Embodied apocalypse: or the native cosmology of late modern social theory.
This article argues that the connection between a life at sea and life in the Brethren is a search for 'signs of the times' - in storms, hauls of prawns, EU fisheries legislation, and so on - which, when taken together, collectively evidence to the Brethren the fact that the end of the world is near. More than this, by extending the eschatological observations of my informants, I want to suggest that this kind of apocalyptic sign searching can also be seen as a feature of what some social theorists - most prominent among them, Ulrich Beck, Anthony Giddens, Scott Lash, and Zygmunt Bauman - refer to as 'late' or 'liquid' mod...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Hegemony versus pluralism: Ayurveda and the Movement for Global Mental Health.
This study examines efforts by ayurvedic practitioners to expand access to ayurvedic mental health services in Kerala, and profiles a rehabilitation center which combines biomedical and ayurvedic therapies and has been a key player in efforts to expand the use of Ayurveda for mental health. The paper argues for maintaining a pluralistic healing environment for treating mental illness rather than displacing other healing modalities in favor of a biomedical psychiatric approach. PMID: 32873052 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - September 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

The emergence of new medical pluralism: the case study of Estonian medical doctor and spiritual teacher Luule Viilma.
Authors: Uibu M Abstract Rather than the harmonious coexistence of different therapeutic practices and meaning systems, medical pluralism involves the contestation of norms and meanings related to legitimacy and authority. The implicit cultural norms that shape local understandings of health and legitimate healing methods become more during periods of social and cultural change. This paper demonstrates the contested nature of medical pluralism based on the case study of one significant figure, Estonian gynaecologist and spiritual teacher Luule Viilma. Well-known to the public as a trailblazer and prominent spokespe...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - August 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Critical ethnographic respect: womens' narratives, material conditions, and emergency contraception in India.
Authors: Appleton NS Abstract Emergency Contraceptive Pills (ECPs) are increasingly available over the counter as a form of hormonal birth control in India. As use of ECPs is increasing over time, this paper draws on ethnographic research in Dehradun, in Uttarakhand (Northern State) to highlight the everyday material conditions under which women create narrative around choice and agency regarding these ECPs. Women viewed ECPs as better options than abortion, appreciated the sense of empowerment these provided them because they could be consumed in houses where women had limited 'space and privacy;' and finally that...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

What drives distress? Rethinking the roles of emotion and diagnosis among people with diabetes in Nairobi, Kenya.
Authors: Mendenhall E, Musau A, Bosire E, Mutiso V, Ndetei D, Rock M Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a condition that both results from and produces social and psychological suffering. As 'diabetes' increases among low income patients in poorer nations, new challenges arise that drive, co-occur, and result from the condition. In this article, we describe how social suffering produces diabetes by way of addressing the varied social, psychological, and biological factors that drive diabetes and are reflected in diabetes experiences among patients seeking care at a public hospital in Nairobi, Kenya. We recruited ...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

'Fixing my life': young people's everyday efforts towards recovery from persistent bodily complaints.
This study aims to explore the experiences and strategies of young Norwegians related to incipient and persistent health complaints affecting everyday life functioning. The study draws on field notes, video material and interview transcripts from a multi-sited ethnographic study of healthcare services and select schools in a small Norwegian town between 2015 and 2016. A central theme is the emphasis upon social and existential constraints seemingly framed by a social imaginary of youth rather than a medical imaginary, and their active engagements to 'fix' their lives through what we identify as two main modalities of self-...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Searching for a feeling once felt: narratives of alcohol and health among Japanese immigrants in Hawai'i.
Authors: Chapman CR Abstract This paper discusses notions of health in alcohol use among new Japanese immigrants in a Japanese pub in Honolulu, Hawai'i. Japanese-style pubs are a space mediating sociability and subjective health through alcohol consumption, a symbol of good health. In the context of the pub, Japanese immigrants form strong intragroup bonds reinforcing a therapeutic narrative; the sensory experience created through social drinking offers a method of resolving stress, validating affect, and positively shaping well-being. However, positive health outcomes are stratified by social position, gender, and...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - July 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Nafsiyat Intercultural Therapy Centre remembers Lennox Thomas.
Authors: Patel G, Güngör D PMID: 32586119 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - June 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

