heart Association (AHA) released changes to the definition and classification of hypertension developed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the AHA, and 9 other health professional organizations in November 2017. These guidelines are based on more than 900 published studies and update the 2003 Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. The major changes made and their relevance to dental professionals were outlined. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Deep caries lesions approaches
Conventionally, caries lesions are treated with complete removal of decayed tissue, followed by tooth restoration. For deep lesions, the risk of pulp exposure is increased, which can require endodontic treatment. Conservative techniques of removing carious dentin have been developed to treat asymptomatic teeth with reversible pulp inflammation. The stepwise excavation (SW) approach involves complete excavation of the decayed areas in 2 steps. First, the carious dentin is removed, then 6 to 9 months later the cavity is reopened for final excavation and restoration. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Compromising dental records
The quality of record keeping in dentistry has not been studied extensively, but it is recognized as an important component for the delivery of safe, appropriate care. The development of the electronic dental record (EDR) arms dentists with functionality that allows them to manage patient information and administrative duties more quickly and comprehensively. Tools help to record a narrative, create templates, generate treatment plans, prepare patient advice sheets, and incorporate digital images in the record. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Chairside fabricated lithium silicate crowns
With more patients expecting esthetic as well as functional restorations, materials have been developed to help dentists meet these expectations. All-ceramic materials are often the selection made for crowns to avoid the chipping common with veneered metal-ceramics. When dentists add the ability to provide computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) chairside, lithium disilicate material is highly qualified for its ability to provide sufficient strength as well as esthetics. However, the long-term clinical performance of chairside generated monolithic lithium disilicate crowns has remained to be evaluated ...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Oral health care in HIV-infected patients
At the end of 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated 1.2 million people were living with HIV in the United States. The availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has made HIV a chronic, manageable illness, with a life expectancy among well-controlled patients comparable to that of persons without HIV. Despite the availability of ART and its ability to suppress the disease to undetectable levels, there are still obstacles to effective treatment and control of the epidemic. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Optimizing implant success
Although dental implants are a practical and sustainable tooth replacement option, their success, while at a high rate, is not guaranteed. Both local and systemic factors can adversely affect the survival of implants. Dental practitioners need to be aware of these factors and monitor or address them before implant failure develops. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Antibiotic coverage
The accepted practice in the past was to use antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis to accompany dental implant placement. However, this practice was developed before the problems of antibiotic resistance were known and when antimicrobial stewardship was not considered. Today, dentists and dental specialists must determine when to use antibiotics for implant placement procedures. After obtaining a thorough dental evaluation, patients should be given antibiotics based on a case-by-case evaluation. It is not unusual, however, for dentists to use a rule-based approach or treat antibiotics as an insurance against infection and us...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Prescribing habits and alternatives
Many common dental conditions can be managed effectively without the prescription of opioid analgesics or antibiotics. Because of the abuse, misuse, and overdose potential for these agents, dental professionals and their medical colleagues need to use them judiciously. The current practices of dental professionals with regard to prescribing opioids and antibiotics, alternatives that could be used, and preventive actions dentists can take to limit the abuse potential with these agents were detailed. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Hands On Source Type: research

Best storage medium for avulsed teeth
Tooth avulsion is complete loss of a tooth from its alveolar socket as a result of some type of trauma. Usually the tooth involved is a maxillary central incisor. Children age7 to 10 years are the most common patients to suffer tooth avulsion. Avulsion causes disruption of the vascular and nerve supply, which leads to pulp death. In addition, there is tearing of the periodontal ligament (PDL), resulting in damage to its cells, which form a part of the attachment apparatus. Later replantation of the avulsed tooth depends significantly on the viability of PDL cells on the surface of the root. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Mandated reporter and child welfare system interactions
Children who are maltreated or abused are at increased risk for developmental disorders and have a lower probability of having a normal, wholesome childhood. In addition, many children suffer challenges related to abuse throughout their lives. Several countries have enacted legislation that mandates the reporting of possible maltreatment by designated personnel, usually including all health personnel. The Norwegian public dental health service (PDHS) is mandated to prioritize the prevention of dental disease and offer all children under age 19 years free regular dental treatments. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Accuracy of pulp tests
