Use of excessive supplemental oxygen in mechanically ventilated patients is based on unit culture. A multiple-methods study  in a regional intensive care unit
Administration of supplemental oxygen is widely used in the management of critically ill patients; however, there is evidence that excessive supplemental oxygen exposure is associated with increased mortality. There is limited research evaluating what factors clinicians take into consideration when managing oxygenation in critically ill adults. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - October 13, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Amber Ellen Livingston, Anastasia F. Hutchinson, Laura Anne Brooks Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Nurses' cognitive and perceptual bias in the identification of clinical deterioration cues
Perception and processing of clinical cues have rarely been investigated in the nursing literature despite their relevance to the early identification and management of clinical deterioration. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - October 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Modi Al-Moteri, Simon Cooper, Mark Symmons, Virginia Plummer Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The courageous practitioner during end-of-life care: Harnessing creativity in everyday acts
There is no doubt that critical care is a complex and demanding clinical area where nurses work alongside patients and families who are exposed to the prospect of death and dying.1 Within this complex milieu, nurses manage challenging end-of-life situations on a daily basis2 and are therefore well placed to make a significant difference to the care of patients who will not survive their critical illness. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - October 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kristen Ranse, Maureen Coombs Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Feasibility, safety, and functional recovery after active rehabilitation in critically ill surgical patients
The characteristics of critically ill surgical patients differ from those of medical patients. Few studies have evaluated rehabilitation in surgical intensive care units (SICUs), particularly in non-Western countries and in elderly patients. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - September 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Yu Jin Seo, Sae Rom Park, Jung Hoon Lee, Chul Jung, Kyoung Hyo Choi, Suk-Kyung Hong, Won Kim Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The fear and risk of community falls in patients following an intensive care admission: An exploratory cohort study
Muscle weakness and impairments in physical functioning are well-recognised sequelae after critical illness. Whether individuals have a higher risk of community falls and a fear of falling has not been examined amongst individuals after critical illness. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - September 6, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: S.M. Parry, L. Denehy, C.L. Granger, J.L. McGinley, D.C. Files, M.J. Berry, S. Dhar, R.N. Bakhru, J.S.T. Larkin, Z.A. Puthucheary, R.A. Clark, P.E. Morris Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

TEMPORARY REMOVAL: Sedatives, analgesics, and antipsychotics in tracheostomised intensive care unit patients – Is less more?
The publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated.The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - September 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Anna-Liisa Sutt, Toni Kinneally, Stephanie Fisquet, John F. Fraser Source Type: research

Sedatives, analgesics, and antipsychotics in tracheostomised intensive care unit patients – Is less more?
Sedation and anaesthesia are used universally to facilitate mechanical ventilation – with larger cumulative doses being used in those with prolonged ventilation. Transitioning from an endotracheal to a tracheostomy tube enables the depth of sedation to be reduced. Early use of speaking valves with tracheostomised patients has become routine in some intensive care units (ICUs). T he return of verbal communication has been observed to improve ease of patient care and increase patient and family engagement, with a perceived reduction in patient agitation. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - September 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Anna-Liisa Sutt, Toni Kinneally, Stephanie Fisquet, John F. Fraser Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Antipyretic treatment does not improve survival of critically ill patients with infection
Although patient care for fever constitutes a core competency for healthcare professionals employed in the intensive care unit (ICU), the continuing controversy about risk –benefit ratio of fever and its management renders antipyretic treatment decisions difficult.1 Considering that fever has evolved as part of the acute-phase response to provide adaptive advantages during infection, its suppression can be detrimental.2 The findings of multicenter observational stud ies conducted on critically ill patients with infection or sepsis have supported the protective role of febrile temperatures because these were asso...
Source: Australian Critical Care - September 4, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Panagiotis Kiekkas, Eleni Michalopoulos, Diamanto Aretha Tags: Discussion paper Source Type: research

