Isolation of < em > Mycoplasma iowae < /em > in turkey flocks with skeletal abnormalities: a retrospective study
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 15:1-22. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1914816. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTMycoplasma iowae is a pathogen affecting the turkey industry which is commonly associated with decreased hatchability and leg abnormalities in the young progeny. This Mycoplasma was in the spotlight more in the past than today since its prevalence has been decreasing over time. Reports of M. iowae in turkeys showing reduced growth performances, leg problems and skeletal abnormalities are scarce although there is no report whether this pathogen has been completely eradicated in commercial turkeys. Additionally, there is no comp...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 15, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Marco Bottinelli Elisabetta Stefani Andrea Matucci Mauro Dal Pr à Katia Capello Alessandro Zotti Salvatore Catania Source Type: research

Isolation of < em > Mycoplasma iowae < /em > in turkey flocks with skeletal abnormalities: a retrospective study
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 15:1-22. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1914816. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTMycoplasma iowae is a pathogen affecting the turkey industry which is commonly associated with decreased hatchability and leg abnormalities in the young progeny. This Mycoplasma was in the spotlight more in the past than today since its prevalence has been decreasing over time. Reports of M. iowae in turkeys showing reduced growth performances, leg problems and skeletal abnormalities are scarce although there is no report whether this pathogen has been completely eradicated in commercial turkeys. Additionally, there is no comp...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 15, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Marco Bottinelli Elisabetta Stefani Andrea Matucci Mauro Dal Pr à Katia Capello Alessandro Zotti Salvatore Catania Source Type: research

Spotlight on avian pathology: < em > Eimeria < /em > and the disease coccidiosis
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-9. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoccidiosis caused by Eimeria species parasites remains a major threat to poultry production, undermining economic performance and compromising welfare. The recent characterisation of three new Eimeria species that infect chickens has highlighted that many gaps remain in our knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of these parasites. Concerns about the use of anticoccidial drugs, widespread parasite drug resistance, the need for vaccines that can be used across broiler as well as layer and breeder sectors, and consumer prefere...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Damer P Blake Virginia Marugan-Hernandez Fiona M Tomley Source Type: research

An unusual case of hemorrhagic bursa in a pullet flock associated with a genogroup 2 infectious bursal disease virus
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912287. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSUMMARYAn unusual case of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was observed in eight-week-old commercial caged pullets. This flock (House 1) exhibited a one-day spike in mortality. On gross necropsy examination, enlarged, diffusely hemorrhagic bursas were observed. This lesion has been frequently described in cases of very virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (vvIBDV). A five-week-old caged pullet flock (House 2) in an adjacent building did not display hemorrhagic bursa lesions. Microscopic examination of bursas from the eight-w...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Jessica Higgins Eva Wallner-Pendleton Linda Michel Daral Jackwood Source Type: research

Spotlight on avian pathology: < em > Eimeria < /em > and the disease coccidiosis
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-9. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoccidiosis caused by Eimeria species parasites remains a major threat to poultry production, undermining economic performance and compromising welfare. The recent characterisation of three new Eimeria species that infect chickens has highlighted that many gaps remain in our knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of these parasites. Concerns about the use of anticoccidial drugs, widespread parasite drug resistance, the need for vaccines that can be used across broiler as well as layer and breeder sectors, and consumer prefere...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Damer P Blake Virginia Marugan-Hernandez Fiona M Tomley Source Type: research

An unusual case of hemorrhagic bursa in a pullet flock associated with a genogroup 2 infectious bursal disease virus
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912287. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSUMMARYAn unusual case of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was observed in eight-week-old commercial caged pullets. This flock (House 1) exhibited a one-day spike in mortality. On gross necropsy examination, enlarged, diffusely hemorrhagic bursas were observed. This lesion has been frequently described in cases of very virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (vvIBDV). A five-week-old caged pullet flock (House 2) in an adjacent building did not display hemorrhagic bursa lesions. Microscopic examination of bursas from the eight-w...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Jessica Higgins Eva Wallner-Pendleton Linda Michel Daral Jackwood Source Type: research