Successful endodontic treatment relies on an accurate pulpal diagnosis, which is determined by the neurovascular changes in the pulp. Several methods can be used to diagnose pulp conditions, including pulp sensibility tests such as cold pulp testing (CPT), heat pulp testing (HPT), and electric pulp testing (EPT); laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF); and pulse oximetry (PO). Clinicians should understand the diagnostic accuracy of the various methods to reach the correct diagnosis and select the most effective treatment. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Effects of radiation therapy on pulp responsiveness
Patients who have malignant tumors of the head and neck often receive radiation therapy (RT) as part of their treatment to control cell growth. To reach the target cells, radiation must pass through healthy tissues, which can suffer DNA damage. For head and neck treatments, teeth are often in the pathway of RT and can receive high doses of radiation. Several adverse effects develop, including lack of tooth sensitivity, acute hematologic abnormalities, chemical injuries in the tissues, changes in microcirculation, and altered pulp sensitivity, which can make it difficult to assess the pulp ’s health accurately. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Enamel defects
Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative demarcated enamel defect that affects at least 1 first permanent molar and is often seen on the permanent incisors. The global prevalence of MIH is 14.2%. A similar enamel defect affecting second primary molars is hypomineralized second primary molar (HSPM). The causes of these disorders remain unclear, but researchers agree the etiology is likely multifactorial. The consequences attending MIH make it a public health problem because they involve not just health-related but also economic adverse effects. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Prevalence of peri-implantitis
The primary cause of implant failure is peri-implantitis. Various host- and implant-related factors contribute to create differences between the periodontal and peri-implant tissues. Peri-implant diseases, because of their high prevalence and lack of standard treatment protocol, are considered an important category of disorders. The overall prevalence of peri-implantitis and the effect of various factors on the reported prevalence were investigated. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Reversing soft tissue anesthesia
Dental procedures are often done with the patient under local anesthesia, usually produced by lidocaine. The pulpal anesthesia lasts about an hour, but the soft tissue anesthesia lasts much longer —between 3 and 5 hours. Since the average dental appointment is just 51 minutes, patients experience numbness in their lips, cheek, and tongue long after their dental appointment is over. This impairs their ability to eat, drink, and speak and can increase the risk of biting their soft tissues ina dvertently. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Sedation rather than general anesthesia for children
In Cornwall, United Kingdom, there are long waiting lists for dental procedures done under general anesthesia (GA). In addition, the service overseeing these is both under-funded and overwhelmed at this point. Data were collected in a service evaluation to support the expansion of the relative analgesia (RA) technique and to provide valuable data for other service providers. The goals were to establish the efficacy of RA treatments; determine if RA can reduce the need for expensive, higher risk GA sessions; and determine if RA reduces the number of teeth extracted. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Oral health and respiratory pathogens causing pneumonia
Institutionalized patients ’ mortality from pneumonia is reportedly as much as 41%, with the primary mechanism believed to be direct aspiration of bacteria colonizing the oral cavity into the lungs. Patients with poor dental or oral health and therefore a higher bacterial load are at a higher risk for developing bacteremia and developing infection in distant sites. Respiratory pathogens flourish in the dental biofilm, making its presence a particular risk factor in the development of pneumonia and other problems. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Periodontitis and the retinal microcirculation
The inflammation associated with periodontal disease not only affects the local oral environment but also has the potential to affect distant organs through systemic inflammatory pathways. Chronic periodontitis has shown associations with cardiovascular disease and causes systemic effects on large vessels, endothelial function, macrovascular structures, carotid intima-media thickness, and peripheral vascular function. In addition, it contributes to macrovascular reactions in large vessels, possibly through the inflammatory cascade. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Retention and the inadvertently active retainer
Nearly every patient who has orthodontic treatment must then have retention applied. Currently no consensus has identified the best retention regimen to use in all cases. Although retention procedures differ from country to country, the trends seen now are the use of more invisible retainers instead of Hawley retainers, more fixed retention, and retention that is lifelong rather than for a limited time only. Complications that occur with the long-term use of bonded retainers include an “unintentionally active retainer,” which can move the root almost completely out of the alveolar process (Figure 1). (Sour...