A response to the recent well-being systematic review
We would like to thank Jarden, Sandham, Siegert, and Koziol-McLain (2019) for their article entitled “Intensive care nurses' well-being: A systematic review”.1 It was read with great interest as it examines factors contributing to well-being, rather than nurses' ill-being. It importantly addresses the gap in well-being literature, which may propel future studies and development of workplace int erventions. Despite its innovative approach, there were significant methodological issues that may have impacted the conclusions drawn by the authors. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 23, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Rumi Agarwal, Elsa I. Bravo, Purnima Madhivanan, Sarah Taylor-Amador Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Social media for researchers – beyond cat videos, over sharing, and narcissism
Social media has acquired a worldwide presence for increasing research dissemination.1,2 A recent study evaluating the social media strategy of the International Journal of Mental Health found that tweeting twice each day increased the reach and readership of the journal-published manuscripts.3 However, the value and role of social media in critical care nursing have received mixed reception. Love or hate it, social media is a powerful tool for researchers and clinicians providing opportunities to network, diffuse new information, and improve patient outcomes. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 23, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kaye Rolls, Debbie Massey, Rosalind Elliott Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Response to letter to the editor
We would like to thank Agarwal, Bravo, Madhivanan, and Taylor-Amador for the letter (20 March 2019) regarding our review.5 We appreciate your interest in our review and hope you have also had the opportunity to read about some of the work that has evolved from this review;1 –4 As you have highlighted, our review “importantly addresses the gap in well-being literature, which may propel future studies and development of workplace interventions”, and we too are excited about this opportunity. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 23, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Rebecca J. Jarden, Margaret Sandham, Richard J. Siegert, Jane Koziol-McLain Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 23, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Question
Compiled by Marea Reading RN, Consultant Cardiothoracic Nursing Education, Sydney, NSW (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 23, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Chest x-ray quiz Source Type: research

Answer and discussion
Noteworthy is the mid-sternal strip of lucency (arrowed) which is indicative of a dehisced sternum. Sternal dehiscence is the process of separation of the bony sternum, which often is accompanied by mediastinitis (infection of the deep soft tissue).2 Although the sternal wires appear in place, they often do move “wandering sternal wires”.1 For those who nurse patients following cardiac surgery via a medial sternotomy it is essential to be aware of early manifestations of infection in the mediastinum. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 23, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Chest x-ray quiz Source Type: research

Barriers to rehabilitation after critical illness: a survey of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals caring for ICU survivors in an acute care hospital
There is scant literature on the barriers to rehabilitation for patients discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) to acute care wards. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 8, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Sumeet Rai, Lakmali Anthony, Dale M. Needham, Ekavi N. Georgousopoulou, Bindu Sudheer, Rhonda Brown, Imogen Mitchell, Frank van Haren Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Risk prediction models for intensive care unit readmission: A systematic review of methodology and applicability
We conducted a systematic review of primary models to predict intensive care unit (ICU) readmission. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 8, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Nader Markazi-Moghaddam, Mohammad Fathi, Azra Ramezankhani Tags: Review Paper Source Type: research

A comparison of nurses' work satisfaction between single-room and multioccupancy adult intensive care units: A mixed-methods integrative review
To systematically review and compare the evidence for the transition from multi- occupancy adult intensive care units to single room intensive care units. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - August 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kim Oliver, Vivien Kemp Tags: Review Paper Source Type: research

Families ’ perspectives of participation in patient care in an adult intensive care unit: A qualitative study
When a relative is admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), stress, anxiety, and failure to cope may place families, and the patient, at risk for adverse psychological outcomes. Family participation in patient care may improve patient and family outcomes. However, to date, little is known about how families perceive and participate in patient care in ICU, and there is limited research to guide clinicians about supporting family participation in this context. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - July 29, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Pauline Wong, Bernice Redley, Robin Digby, Anu Correya, Tracey Bucknall Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Technical and contextual barriers to oral care: New insights from intensive care unit nurses and health care professionals
Oral care for intubated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) is known to reduce bacterial colonization in oropharyngeal cavities decrease development of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) and the associated costs of managing this complication (1-4). Provision of oral hygiene by nurses is a fundamental aspect of care in the ICU (5). However, such a basic nursing activity can be devalued or rendered invisible by nurses when there is a greater emphasis on managing and maintaining biotechnology and/or a failure to underpin practice with research evidence that demonstrates the importance of fundamental care (5). (Source...
Source: Australian Critical Care - July 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Joanne Harmon, Carol Grech Source Type: research

