Exploring which factors contribute to teens' participation in sexting
Publication date: Available online 23 June 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): José A. Casas, Monica Ojeda, Paz Elipe, Rosario Del ReyAbstractAn increasing proportion of adolescents appear to see sexting as something normal, despite the serious consequences it can have on their well-being. Only little is known about the factors that facilitate teens' participation, and even less about whether the same factors influence different types of sexting behaviors – sending, receiving, forwarding, or receiving via an intermediary – in different ways. Here we analyze whether the need for popularity, ...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Phubbing behavior in conversations and its relation to perceived conversation intimacy and distraction: An exploratory observation study
This study examines the occurrence, frequency and duration of co-present phone use, also known as ‘phubbing’ behavior, during a dyadic conversation and its association with perceived conversation intimacy and distraction. Phubbing was measured by covertly observing students having a 10-min dyadic conversation (N = 100 dyads). Afterwards, participants were approached and asked to complete measures of how intimate they perceived the last 10 min of their conversation, and how distracted they perceived themselves and their conversation partners. Results reveal that phubbing occurred in 62 of the 100 observed ...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Impacts of online risky behaviors and cybersecurity management on cyberbullying and traditional bullying victimization among Korean youth: Application of cyber-routine activities theory with latent class analysis
Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Kyung-Shick Choi, Sujung Cho, Jin Ree LeeAbstractPrevious studies have demonstrated that higher Internet and digital technology usage increases adolescents’ likelihood of experiencing online victimization, including cyberbullying victimization. Despite the rise in cyberbullying incidents among adolescents, few empirical studies have discussed plausible explanations for how online lifestyles and cybersecurity management influence cyberbullying victimization in comparison to traditional bullying. Using a sample of 7109 Korean a...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 19, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Understanding facebook news posts comment reading and reacting behavior through political extremism and cultural orientation
Publication date: Available online 13 June 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Mashael Y. Almoqbel, Donghee Yvette Wohn, Rebecca A. Hayes, Meeyoung ChaAbstractSocial media allows the readers of online news posts more engagement with the article through comments and comment Liking. Motivations for such actions are important because engagement around a comment increases the accessibility of that comment to other readers, leading to a far-reaching effect on the news post ground truth. Yet, motivations behind these actions and how they relate to the increasingly polarized political environment is understudied. Th...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

A Systematic Review of Literature on Cyber Intimate Partner Victimization in Adolescent Girls and Women
Publication date: Available online 12 June 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Mylène Fernet, Andréanne Lapierre, Martine Hébert, Marie-Marthe CousineauAbstractIntimate partner violence (IPV), and dating violence are major health issues, causing negative health outcomes, and in some cases, ending in homicides. In a lifetime, nearly one out of two individuals will have reported being victimized by a current or a former partner, with higher victimization rates in women. The development of communication technologies, and infatuation for online social networks created new tools to stalk, hara...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 13, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

The role of organizational identification and the desire to succeed in employees’ use of personal twitter accounts for work
This study aims to develop a better understanding of the potential drivers of personal social media use for work and the work-related information employees share through these platforms. This is important given both the increased use of social media as a form of self-presentation and the potential organizational consequences of workers' online knowledge and information sharing behaviors. The results draw upon a multi-method design combining survey data with content analysis data of workers’ personal Twitter accounts. Findings indicate that organizational identification and a desire to succeed are related to the shari...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 13, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Emerging Technologies for Artifact Construction in Learning
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Antigoni Parmaxi, Panayiotis Zaphiris (Source: Computers in Human Behavior)
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Which EEG Feedback Works Better for Creativity Performance in Immersive Virtual Reality: The Reminder or Encouraging Feedback?
Publication date: Available online 6 June 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Xiaozhe Yang, Lin Lin, Pei-Yu Cheng, Xue Yang, Youqun RenAbstractThe purpose of this study is to investigate whether the feedback designed based on EEG (electroencephalography) signals contributes to an individual's creative performance in an immersive virtual reality setting. Two specific forms of feedback were used. The first one was "reminder feedback," given when brainwaves indicated the participant's attention was not concentrated. The second one was “encouraging feedback,” given when brainwaves indicated ...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