Spotlight on avian pathology: < em > Eimeria < /em > and the disease coccidiosis
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-9. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoccidiosis caused by Eimeria species parasites remains a major threat to poultry production, undermining economic performance and compromising welfare. The recent characterisation of three new Eimeria species that infect chickens has highlighted that many gaps remain in our knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of these parasites. Concerns about the use of anticoccidial drugs, widespread parasite drug resistance, the need for vaccines that can be used across broiler as well as layer and breeder sectors, and consumer prefere...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Damer P Blake Virginia Marugan-Hernandez Fiona M Tomley Source Type: research

An unusual case of hemorrhagic bursa in a pullet flock associated with a genogroup 2 infectious bursal disease virus
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912287. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSUMMARYAn unusual case of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was observed in eight-week-old commercial caged pullets. This flock (House 1) exhibited a one-day spike in mortality. On gross necropsy examination, enlarged, diffusely hemorrhagic bursas were observed. This lesion has been frequently described in cases of very virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (vvIBDV). A five-week-old caged pullet flock (House 2) in an adjacent building did not display hemorrhagic bursa lesions. Microscopic examination of bursas from the eight-w...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Jessica Higgins Eva Wallner-Pendleton Linda Michel Daral Jackwood Source Type: research

Spotlight on avian pathology: < em > Eimeria < /em > and the disease coccidiosis
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-9. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoccidiosis caused by Eimeria species parasites remains a major threat to poultry production, undermining economic performance and compromising welfare. The recent characterisation of three new Eimeria species that infect chickens has highlighted that many gaps remain in our knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of these parasites. Concerns about the use of anticoccidial drugs, widespread parasite drug resistance, the need for vaccines that can be used across broiler as well as layer and breeder sectors, and consumer prefere...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Damer P Blake Virginia Marugan-Hernandez Fiona M Tomley Source Type: research

An unusual case of hemorrhagic bursa in a pullet flock associated with a genogroup 2 infectious bursal disease virus
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912287. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSUMMARYAn unusual case of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was observed in eight-week-old commercial caged pullets. This flock (House 1) exhibited a one-day spike in mortality. On gross necropsy examination, enlarged, diffusely hemorrhagic bursas were observed. This lesion has been frequently described in cases of very virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (vvIBDV). A five-week-old caged pullet flock (House 2) in an adjacent building did not display hemorrhagic bursa lesions. Microscopic examination of bursas from the eight-w...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Jessica Higgins Eva Wallner-Pendleton Linda Michel Daral Jackwood Source Type: research

Spotlight on avian pathology: < em > Eimeria < /em > and the disease coccidiosis
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-9. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoccidiosis caused by Eimeria species parasites remains a major threat to poultry production, undermining economic performance and compromising welfare. The recent characterisation of three new Eimeria species that infect chickens has highlighted that many gaps remain in our knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of these parasites. Concerns about the use of anticoccidial drugs, widespread parasite drug resistance, the need for vaccines that can be used across broiler as well as layer and breeder sectors, and consumer prefere...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Damer P Blake Virginia Marugan-Hernandez Fiona M Tomley Source Type: research

An unusual case of hemorrhagic bursa in a pullet flock associated with a genogroup 2 infectious bursal disease virus
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912287. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSUMMARYAn unusual case of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was observed in eight-week-old commercial caged pullets. This flock (House 1) exhibited a one-day spike in mortality. On gross necropsy examination, enlarged, diffusely hemorrhagic bursas were observed. This lesion has been frequently described in cases of very virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (vvIBDV). A five-week-old caged pullet flock (House 2) in an adjacent building did not display hemorrhagic bursa lesions. Microscopic examination of bursas from the eight-w...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Jessica Higgins Eva Wallner-Pendleton Linda Michel Daral Jackwood Source Type: research