Burnout and devastated feeling on patient's death: Universal to clinicians
Rodorigues-Rey et  al.1 demonstrated a high prevalence of burnout of paediatric intensive care staff. The following three findings attracted our attention: (i) patient's death increased staff's burnout, (ii) prevalence of burnout did not differ between paediatric critical vs. noncritical ward staff, and (iii) burnou t emerged after conflicts with families or colleagues. We have some addition and clarification. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Shigeki Matsubara, Daisuke Matsubara, Teppei Matsubara Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Educating the critical care nurse of the future
Critical care nursing is a specialist area of nursing practice, and appropriate preparation is vital to the provision of quality care. Informed by the Declaration of Madrid as a baseline for critical care education, formalised critical care nursing education has been developed and is seen as central to the appropriate preparation of knowledgeable and skilled critical care nurses. While education of the critical care workforce was initially delivered in the work place and consisted of ad hoc training of nurses and doctors together, more formalised postregistration education was developed in the 1960s in both Australia and t...
Source: Australian Critical Care - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Andrea P. Marshall Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Question
Compiled by Marea Reading RN, Consultant Cardiothoracic Nursing Education Sydney NSW (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Chest x-ray quiz Source Type: research

Answer and discussion
You would be happy with: (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Chest x-ray quiz Source Type: research

The interaction of subglottic drainage, cuff pressure, and oral care on endotracheal tube fluid leakage: A benchtop study
The types of endotracheal tube, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) level, endotracheal tube cuff pressure level, and nursing activity may influence the occurrence of pulmonary aspiration in ventilated patients with an endotracheal tube, but the evidence on their degree of influence is still inconclusive. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - June 24, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Sek Ying Chair, David Wing Keung Chan, Xi Cao Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Insertion, management, and complications associated with arterial catheters in paediatric intensive care: A clinical audit
Peripheral arterial catheters (PAC) are used for haemodynamic monitoring and blood sampling in paediatric critical care. Limited data are available regarding PAC insertion and management practices, and how they relate to device function and failure. This information is necessary to inform future interventional research. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - June 11, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jessica A. Schults, Debbie Long, Kylie Pearson, Mari Takashima, Thimitra Baveas, Luregn J. Schlapbach, Fiona Macfarlane, Amanda J. Ullman Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

End-of-life care content in postgraduate critical care nursing programs: Structured telephone interviews to evaluate content-informing practice
The provision of end-of-life care remains a significant component of work for clinicians in critical care settings. Critical care nurses report that this area of practice receives limited attention in education and training. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - June 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kristen Ranse, Lori Delaney, Jamie Ranse, Fiona Coyer, Patsy Yates Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Exploring staff perceptions of organ donation after circulatory death
Solid organ donation remains low in Australia; however, donation after circulatory death (DCD) bolsters rates and is associated with good short- and long-term clinical outcomes among recipients, especially in lung and kidney recipients. However, its reintroduction is met with resistance within hospitals. The aim of the present study was to develop a greater understanding of DCD perceptions among staff involved. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Luke A. Milross, Thomas G. O'Donnell, Tracey K. Bucknall, David V. Pilcher, Joshua F. Ihle Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in critically ill patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NES) on prevention of critical care myopathy and its effect on various clinical outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU). (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Y. Zayed, B. Kheiri, M. Barbarawi, A. Chahine, L. Rashdan, S. Chintalapati, G. Bachuwa, I. Al-Sanouri Tags: Review paper Source Type: research