The Time-concurrent or Time-ordered Effect of Population Heterogeneity and State Dependence on Cyberbullying: Assessing Lagged Auto-regression and Crossed-lagged Regression Models
This study attempts to examine why prior offending behavior influences subsequent offending behavior by testing the hypothesized relationship derived from the integrated approach of population heterogeneity and state dependence. Using six-year data from the Korean Children Youth Panel Survey (KCYPS) in a longitudinal research design, the findings reveal that two measures of population heterogeneity (low self-control and cyber lifestyles) have both time-concurrent and time-ordered effects on cyberbullying perpetration. The link between low self-control and cyberbullying perpetration is partially mediated by cyber lifestyles...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Lessons learned applying learning analytics to assess serious games
Publication date: October 2019Source: Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 99Author(s): Cristina Alonso-Fernández, Ana R. Cano, Antonio Calvo-Morata, Manuel Freire, Iván Martínez-Ortiz, Baltasar Fernández-ManjónAbstractSerious Games have already proved their advantages in different educational environments. Combining them with Game Learning Analytics can further improve the life-cycle of serious games, by informing decisions that shorten development time and reduce development iterations while improving their impact, therefore fostering their adoption. Game Learning Analytics is an evidenc...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Effect of Disfluency on Learning Outcomes, Metacognitive Judgments and Cognitive Load in Computer Assisted Learning Environments
Publication date: Available online 5 June 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Ulaş İLİC, Yavuz AkbulutAbstractCognitive challenges that are presented through the modification of established design principles may contribute to learning. One such challenge to the promotion of deeper processing is the Disfluency Effect. Specifically, disfluency manipulations in learning materials interfere with the perceptional fluency, which may in turn lead to better learning outcomes. This likelihood of reaching better learning outcomes through minor instructional modifications has led scholars to investigate the construct...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

“THE RUSSIANS ARE HACKING MY BRAIN!” investigating Russia's internet research agency twitter tactics during the 2016 United States presidential campaign
This study analyzed tweets from handles associated with the Russian Internet Research Agency in an effort to better understand the tactics employed by that organization on the social media platform Twitter in their attempt to influence U.S. political discourse and the outcome of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. We sampled tweets from the month preceding the election and analyzed to understand the qualitative nature of these tweets as well as quantitative differences between how types of IRA Twitter accounts communicated. Seven categories of tweet behavior were identified: attack left, support right, attack right, suppo...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Is cyberbullying a group process? Online and offline bystanders of cyberbullying act as defenders, reinforcers and outsiders
This study used a sample of 996 Colombian and Spanish young adults who filled in an online survey focused on different behaviors while witnessing cyberbullying. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed, together with construct validity and invariance analyses to validate the questionnaire and describe different cyberbullying bystander groups. The questionnaire showed excellent psychometric properties. Different groups of cyber-bystanders were described including online and offline defenders of cybervictims, reinforcers of cyberbullying, and outsiders. Findings from this study can be used for policy and p...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Learned applying learning analytics to assess serious games
Publication date: Available online 1 June 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Cristina Alonso-Fernández, Ana Rus Cano, Antonio Calvo-Morata, Manuel Freire, Iván Martínez-Ortiz, Baltasar Fernández-ManjónAbstractSerious Games have already proved their advantages in different educational environments. Combining them with Game Learning Analytics can further improve the life-cycle of serious games, by informing decisions that shorten development time and reduce development iterations while improving their impact, therefore fostering their adoption. Game Learning Analytics is an e...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

How prior knowledge affects problem-solving performance in a medical simulation game: Using game-logs and eye-tracking
This study aims to empirically test whether prior knowledge affects these four aspects of performance in a medical simulation game for resuscitation skills training. Participants were 24 medical professionals (experts, with high prior knowledge) and 22 medical students (novices, with low prior knowledge). After pre-training, they all played one scenario, during which game-logs and eye-movements were collected. A cognitive-load questionnaire ensued. During game play, experts demonstrated a more systematic approach, higher accuracy in visual selection and motor reaction, and a higher performance speed than novices. Their rep...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - June 1, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Editorial Emerging Technologies for Artifact Construction in Learning
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): (Source: Computers in Human Behavior)
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 31, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