More than a teachable moment: Black lives matter.
Authors: Sobo EJ, Lambert H, Heath CD PMID: 32580573 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - June 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

A phenomenological ethnography of radiology: exploring  the enactive and intersubjective aspects of radiological praxis.
A phenomenological ethnography of radiology: exploring the enactive and intersubjective aspects of radiological praxis. Anthropol Med. 2020 Jun 25;:1-21 Authors: Briedis M Abstract This paper presents qualitative field research conducted at a radiology department in the USA. It examines 'the radiologist at work' and analyses the intersubjective ground for her individual diagnostic intentions and personalized strategies for enacting diagnostically-relevant experiences via imaging technology. The paper incorporates the radiologists' use of 'enactive proofs'-observations and professional memorie...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - June 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Bodily intimacy and ritual healing in women'stantric retreats.
Authors: Plancke C Abstract Alternative health care and holistic spiritual practices have become increasingly popular in many Western countries, especially among women, who often claim them to be deeply transformative. This paper presents an ethnographic study of women's tantric retreats in Northwest Europe that aimed to help women reconnect with their vital sexual energy, rediscover the sacredness of their female bodies, and possibly heal from damaging and even traumatic experiences regarding their femininity and sexuality. It draws on Turner's influential view on ritual as a liminal space in order to account for ...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

'If I don't take care of myself, who will?' Self-caring subjects in Oaxaca's mutual-aid groups.
Authors: Montesi L Abstract Based on seven months of ethnographic fieldwork in two urban health centres in Oaxaca City, Mexico, this paper analyses the ways in which underprivileged middle-aged and older female patients experience and transform grupos de ayuda mutua (GAMs), or mutual-aid groups, a public health programme aimed at improving chronic patients' adherence to their biomedical treatments. GAMs work as 'technologies of the self' within the context of the Mexican neoliberal regime and patients are urged to be self-responsible. GAM members regard such urging favourably and act according to their broader unde...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - May 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Contested legitimacy for anthropologists involved in medical humanitarian action: experiences from the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola epidemic.
Authors: Lees S, Palmer J, Procureur F, Blanchet K Abstract The growing involvement of anthropologists in medical humanitarian response efforts has laid bare the moral and ethical consequences that emerge from humanitarian action. Anthropologists are well placed to examine the social, political, cultural and economic dimensions that influence the spread of diseases, and the ways in which to respond to epidemics. Anthropologists are also, with care, able to turn a critical lens on medical humanitarian response. However, there remains some resistance to involving anthropologists in response activities in the field. D...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Flower boys and muscled men: comparing South Korean and American male body ideals using cultural domain analysis.
This study shows that Americans and South Koreans often overlap in their assessments of the desirability of male bodily features; however, they also strongly endorse many differing features, as well as similar features for different cultural reasons. For example, Americans endorse muscularity because it indexes physical prowess and health; South Koreans only sometimes endorse muscularity, mainly as an aesthetic choice. As a result, psychometric tools for measuring body dissatisfaction that are uncritically adopted for use in cross-cultural research may miss important information affecting the validity of findings and the e...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - May 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Are migration routes disease transmission routes? Understanding Hepatitis and HIV transmission amongst undocumented Pakistani migrants and asylum seekers in a Parisian suburb.
Authors: Khan N, Cailhol J Abstract Drawing on hospital-based interviews and fieldwork in a deprived Parisian suburb, this paper analyses the spatio-temporal dynamics of risk, exposure, and mobilities in individual stories of undocumented Pakistani male migrants, and asylum seekers-receiving treatment for single and combined diagnoses of HIV, and Hepatitis C and B. Inviting alignments with the 'sexual' turn in mobility studies, it prioritises the interface of all-male undocumented migration, mobility, sexuality, and homosociality in circumscribing disease transmission geneaologies. It questions the extent to which ...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - April 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Neurochemistry and subjunctivities of depression in Kerala, South India.
Authors: Lang C Abstract The narrative of depression as a neurochemical imbalance in the brain or, more precisely, a deficiency of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine - largely produced by commercial interests of the international and national pharmaceutical industry and spread globally by international diagnostic systems - has found its way into the offices of mainstream psychiatrists in Kerala. In the clinical encounters, social, economic and existential suffering is thus transformed into a medical condition, treatable with pharmacological means. On the one hand, the setting of a psychiatric outpat...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - April 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Networks as culture: understanding and accounting for risks within networks of medico-social actors.
Authors: Arborio S, Strzykala J, Toniolo AM, Deforge H, Lotte L, Hascoët JM Abstract The anthropological part of the present research project addresses the issue of risk and uncertainties relating to perinatality and disability, and draws from the discourses of professionals in a perinatal network in the French Lorraine region. From an anthropological point of view, it is necessary to determine how and to what extent the views of professionals determine the network's management policies. The place conferred to 'the user' in these representations is one of several important issues to be analysed in order to gai...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - February 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