Spotlight on avian pathology: < em > Eimeria < /em > and the disease coccidiosis
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-9. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoccidiosis caused by Eimeria species parasites remains a major threat to poultry production, undermining economic performance and compromising welfare. The recent characterisation of three new Eimeria species that infect chickens has highlighted that many gaps remain in our knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of these parasites. Concerns about the use of anticoccidial drugs, widespread parasite drug resistance, the need for vaccines that can be used across broiler as well as layer and breeder sectors, and consumer prefere...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Damer P Blake Virginia Marugan-Hernandez Fiona M Tomley Source Type: research

An unusual case of hemorrhagic bursa in a pullet flock associated with a genogroup 2 infectious bursal disease virus
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912287. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSUMMARYAn unusual case of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was observed in eight-week-old commercial caged pullets. This flock (House 1) exhibited a one-day spike in mortality. On gross necropsy examination, enlarged, diffusely hemorrhagic bursas were observed. This lesion has been frequently described in cases of very virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (vvIBDV). A five-week-old caged pullet flock (House 2) in an adjacent building did not display hemorrhagic bursa lesions. Microscopic examination of bursas from the eight-w...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Jessica Higgins Eva Wallner-Pendleton Linda Michel Daral Jackwood Source Type: research

Spotlight on avian pathology: < em > Eimeria < /em > and the disease coccidiosis
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-9. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912288. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTCoccidiosis caused by Eimeria species parasites remains a major threat to poultry production, undermining economic performance and compromising welfare. The recent characterisation of three new Eimeria species that infect chickens has highlighted that many gaps remain in our knowledge of the biology and epidemiology of these parasites. Concerns about the use of anticoccidial drugs, widespread parasite drug resistance, the need for vaccines that can be used across broiler as well as layer and breeder sectors, and consumer prefere...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Damer P Blake Virginia Marugan-Hernandez Fiona M Tomley Source Type: research

An unusual case of hemorrhagic bursa in a pullet flock associated with a genogroup 2 infectious bursal disease virus
Avian Pathol. 2021 Apr 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1912287. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSUMMARYAn unusual case of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was observed in eight-week-old commercial caged pullets. This flock (House 1) exhibited a one-day spike in mortality. On gross necropsy examination, enlarged, diffusely hemorrhagic bursas were observed. This lesion has been frequently described in cases of very virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (vvIBDV). A five-week-old caged pullet flock (House 2) in an adjacent building did not display hemorrhagic bursa lesions. Microscopic examination of bursas from the eight-w...
Source: Avian Pathology - April 7, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Jessica Higgins Eva Wallner-Pendleton Linda Michel Daral Jackwood Source Type: research

Deciphering the role of < em > ttrA < /em > and < em > pduA < /em > genes for < em > Salmonella enterica < /em > serovars in a chicken infection model
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-41. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1909703. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSalmonella enterica serovars use intestinal self-induced inflammation to increase electron acceptor availability and to obtain a growth advantage in the host gut. There are evidences suggesting that the ability to use tetrathionate and 1,2-propanediol by Salmonella provides an advantage in murine infection. Thus, we present here the first study to evaluate both systemic infection and faecal excretion in commercial poultry challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (STM) harbouring deletions in ttrA and pduA g...
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Mms Saraiva L B Rodrigues Alves Dfm Monte T S Ferreira V P Benevides F O Barbosa O C Freitas Neto A M Almeida P A Barrow A Berchieri Source Type: research

Retrospective analysis of necrotising typhlitis cases associated with < em > Brachyspira < /em > spp. in British rhea
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-38. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThis work was supported by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) under project ED1300.PMID:33779433 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Harriet McFadzean Alex Schock Emma Stubberfield Roderick M Card Jill Thomson Judith Rohde Laura Murray Elena Velo-Rego Heather Ainsworth Alex M Barlow David Welchman Source Type: research