“THE RUSSIANS ARE HACKING MY BRAIN!” Investigating Russia’s Internet Research Agency Twitter Tactics during the 2016 United States Presidential Campaign
This study analyzed tweets from handles associated with the Russian Internet Research Agency in an effort to better understand the tactics employed by that organization on the social media platform Twitter in their attempt to influence U.S. political discourse and the outcome of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. We sampled tweets from the month preceding the election and analyzed to understand the qualitative nature of these tweets as well as quantitative differences between how types of IRA Twitter accounts communicated. Seven categories of tweet behavior were identified: attack left, support right, attack right, suppo...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

A Quantitative Analysis of Factors Related to Taiwan Teenagers’ Smartphone Addiction Tendency Using a Random Sample of Parent-child Dyads
This study aims to address individual and parental factors related to teenagers’ (mainly aged 13 to 18) smartphone addiction tendency (SAT) with a representative sample of parent-child dyads around Taiwan. We try to draw a holistic view of how Taiwan youngsters use their smartphones and how their parents mediate that use by surveying all possible factors related to that use. According to the analytical results, we ascertained that smartphone ownership and dissimilar purposes for surfing the Internet are associated with students’ SAT. Online games and trade are related to younger students’ SAT, while SNSs ...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

The effect of ad integration and interactivity on young teenagers’ memory, brand attitude and personal data sharing
Publication date: Available online 28 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Kristien Daems, Patrick De Pelsmacker, Ingrid MoonsAbstractContemporary online advertising is characterized by the integration of advertising in other content and brand interactivity. Integrated advertising embeds a persuasive message into informative or entertaining content. Brand interactivity refers to interactions consumers have with brands in advertising messages. A two (integration vs. no integration) x two (brand interactivity vs. no brand interactivity) between subjects experiment (n = 576) examines the effect of online adve...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Gamified Performance Assessment of Collaborative Problem Solving Skills
Publication date: Available online 28 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Kristin Stoeffler, Yigal Rosen, Maria Bolsinova, Alina A. von DavierAbstractIn this paper we introduce a game-based approach for Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) Skills assessment and provide preliminary evidence from a validation pilot study. To date, educational assessments have focused more heavily on the concrete, and accessible aspects of CPS with a diminished representation of the social aspects of CPS. We addressed this issue through the integration of our CPS construct into the game-based assessment “Circuit Runner&...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Receptive versus interactive video screens: A role for the brain's default mode network in learning from media
Publication date: October 2019Source: Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 99Author(s): Daniel R. Anderson, Matthew C. DavidsonAbstractRecent neuroscience research has revealed the presence of multiple brain networks underlying functional human psychology. One of these, the default mode network (DMN), has been shown to underlie sustained attention to and comprehension of narrative receptive media such as television. We argue that DMN activation enhances learning of temporal and spatial context and that this type of learning is characteristic of receptive media. We hypothesize that response demands during interactive screen ...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 28, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Battling gender stereotypes: A user study of a code-learning game, “Code Combat,” with middle school children
This study attempts to highlight that females are still being negatively affected by existing gender stereotypes and prescribed gender identities despite relatively equal access and use of computer technology. This qualitative study aims to provide insights about the first-time user experience in a home environment of 16 middle school children in Turkey (8 males - 8 females), aged between 11 and 14 years, with a code learning game named “Code Combat”. The analysis is supported with complementary quantitative findings. The present study investigates the participants' conceptualizations and opinions toward coding...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 26, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Effectiveness of virtual and augmented reality-enhanced exercise on physical activity, psychological outcomes, and physical performance: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
This study included 22 research articles published between 1997 and 2017, involving 1184 participants aged 18 to 79. The results showed a large effect on physical activity (Hedges' g = 0.83, SE = 0.18), a small to moderate effect on physical performance (Hedges’ g = 0.31, SE = 0.09), and no significant effect on psychological outcomes. VR training programs were particularly shown to be effective for enhancing frequency of physical activity and strength of physical performance. Only two studies examined the effectiveness of AR training programs on physical performance, and the findings concerning those...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 26, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Advice Reification, Learning, and Emergent Collective Intelligence in Online Health Support Communities
Publication date: Available online 24 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Joshua Introne, Sean GogginsABSTRACTOnline health support forums utilize straightforward online discussion designs to create a sociotechnical space where people can seek social support from others. The advice generated in these forums exists as an archival resource for future health information seekers. The present study uses mixed methods to investigate how invisible social processes lead advice to be adapted over time by forum members. Drawing on the construct of ‘reification’ from the communities of practice (COP) lit...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: September 2019Source: Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 98Author(s): (Source: Computers in Human Behavior)
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