The narrative paradox of the BRCA gene: an ethnographic study in the clinical encounters of ovarian cancer patients.
Authors: Therond C, Lanceley A, Gibbon S, Rahman B Abstract In this era of personalisation a patient's molecular profile plays an increasingly central role in development and delivery of personalised medicine. This paper sets out to explore the sociocultural implications of mainstreaming BRCA genetic testing in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer patients, who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. It draws on ethnographic research conducted by between April-June 2016 in a large tertiary London hospital. Participant observation was conducted across two sites. For the first two weeks participant observation was ...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - February 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Men with cancer and their experiences of marital relationships: a struggle for control and balance.
Authors: Hansen HP, Tjørnhøj-Thomsen T Abstract Presently, there is a general understanding that health, illness and rehabilitation should be studied in a relational context, and that people's experiences, perceptions and practices in relation to health and recovery are formed relationally and contextually. The aim of this paper is to consider and discuss how men experienced their marital relationships, after being diagnosed with cancer. The empirical material is based on the authors' ethnographic fieldworks, including participant observation and interviews with men who have or have had cancer. The an...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Medical pluralism in the aftermath of cancer health seeking actions and cancer patients' shaping of trajectories to healing.
Authors: Hansen F, Berntsen GR, Salamonsen A Abstract Improved treatment methods for cancer are increasing the number of survivals in Norway. In turn, the group of people struggling with late effects after the treatment is growing. Late effects could be physical, psychological or existential conditions caused by treatment or the experience of illness. This qualitative study explores health-seeking actions among nine Norwegian people with cancer, and how they shape their trajectories to healing. Various health-seeking actions were identified through content analysis, and categorized as conventional, CAM, self-care, ...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Evaluating herbal medicine preparation from a traditional perspective: insights from an ethnopharmaceutical survey in the Peruvian Amazon.
Authors: Tresca G, Marcus O, Politi M Abstract The field of medical ethnobotany has historically contributed to the advancement of modern pharmaceutical and biomedical science through bringing discoveries from the field into the laboratory. In ethnopharmacology, a sub-field of ethnobotany, there is a concerning lack of ethnographic methods reported in the literature. The ethnographic approach is essential for detailing traditional methods of preparation and administration of plant medicines, yet pharmaceutical researchers overemphasize western epistemologies of medicinal discovery and production. In the present wor...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Searching for a 'new magical world': the contradictions of CAM and new age therapies in the West.
Authors: Riccò I Abstract Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and New Age therapies (NAt) are increasingly widespread in the West. Although the variety of therapies they recommend is very extensive, as is the variety of beliefs and practices, there are common ideas shared across both such as the concept of holism and the notion of energy. The case studies examined in this paper, Vittorio and Sol, both suffered from severe personal problems that caused a state of general malaise. They managed to address them through the holistic world. Through their experiences, it is possible to highlight the contr...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

When my four-year-old got cancer: a retrospective on resilience in a paediatric oncology ward.
Authors: Beeler DM Abstract The author presents an interpersonal experience between the author and her son during childhood cancer treatment and care, illustrating the complex relationship between childhood cancer and the term 'resilience'. During treatment and care, nurses used the term 'resilience' in an apparent attempt to reassure her. However, the author found that the concept distanced her from her and her son's experience, creating emotional distress for him. She discovered that the everyday use of resilience, devoid of its research connotations, has the potential to create barriers in understanding these ex...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - December 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Struggling bodies at the border: migration, violence and HIV vulnerability in the Mexico/Guatemala border region.
Authors: Muñoz Martínez R, Fernández Casanueva C, González O, Morales Miranda S, Brouwer KC Abstract The Mexico-Guatemala border is the site of significant movement of people whose principal destination is the USA. The first step, to cross Mexico, is considered as one of the most dangerous routes in the world for undocumented migrants. For some male migrants and displaced persons from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, initiating sex work in the Mexican border city of Tapachula has become a way to earn money to survive during the trip northward - providing funds to keep traveling and d...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - December 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