A comparison of manual pupil examination versus an automated pupillometer in a specialised neurosciences intensive care unit
The assessment of pupil size and reaction to light is a fundamental part of the neurological assessment; however, manual examination is prone to inaccuracies. The use of an automated infrared pupillometer is one strategy to limit error in pupil examination. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Joshua Smith, Oliver Flower, Ashleigh Tracey, Phil Johnson Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The needs of patients with post –intensive care syndrome: A prospective, observational study
The needs of critical illness survivors  and how best to address these are unclear. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Edward Heydon, Bradley Wibrow, Angela Jacques, Ravikiran Sonawane, Matthew Anstey Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The effect of physical restraint on neurovascular complications in intensive care units
To reduce the neurovascular complications caused by physical restraint in intensive care patients, there is a need to examine the occurrence of neurovascular complications and their rate. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 9, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: B üşra Ertuğrul, Dilek Özden Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Living with uncertainty in clinical research
Three decades ago, the CNSA Journal, which today is Australian Critical Care, began as a periodical to inform specialist nurses, particularly those working in critical care areas, about clinical practice. Over the years, submissions to the journal have changed considerably. Initially, many of the articles published were opinion pieces, reflections on personal experiences and professional communications. However, in the past decade, there has been an increased shift towards publication of original research or reviews of original research. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Andrea P. Marshall Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Barriers to implementing expert safety recommendations for early mobilisation in intensive care unit during mechanical ventilation: A prospective observational study
Multiple choice questions (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Question
Compiled by Marea Reading RN, Consultant Cardiothoracic Nursing Education Sydney NSW (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Chest x-ray quiz Source Type: research

Answer and discussion
You should note: (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Chest x-ray quiz Source Type: research

Pragmatic development of an evidence-based intensive care unit –specific falls risk assessment tool: The Tyndall Bailey Falls Risk Assessment Tool
Falls may result in significant patient harm. A recommended strategy to prevent falls is the use of a falls risk assessment tool, but these tools are often specific for older people. Evidence suggests context-specific tools are more effective. Although a rare event in the intensive care unit (ICU), patients in the ICU are at high risk of falling. The primary trigger for the current study was an increase in falls in the study ICU. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - April 15, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Allison Tyndall, Rachel Bailey, Rosalind Elliott Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

A checklist for intrahospital transport of critically ill patients improves compliance with transportation safety guidelines
Critically ill patients are often transferred from the intensive care unit (ICU) to other locations around the hospital during which adverse events, some life threatening, are common. An intercollegiate guideline covering the transport of critically ill patients exists in Australasia; however, compliance with this guideline has previously been shown to be poor, and its role in improving safety in transportation of patients in the ICU is unknown. We performed a pre –post interventional study in a tertiary metropolitan ICU, assessing the impact of the introduction of a transport checklist on guideline compliance. (Sour...
Source: Australian Critical Care - April 10, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Peter Williams, Sathappan Karuppiah, Kate Greentree, Jai Darvall Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The efficacy of twelve early warning systems for potential use in regional medical facilities in Queensland, Australia
This study evaluates 12 EWSs for use in regional subcritical hospitals. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - April 9, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Marie Danielle Le Lagadec, Trudy Dwyer, Matthew Browne Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Early mobilisation of ventilated patients in the intensive care unit: A  survey of critical care clinicians in an Australian tertiary hospital
Mobilising mechanically ventilated patients is safe and beneficial  and improves outcomes. However, early mobilisation is not widely practiced and barriers to its implementation still exist. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 29, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Frances Lin, Sonja Phelan, Wendy Chaboyer, Marion Mitchell Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Evaluation of a patient and family activated escalation system: Ryan's Rule
This study aimed to access clinicians' and activators' experiences to develop an understanding of the incidence, contributing factors, and outcomes surrounding Ryan's Rule activations. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Trudy A. Dwyer, Tracy Flenady, Julie Kahl, Loretto Quinney Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Contextual factors to registered nurse research utilisation in an Australian adult metropolitan tertiary intensive care unit: A descriptive study
Organisational and unit-level context can have a significant impact on implementation of evidence in practice, the latter being particularly important in the complex intensive care context. Evaluating the context may allow modifiable characteristics to be identified and addressed. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Anna Grant, Fiona Coyer Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