When audiences become advocates: Self-induced behavior change through health message posting in social media
Publication date: Available online 23 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Robin L. Nabi, Richard Huskey, Spencer B. Nicholls, Lauren Keblusek, Megan ReedAbstractCouched within the self-effects paradigm of social media influence, this research examines how posting a health promotion message to one’s social media influences one’s own, versus others’, later health behaviors, with emphasis on emotional intensity and message sharing directives. 382 participants viewed one of eight versions of a melanoma awareness video and were given the opportunity to post it to their Facebook page. Video sh...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 23, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

The prevalence and impact of online trolling of UK members of parliament
In this study we surveyed UK MPs about their experiences and the impact of being trolled by completing a short online questionnaire. One-hundred and eighty-one MPs responded to our survey. Chi-square tests for independence and one-way ANOVA was employed to analyse the data. All MPs had experienced trolling and many were trolled multiple times a day, and the principle platforms for this abuse were Twitter and Facebook. The pattern of trolling varied between male and female targets, with males reporting more concern about reputational damage, and females more concern about their personal safety. The impact of being trolled v...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Accidentally Attentive:Comparing visual, close-ended, and open-ended measures of attention on social media
Publication date: Available online 21 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Emily K. Vraga, Leticia Bode, Anne-Bennett Smithson, Sonya Troller-RenfreeAbstractThe question of how to measure exposure to different types of content on social media grows in importance with increased use of these media. Social media further complicate this task by bringing diverse content into the same space, raising the question of whether selective exposure or incidental exposure theories best explain attention patterns. We contribute to this debate in two ways. First, we test how well visual attention aligns with expressed con...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Efficiency model of micro-course study based on cognitive psychology in the college
This article proposes a cognitive model that enables a quantitative analysis of cognitive time, accuracy, and efficiency in both types of teaching methods. Compared with those exposed to traditional textbook learning, students exposed to micro-courses had a shorter cognitive time and improved cognitive accuracy. The experimental results indicated that micro-courses improved cognitive efficiency, with an average improvement of 157.51%. The improvement in cognitive efficiency in the micro-course group was much more striking at the higher cognitive stages. Similar additional experiments were conducted to evaluate the proposed...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Psychopathic Traits and Social Anxiety in Cyber-Space: A Context-Dependent Theoretical Framework Explaining Online Disinhibition
This study aimed to examine the relationship of two socially maladaptive personal characteristics, namely psychopathic traits and social anxiety, with online disinhibition. Furthermore, the effect of empathy (affective and cognitive) was examined through moderation analysis. The investigation was based on a context-dependent theoretical framework, according to which, the structural characteristics of cyberspace increase or decrease the expression of certain personal tendencies, thus differentiating an individual’s behavior. Overall, 1,097 Greek Junior High School students from Northern Greece voluntarily completed an...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Perceived Responsiveness in Text Messaging: The Role of Emoji Use
Discussion centers around whether emojis can serve as a substitute for nonverbal cues typically found in face-to-face conversations. (Source: Computers in Human Behavior)
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 21, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Use of a non-human robot audience to induce stress reactivity in human participants
This study examined whether a non-human robot audience can elicit a stress response in human participants. A 90-min experimental laboratory session based on the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) using a pre-recorded robot audience, was presented as a live on-screen simulation. Nineteen participants (female = 16) aged 21–57 years (M = 29.74) underwent a 10-min mock interview and mathematics task in front of the robot audience. Salivary cortisol was assessed at 10-min before and immediately prior to the start of the stress test, and +10-, +30- and +40-min after the start of the test. Heart rate was assessed...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 19, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