The cultural construction of preterm birth in the United States.
Authors: Bronstein JM Abstract This commentary explores four features of the cultural construction of pregnancy and childbirth in the United States: risk categorization as an aspect of reproductive governance, medicalization, intensive mothering with its implications for gender stratification, and the definition of personhood as beginning at conception. The cultural construction of preterm births (those that end before gestation is complete at about 37 weeks) is interwoven with beliefs about risk in pregnancy. Health risk categories overlap with socially stigmatized characteristics and behaviors, opening sub...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - November 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Medical anthropology and symbolic cure: from the placebo to cultures of meaningful healing.
Authors: Apud I, Romaní O Abstract The perspectives of medical anthropology on symbolic cure are crucial for understanding placebo mechanisms on the medical agenda. However, while classic biomedical conceptions of the placebo discredited cultural factors as legitimate therapeutic tools, the anthropological critical approach confronted this perspective in the opposite way, rejecting the role of neurobiological factors, and using culture as a self-contained phenomenon. This manuscript is a review of the symbolic healing, stressing the importance of an integrated and interdisciplinary study of the placebo respo...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - October 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

When deservingness policies converge: US immigration enforcement, health reform and patient dumping.
Authors: Kline N Abstract As immigration and health policy continue to be contentious topics globally, anthropologists must examine how policy creates notions of health-related deservingness, which may have broad consequences. This paper explores hidden relationships between immigration enforcement laws and the most recent health reform law in the United States, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), which excludes immigrants from certain types of health services. Findings in this paper show how increasingly harsh immigration enforcement efforts provide health facilities a 'license to discriminate' a...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - September 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Patient and clinician communication practices during the DSM-5 cultural formulation interview field trial.
Authors: Aggarwal NK, Cedeno K, Lewis-Fernandez R Abstract Cultural psychiatrists and medical anthropologists have collaborated to help clinicians screen for culture-related issues in patient explanatory models of illness and to enhance the clinical processes of engagement, diagnosis, and treatment planning. This effort prioritises patient perspectives on suffering and healing to counter the trend of symptom-based interviews which assume biologically determined models of mental disorders. The 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes the Cultural Formulation Interview...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - September 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Facets of clinical stigma after attempted suicide in Mumbai, India.
Authors: Weiss MG, Parkar SR Abstract Community stigma studies may neglect clinically relevant experience and views of stigma that are important features of mental health problems. After attempting suicide, patients in a hospital emergency ward in Mumbai, India, were assessed for stigma referring to underlying prior problems motivating their deliberate self-harm (DSH) event, the DSH event itself and serious mental illness generally based on both anticipated community views and distinctive personal views. In this cultural epidemiological study of 196 patients, assessment items and four corresponding indexes were ana...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - September 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Monitoring the body: grandmothers' ability to provide 'expert' care for grandchildren living with HIV in northwest Tanzania.
Authors: de Klerk J Abstract Drawing on long-term ethnographic fieldwork on older caregivers and their shifting roles since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy in northwest Tanzania, this article explores grandmothers' roles in caring for grandchildren who are HIV positive and on treatment. While AIDS treatment programmes usually focus on cultivating expert patients who can perform self-care, this study focuses on older caregivers and how they become experts in caring for their grandchildren living with HIV. How is expert care enacted and what supports or limits its quality? Based on observations and in-dept...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - September 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

'They'll inject you and you'll die': from medication non-compliance to acceptance in Guinea's Ebola treatment units.
This article, in addition to exploring patients' practices and related perceptions of treatment with evolving meanings in this outbreak crisis situation, also presents practical recommendations for future Ebola interventions as well as theoretical knowledge about the circulation and transformation of socially constructed representations of medications. PMID: 31385715 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - August 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