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Feeding frequency and caries in children
Having dental caries early in life tends to be associated with a lower quality of life. Dental research has sought to identify areas where caries prevention efforts can be targeted to avoid having caries develop. Infants who consume a high-sugar, low-fiber diet appear to be at risk for overweight in childhood, obesity, and micronutrient deficiency, as well as dental caries. Feeding habits, especially in the first year of life, can include breastfeeding, bottle-feeding, and the introduction of other foods. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Have caries, have fewer respiratory ills
The anatomical connectivity between the oral cavity and the respiratory system may be a factor in any link between respiratory disease and oral health. Some evidence has been found for associations between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and oral health in adults and between pneumonia and oral health. In addition, randomized controlled trials have indicated that improvement in oral health and regular professional dental care can reduce lower respiratory tract infection in high-risk elderly who are living in institutional settings. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Periodontitis and cirrhosis
The etiology of periodontitis is generally believed to be multifactorial. The inflammation of this disease affects the supporting tissues of the teeth and causes deepening of the periodontal pockets, loss of connective tissue attachment, and loss of alveolar bone mass. If it is not treated, periodontitis can cause discomfort and pain, impair eating ability, and lead to tooth loss. Patients with cirrhosis tend to have poor oral health that can lead to infection, which, along with malnutrition, is a common, serious complication of cirrhosis that leads to increased morbidity and mortality. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Gingival recession and orthodontic treatment
Gingival recession involves the exposure of the tooth root surface as the gingival margin moves apically to the cementoenamel junction. The resulting appearance is not only unattractive but the exposure can lead to dentin hypersensitivity and root caries. Causes or contributing factors are many, including aging, periodontitis, traumatic tooth brushing, tobacco use, intraoral and perioral piercings, unusual tooth morphology or eruption, and anatomically reduced bone thickness or thin gingival biotype over the root area. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Fixed appliance effects on clinical attachment levels
Some adverse effects are associated with fixed appliance therapy, such as root resorption, white spot lesions, or periodontal implications, including the loss of alveolar bone and loss of periodontal attachment. Proper oral hygiene is more difficult when orthodontic fixed appliances are in place, resulting in plaque accumulation and mild inflammation of the oral tissues. Fixed appliances can also affect the microbial and clinical intraoral conditions, which can vary according to patient-, site-, and appliance-specific characteristics. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Parental satisfaction and adverse side effects
Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has shown itself to effectively arrest dental caries and is especially helpful for preschool children who have poor access to dental care. SDF is, however, associated with several side effects. The blackening of arrested carious lesions by SDF has led to poor parental acceptance of the treatment. For young children, parents ’ satisfaction with an intervention can play a major role affecting the adherence to treatment and its success. Other side effects of SDF include pulpal and tissue irritation, pulpal damage, white lesion development on the mucosa, and gingival irritation. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Linking risk factors for noncommunicable diseases
Both caries and periodontal diseases are examples of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and show links to other NCDs. The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued guidelines advising the reduction of added sugars in the diet to prevent caries, avoid obesity, and reduce the development of other NCDs. Added sugar consumption is likely to be involved in the development of periodontal diseases as well. Chronic oral diseases are seldom considered together, especially with respect to common risk factors. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Autotransplantation
When teeth are lost because of trauma, caries, periodontitis, or endodontic problems or if tooth impaction or agenesis occurs, tooth autotransplantation is a possible treatment option. Successfully autotransplanted teeth offer the advantages of ensuring a vital periodontium, continuous eruption, preservation of alveolar bone volume and the interdental papilla, the possibility of tooth movement by either orthodontic or physiological forces, and the ability to use the technique in growing subjects. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Tags: Inquiry Source Type: research

Dental World
Hello Everyone, (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - November 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: research