A latent profile analysis of adult students’ online self-regulation in blended learning environments
Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Silke Vanslambrouck, Chang Zhu, Bram Pynoo, Koen Lombaerts, Jo Tondeur, Ronny SchererAbstractSelf-regulated learning (SRL) is crucial for academic success; therefore support, to enhance and maintain SRL skills is important. In blended adult education, the heterogeneity of adults creates diversity in SRL abilities, which makes it necessary to provide tailored support. Conducting latent profile analyses for a sample of 213 blended adult students, we identified three profiles, namely high, low, and moderate SRL profiles which prove dif...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 19, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Open source software: The effects of training on acceptance” [Computers in Human Behavior 49 (2015) 390–399]
Publication date: October 2019Source: Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 99Author(s): M. Dolores Gallego, F. José Racero, Salvador Bueno, Jan Noyes (Source: Computers in Human Behavior)
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 19, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Recognition in Makerspaces: Supporting Opportunities for Women to “Make” a STEM Career
Publication date: Available online 16 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Anna Keune, Kylie A. Peppler, Karen E. WohlwendAbstractMaking is a playful exploration of tools and materials to design personally meaningful artifacts, providing a particularly impactful entry point for traditionally underrepresented youth in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. However, it remains unclear how these constructionist explorations translate to eventual professional and educational STEM opportunities, especially for women. This paper tracks an exemplary case in a makerspace to theorize, desc...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Conversational Engagement and Mobile Technology Use
Publication date: Available online 16 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Jens F. Binder, Klaudia Cebula, Sondos Metwally, Michael Vernon, Christopher Atkin, Suvo Mitra (Source: Computers in Human Behavior)
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Determining the effect of stress on analytical skills performance in digital decision games Towards an unobtrusive measure of experienced stress in gameplay scenarios
This study aims to develop an unobtrusive measure for experienced stress in a digital serious gaming environment involving decision making in crisis management, using only in-game measures in a digital decision game called the Mayor Game. Research has shown that stress has an influence on a decision-maker’s behavior, and also on the learning experience in training scenarios. Being able to assess unobtrusively the level of stress experienced would allow manipulation of the game so as to improve the learning experience. An experiment was conducted with two conditions, one paced and one non-paced. In the paced condition...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Incivility on Facebook and Political Polarization: The Mediating Role of Seeking Further Comments and Negative Emotion
This study examined whether and how (in)civility and the presence of supporting evidence in disagreeing comments influence individuals’ attitude polarization. The study used a 2 (civility vs. incivility) × 2 (evidence vs. no evidence) factorial design involving reading dissimilar viewpoints in Facebook comments. The results showed that exposure to uncivil opposing comments, compared to exposure to civil disagreeing comments, led to lower levels of willingness to read more comments and greater levels of negative emotions and attitude polarization. However, the presence or absence of supporting evidence in commen...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Habit and Addiction in the Use of Social Networking Sites: Their Nature, Antecedents, and Consequences
Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): DongBack Seo, Soumya RayAbstractHabit and addiction are two distinct drivers of information technology (IT) use that nonetheless bear increasing resemblance in how they are conceptualized and modeled in the information systems (IS) literature. The purpose of this study is to aid the further growth of these heretofore-independent streams of research by developing a comparative framework that allows us to distinguish between them. Drawing on the theories of automaticity and incentive-sensitization, we developed a theoretical model tha...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Hey Alexa … examine the variables influencing the use of artificial intelligent in-home voice assistants
Publication date: October 2019Source: Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 99Author(s): Graeme McLean, Kofi Osei-FrimpongAbstractArtificial Intelligent (AI) In-home Voice Assistants have seen unprecedented growth. However, we have little understanding on the factors motivating individuals to use such devices. Given the unique characteristics of the technology, in the main hands free, controlled by voice, and the presentation of a voice user interface, the current technology adoption models are not comprehensive enough to explain the adoption of this new technology. Focusing on voice interactions, this research combines the ...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 17, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Mobile game-based learning in secondary education: Students’ immersion, game activities, team performance and learning outcomes
In this study of the game “NoCredit, GameOver!®” (NCGO), students' game activities are explored and related to their learning outcomes and performance in the game. Secondary school students used tablets to access virtual information about having debts and to perform tasks in an urban environment. Data were gathered from 181 students who completed questionnaires concerning their game activities in a team, immersion into the game and character assigned to them, and learning outcomes. The extent to which students empathized with the game characters appeared be negatively related to their interest in and knowle...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 16, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Identifying indicators of smartphone addiction through user-app interaction