The embodiment of a floating signifier.
Authors: Littlewood R, Reynolds E Abstract As described in ethnographies, the 'floating signifiers' of social anthropology appear akin to similar categories in contemporary Western societies such as energy. Both may be embodied in actual experience. The practice of ritual orgasm, Pra-Na, and its relation to the group's cosmology, are intrinsic to a religio-therapeutic community in San Francisco whose ideas derive from reified Western notions of 'vital energy' along with popular Chinese medicine, and in which the second author conducted fieldwork involving participant observation between 2008 and 2009. The article e...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - August 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Situating biologies of traditional Chinese medicine in Central Europe.
Authors: Stöckelová T, Trnka S Abstract Since the concept of 'local biologies' was proposed in the 1990s, it has been used to examine biosocial processes that transform human bodies in similar and different ways around the globe. This paper explores understandings of biosocial differentiation and convergence in the case of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in the Czech Republic. Specifically, it examines how Czech TCM practitioners view TCM as universally applicable while fine-tuning it to situated biosocial conditions, experimenting with the compatibilities of various human and plant bodies as part of...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - August 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Not-knowing and the proliferation of assumptions: local explanations of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Suriname.
Authors: Ramdas S, van der Geest S Abstract Why do patients and others confronted with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) - a parasitic skin disease - in the hinterland of Suriname, South America, provide a dazzling variety of aetiological explanations for one single illness? And how do these explanations reflect local knowledge of and interest in the origin of illness? In this article, we explore these questions using the concept of 'not-knowing', as introduced by Murray Last in 1981. One of Last's conclusions is that 'don't knows' or 'don't cares' reflect people's disinterest in medicine. The aim of this article, howev...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - August 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Capturing complexity in the evaluation of a major area-based initiative in community empowerment: what can a multi-site, multi team, ethnographic approach offer?
Authors: Orton L, Ponsford R, Egan M, Halliday E, Whitehead M, Popay J Abstract In recent years, there has been growing emphasis on the need to develop ways of capturing 'complexity' in the evaluation of health initiatives in order to produce better evidence about 'how' and under what conditions such interventions work. Used alone, conventional methods of evaluation that attempt to reduce intervention processes and outcomes to a small number of discrete and finite variables, are typically not well suited to this task. Among the research community there have been increasing calls to take more seriously qualitative m...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

The contribution of ethnography to the evaluation of quality improvement in hospital settings: reflections on observing co-design in intensive care units and lung cancer pathways in the UK.
Authors: Vougioukalou S, Boaz A, Gager M, Locock L Abstract Ethnography is increasingly being used in the evaluation of quality improvement and change initiatives in healthcare settings, particularly in the form of 'focused' and 'rapid' ethnographies. This new ethnographic genre is tailored to suit narrower enquiries within clinical pathways. However, the application of ethnography to the evaluation of quality improvement is not straightforward or free from reductionist bias, particularly in hospital settings where interventions take place during a limited period of time and instigate change in busy and sensitive s...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Ethnography and evaluation: temporalities of complex systems and methodological complexity.
Authors: Reynolds J, Lewis S Abstract In public health there is increased focus on evaluating 'complex' interventions for health improvement, examining how their multiple components interact dynamically with the contextual system in which they are delivered. Amid this complexity framing are calls for methodologies that can facilitate contextual understanding as part of the evaluation process, including ethnography. However, while ethnography's attention to 'context' has been recognised as valuable for evaluation, few questions have been raised about the possible tensions of aligning what are quite different expecta...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Polycystic ovary syndrome, medical semantics, and the political ecology of health in India.
Authors: Pathak G Abstract Within public health, investigations into the rise of metabolic syndrome disorders, such as obesity and type II diabetes, following on the heels of globalisation have tended to focus on the twin axes of diet and physical exercise. However, such a limited focus obscures wider transformations in bodily and health-related practices that emerge in response to globalisation. This paper is an exploration of public discourses about PCOS-a hormonal disorder that affects menstruation, is associated with obesity, heart disease, and type II diabetes, and has been on the rise in India since the liber...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Experiences of integrated care: reflections on tensions of size, scale and perspective between ethnography and evaluation.
Authors: Hughes G Abstract An in-depth case study of integrated health and social care provides the empirical basis for this exploration of tensions between ethnography and evaluation. The case study, developed from a two year period of fieldwork, is based on ethnographic data of individuals' experiences of living with multiple long-term conditions, their experiences of integrated care, and integrated care commissioning practices. Narrative and phenomenological analysis show how temporal aspects of ethnographic fieldwork contribute to producing knowledge of patients' experiences. However, tensions emerge when attem...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - February 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Pluralism and practicality: village health workers' responses to contested meanings of mental illness in Southern Malawi.
Conclusions add to the call for such task-shifting approaches to work with communities to discern authentic and practical responses to mental distress that mirror the 'pluralism and pragmatism' found in the communities they serve. PMID: 30714836 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - February 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Ideals, negotiations and gender roles in gay and lesbian co-parenting arrangements.
Authors: Herbrand C Abstract This paper engages with the complex gender and parental dynamics experienced in the context of co-parenting arrangements. These arrangements, based on mutual agreement, involve people who commit to raising a child together, possibly with their respective partners. These family forms are usually pursued to avoid what is perceived as the uncertainty surrounding alternative assisted reproductive options such as donor insemination or surrogacy, and to allow the child to have two biological and sexually differentiated parental figures. This paper explores some of the opportunities and challe...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Conceptions of transgender parenthood in fertility care and family planning in Sweden: from reproductive rights to concrete practices.
Authors: Payne JG, Erbenius T Abstract It is an oft-repeated trope that the recent medical advances in the field of assisted reproduction have radically transformed the ways in which we can achieve, practice and imagine parenthood. This development has enabled new forms of non-heterosexual family constellations, including same-sex nuclear families and solo-parents by choice, and as a result an increasing number of groups are mobilising politically for access to fertility treatments. Swedish transgender patients are one of these groups; after many years of political mobilisation, they are no longer required by law t...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Commentary.
Authors: Inhorn MC PMID: 30686028 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