An observational study investigating the use of patient-owned technology to quantify physical activity in survivors of critical illness
Physical activity after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge is challenging to measure but could inform research and practice. A patient's smartphone may provide a novel method to quantify physical activity. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 14, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Samuel Gluck, Matthew James Summers, Mark Edward Finnis, Alice Andrawos, Thomas Paul Goddard, Carol Lynette Hodgson, Theodore John Iwashyna, Adam Michael Deane Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Training in communication skills, end-of-life care, and coping strategies as the key to preventing burnout in clinicians
We thank the authors of the letter to the Editor entitled “Burnout and devastated feeling on patients' death: Universal to clinicians” for their thoughtful comments on the article by Rodríguez-Rey et al.1 and for raising the important point of emotional distress of clinicians resulting from patients' deaths, irrespective of the medical specialty. The ir comments are fully coherent with the conclusions of the study by Rodríguez-Rey et al.,1 with the literature in the field2,3, and with their clinical experience, as well as with our own experience. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 13, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Roc ío Rodríguez-Rey, Alba Palacios, Jesús Alonso-Tapia Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Implementation of a nurse-driven ventilation weaning protocol in critically ill children: Can it improve patient outcome?
Critically ill children treated with invasive mechanical ventilation in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) may suffer from complications leading to prolonged duration of ventilation and PICU stay. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Anita Duyndam, Robert Jan Houmes, Joost van Rosmalen, Dick Tibboel, Monique van Dijk, Erwin Ista Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Acute cervical spinal cord injury and extubation failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Respiratory complications are the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality in acute cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). The prevalence of extubation failure (EF) and factors associated with it are unclear. This research aimed to systematically synthesise and pool literature describing EF and associated risk factors in acute CSCI. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Miles Wilson, Marc Nickels, Brooke Wadsworth, Peter Kruger, Adam Semciw Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Patient experience of necrotising soft-tissue infection from diagnosis to six months after intensive care unit stay: A qualitative content analysis
Necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI) is a severe, life-threatening condition requiring immediate diagnosis and treatment to avoid widespread tissue destruction and death. Current research seeks to explain the complex interaction between patient and disease agent, whereas only few studies have addressed the patient perspective. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Ann-Mari Fagerdahl, Vibeke E. Knudsen, Ingrid Egerod, Annette E. Andersson Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The lived experience of delirium in intensive care unit patients: A  meta-ethnography
The objectives were to interpretatively synthesise qualitative findings on patients' lived experience of delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU)  and to identify meanings and potential existential issues that affect them during and after their experience. Patients may face existential challenges when they are vulnerable in their confusion, all while confronting the reality of their mortality in the critically ill state. (Source: Australian Critical Care)
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 11, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Damaris Gaete Ortega, Elizabeth Papathanassoglou, Colleen M. Norris Tags: Review Paper Source Type: research

Inspiratory muscle training can be monitored by electrical impedance tomography
We read with interest the article by Bissett et  al. using the high-intensity approach for inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation.1 Because IMT does not necessarily improve clinical outcomes,2 Bissett et al. proposed a list of indications when to apply IMT including patients awareness, fraction of in spired oxygen, and respiratory rate, which are not direct measures of muscle activities. The training intensity can be monitored with maximum inspiratory pressure, which needs to be measured invasively through the tracheostomy or using an endotracheal tube and not suitable...
Source: Australian Critical Care - March 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Zhanqi Zhao, Inez Frerichs, Mei-Yun Chang, Knut M öller Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research