Publication date: Available online 12 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Beryl Noë, Liam D. Turner, David E.J. Linden, Stuart M. Allen, Bjorn Winkens, Roger M. WhitakerAbstractWe introduce a new approach to monitoring the activity of smartphone users based on their physical interactions with the interface. Typical events are taps, scrolling and typing, carried out to interact with apps. As compared to other measures, this directly encapsulates potential problematic physical smartphone behaviour as a signal. The approach contrasts against conventions such as self-reporting or timing activity sessions...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Collective sense-making in times of crisis: Connecting terror management theory with twitter reactions to the Berlin terrorist attack
This study focuses on the content of Twitter messages related to the 2016 terrorist attack on the Berlin Christmas market. We complement the collective sense-making perspective with the terror management theory (TMT) perspective to understand why people used Twitter in the aftermath of the attack. We use structural topic modeling to analyze our dataset of 51,000 tweets. Our results indicate that people used Twitter to make sense of the events and as part of typical reactions in TMT, that is, to validate their own worldviews and maintain their self-esteem. In accordance with TMT, we found that people used Twitter to search ...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 11, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Comparing and Modeling via Social Media: The Social Influences of Fitspiration on Male Instagram Users’ Work out Intention
This study examines the effects of Instagram fitspiration images on male viewers’ work out intention by integrating the processes of social comparison and social cognitive theory. The results from 1,428 Instagram users in Taiwan, with the directions of comparison (upward, lateral, and downward) manipulated, indicate that upward comparisons with attractive models would strengthen self-improvement motives related to working out. In addition, pleasant affective responses to the images and one’s self-efficacy for working out were also significant predictors. However, model attractiveness revealed a negative, direct...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 11, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Receptive versus Interactive Video Screens: A Role for the Brain’s Default Mode Network in Learning from Media
Publication date: Available online 10 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Daniel R. Anderson, Matthew C. DavidsonAbstractRecent neuroscience research has revealed the presence of multiple brain networks underlying functional human psychology. One of these, the default mode network (DMN), has been shown to underlie sustained attention to and comprehension of narrative receptive media such as television. We argue that DMN activation enhances learning of temporal and spatial context and that this type of learning is characteristic of receptive media. We hypothesize that response demands during interactive sc...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 11, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Data protectors, benefit maximizers, or facts enthusiasts: Identifying user profiles for life-logging technologies
Publication date: Available online 8 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Laura Burbach, Chantal Lidynia, Philipp Brauner, Martina ZiefleAbstractSedentary behavior and lack of exercise pose a threat to both individual health and the viability of health-care systems and societies. Portable fitness trackers as prominent persuasive technologies are seen as a way to increase the level of physical activity. Yet, despite their technical capabilities, their affordability, and their advantages in regard to increased physical activity, they are neither used across the population, nor for long periods of time. To un...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 9, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Are Males More likely to be Addicted to the Internet than Females? A Meta-Analysis Involving 34 Global Jurisdictions
Publication date: Available online 7 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Wenliang Su, Xiaoli Han, Cheng Jin, Yan Yan, Marc N. PotenzaAbstractInternet addiction (IA) is prevalent and associated with negative measures of health functioning, with males appearing more vulnerable than females. However, little is known about gender-related differences in the effect sizes of IA globally. This multinational meta-analysis addresses this gap in knowledge by providing estimates of effect sizes of gender-related differences in IA tendencies across jurisdictions and how they relate to global national indexes including...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Smartwatch games: Encouraging privacy-protective behaviour in a longitudinal study
Publication date: Available online 8 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Meredydd Williams, Jason R.C. Nurse, Sadie CreeseAbstractWhile the public claim concern for their privacy, they frequently appear to overlook it. This disparity between concern and behaviour is known as the Privacy Paradox. Such issues are particularly prevalent on wearable devices. These products can store personal data, such as text messages and contact details. However, owners rarely use protective features. Educational games can be effective in encouraging changes in behaviour. Therefore, we developed the first privacy game for (...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: August 2019Source: Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 97Author(s): (Source: Computers in Human Behavior)
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

The relations between YouTube addiction, social anxiety and parasocial relationships with YouTubers: A moderated-mediation model based on a cognitive-behavioral framework
Publication date: Available online 6 May 2019Source: Computers in Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Pierre de Bérail, Marlène Guillon, Catherine BungenerAbstractYouTube is a popular video-sharing platform where viewers can watch videos made by media performers called YouTubers. YouTube is a social network site conducive to the development of parasocial relationships, which consists in asymmetrical relationships between media users and media performers. The aim of this study is to identify the determinants of YouTube addiction by examining the relationships between social anxiety, parasocial relationships with YouTuber...
Source: Computers in Human Behavior - May 6, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: research