Deciphering the role of < em > ttrA < /em > and < em > pduA < /em > genes for < em > Salmonella enterica < /em > serovars in a chicken infection model
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-41. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1909703. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSalmonella enterica serovars use intestinal self-induced inflammation to increase electron acceptor availability and to obtain a growth advantage in the host gut. There are evidences suggesting that the ability to use tetrathionate and 1,2-propanediol by Salmonella provides an advantage in murine infection. Thus, we present here the first study to evaluate both systemic infection and faecal excretion in commercial poultry challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (STM) harbouring deletions in ttrA and pduA g...
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Mms Saraiva L B Rodrigues Alves Dfm Monte T S Ferreira V P Benevides F O Barbosa O C Freitas Neto A M Almeida P A Barrow A Berchieri Source Type: research

Retrospective analysis of necrotising typhlitis cases associated with < em > Brachyspira < /em > spp. in British rhea
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-38. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThis work was supported by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) under project ED1300.PMID:33779433 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Harriet McFadzean Alex Schock Emma Stubberfield Roderick M Card Jill Thomson Judith Rohde Laura Murray Elena Velo-Rego Heather Ainsworth Alex M Barlow David Welchman Source Type: research

Deciphering the role of < em > ttrA < /em > and < em > pduA < /em > genes for < em > Salmonella enterica < /em > serovars in a chicken infection model
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-41. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1909703. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSalmonella enterica serovars use intestinal self-induced inflammation to increase electron acceptor availability and to obtain a growth advantage in the host gut. There are evidences suggesting that the ability to use tetrathionate and 1,2-propanediol by Salmonella provides an advantage in murine infection. Thus, we present here the first study to evaluate both systemic infection and faecal excretion in commercial poultry challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (STM) harbouring deletions in ttrA and pduA g...
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Mms Saraiva L B Rodrigues Alves Dfm Monte T S Ferreira V P Benevides F O Barbosa O C Freitas Neto A M Almeida P A Barrow A Berchieri Source Type: research

Retrospective analysis of necrotising typhlitis cases associated with < em > Brachyspira < /em > spp. in British rhea
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-38. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThis work was supported by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) under project ED1300.PMID:33779433 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Harriet McFadzean Alex Schock Emma Stubberfield Roderick M Card Jill Thomson Judith Rohde Laura Murray Elena Velo-Rego Heather Ainsworth Alex M Barlow David Welchman Source Type: research

Deciphering the role of < em > ttrA < /em > and < em > pduA < /em > genes for < em > Salmonella enterica < /em > serovars in a chicken infection model
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-41. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1909703. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSalmonella enterica serovars use intestinal self-induced inflammation to increase electron acceptor availability and to obtain a growth advantage in the host gut. There are evidences suggesting that the ability to use tetrathionate and 1,2-propanediol by Salmonella provides an advantage in murine infection. Thus, we present here the first study to evaluate both systemic infection and faecal excretion in commercial poultry challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (STM) harbouring deletions in ttrA and pduA g...
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Mms Saraiva L B Rodrigues Alves Dfm Monte T S Ferreira V P Benevides F O Barbosa O C Freitas Neto A M Almeida P A Barrow A Berchieri Source Type: research

Retrospective analysis of necrotising typhlitis cases associated with < em > Brachyspira < /em > spp. in British rhea
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-38. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThis work was supported by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) under project ED1300.PMID:33779433 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Harriet McFadzean Alex Schock Emma Stubberfield Roderick M Card Jill Thomson Judith Rohde Laura Murray Elena Velo-Rego Heather Ainsworth Alex M Barlow David Welchman Source Type: research

Deciphering the role of < em > ttrA < /em > and < em > pduA < /em > genes for < em > Salmonella enterica < /em > serovars in a chicken infection model
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-41. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1909703. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSalmonella enterica serovars use intestinal self-induced inflammation to increase electron acceptor availability and to obtain a growth advantage in the host gut. There are evidences suggesting that the ability to use tetrathionate and 1,2-propanediol by Salmonella provides an advantage in murine infection. Thus, we present here the first study to evaluate both systemic infection and faecal excretion in commercial poultry challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (STM) harbouring deletions in ttrA and pduA g...
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Mms Saraiva L B Rodrigues Alves Dfm Monte T S Ferreira V P Benevides F O Barbosa O C Freitas Neto A M Almeida P A Barrow A Berchieri Source Type: research

Retrospective analysis of necrotising typhlitis cases associated with < em > Brachyspira < /em > spp. in British rhea
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-38. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThis work was supported by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) under project ED1300.PMID:33779433 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Harriet McFadzean Alex Schock Emma Stubberfield Roderick M Card Jill Thomson Judith Rohde Laura Murray Elena Velo-Rego Heather Ainsworth Alex M Barlow David Welchman Source Type: research

Deciphering the role of < em > ttrA < /em > and < em > pduA < /em > genes for < em > Salmonella enterica < /em > serovars in a chicken infection model
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-41. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1909703. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSalmonella enterica serovars use intestinal self-induced inflammation to increase electron acceptor availability and to obtain a growth advantage in the host gut. There are evidences suggesting that the ability to use tetrathionate and 1,2-propanediol by Salmonella provides an advantage in murine infection. Thus, we present here the first study to evaluate both systemic infection and faecal excretion in commercial poultry challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (STM) harbouring deletions in ttrA and pduA g...
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Mms Saraiva L B Rodrigues Alves Dfm Monte T S Ferreira V P Benevides F O Barbosa O C Freitas Neto A M Almeida P A Barrow A Berchieri Source Type: research

Retrospective analysis of necrotising typhlitis cases associated with < em > Brachyspira < /em > spp. in British rhea
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-38. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThis work was supported by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) under project ED1300.PMID:33779433 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Harriet McFadzean Alex Schock Emma Stubberfield Roderick M Card Jill Thomson Judith Rohde Laura Murray Elena Velo-Rego Heather Ainsworth Alex M Barlow David Welchman Source Type: research

Deciphering the role of < em > ttrA < /em > and < em > pduA < /em > genes for < em > Salmonella enterica < /em > serovars in a chicken infection model
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-41. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1909703. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSalmonella enterica serovars use intestinal self-induced inflammation to increase electron acceptor availability and to obtain a growth advantage in the host gut. There are evidences suggesting that the ability to use tetrathionate and 1,2-propanediol by Salmonella provides an advantage in murine infection. Thus, we present here the first study to evaluate both systemic infection and faecal excretion in commercial poultry challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and S. Typhimurium (STM) harbouring deletions in ttrA and pduA g...
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Mms Saraiva L B Rodrigues Alves Dfm Monte T S Ferreira V P Benevides F O Barbosa O C Freitas Neto A M Almeida P A Barrow A Berchieri Source Type: research

Retrospective analysis of necrotising typhlitis cases associated with < em > Brachyspira < /em > spp. in British rhea
Avian Pathol. 2021 Mar 29:1-38. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThis work was supported by Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) under project ED1300.PMID:33779433 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1907305 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - March 29, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Harriet McFadzean Alex Schock Emma Stubberfield Roderick M Card Jill Thomson Judith Rohde Laura Murray Elena Velo-Rego Heather Ainsworth Alex M Barlow David Welchman Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research

The chicken-derived velogenic Newcastle disease virus can acquire high pathogenicity in domestic ducks via serial passaging
Avian Pathol. 2021 Feb 12:1-43. doi: 10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACT・Chicken-derived NDV acquired high pathogenicity in ducks with serial passaging ・The passaged NDV showed intracerebral and intranasal pathogenicity in ducks ・The passaged NDV is efficiently replicated in systemic tissues in ducks ・Of 11 amino acid substitutions some or all are likely involved in pathogenicity.PMID:33576245 | DOI:10.1080/03079457.2021.1889461 (Source: Avian Pathology)
Source: Avian Pathology - February 12, 2021 Category: Pathology Authors: Chiharu Hidaka Kosuke Soda Fumie Nomura Yukie Kashiwabara Hiroshi Ito Toshihiro Ito Source Type: research