The role of normative ideologies of motherhood in intended mothers' experiences of egg donation in Canada.
Authors: Hammond K Abstract This paper explores 18 infertile Canadian intended mothers' experiences using donor eggs to conceive. Their narratives reflect a persistent normative ideology of reproduction and motherhood in Canada, where reproduction is natural, and expected, mother and child are genetically related, and two (genetic) parent families are what is normal. These ideologies permeate intended mothers' experiences of infertility, and their relationship with their egg donor. Much of the intended mothers' grief over their infertility was attributable to the gap between their experience and their perceived sen...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Conceiving contemporary parenthood: imagining, achieving and accounting for parenthood in new family forms.
Authors: Gürtin ZB, Faircloth C PMID: 30686030 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Intercultural health in Ecuador: an asymmetrical and incomplete project.
Authors: Herrera D, Hutchins F, Gaus D, Troya C Abstract Intimate connections between culture and health are complicated by various understandings of the human body, divergent beliefs about reality and place-bound theories about healing. Health care systems in various countries are modified with a goal of creating 'hybrid' structures that make room for traditional practices within a dominant Western model. But genuine intercultural health care is elusive. In Ecuador, a country with great cultural and geographic diversity, the culture-health spectrum is broad and bumpy. This is especially evident in health care poli...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - December 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Surrogate non-motherhood: Israeli and US surrogates speak about kinship and parenthood.
Authors: Teman E, Berend Z Abstract Drawing on a comparison of two ethnographic research projects on surrogacy in the United States and Israel, this paper explores surrogates' views about motherhood and parenthood, relationships and relatedness. The paper challenges three myths of surrogacy: that surrogates bond with the babies they carry for intended parents, that it is immoral not to acknowledge the surrogates' maternity, and that surrogacy upsets the moral order of society by dehumanizing and commodifying reproduction. Contrasting the similarities and differences in the voices of surrogates from these studies, t...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - July 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Generating toxic landscapes: impact on well-being of cotton farmers in Telangana, India.
Authors: Kannuri NK, Jadhav S Abstract Existing literature demonstrates agro-chemicals result in physical toxicity and damages human health, flora and fauna. However, little is known about how such 'toxicity' relates to mental well-being and social suffering. This paper aims to demonstrate how local, national and international vectors are interlinked to shape social distress among cotton farmers in India. Ethnographic interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in a cotton-growing village of the Warangal district, Telangana state, India. The results advance the concept of counter therapeutic spaces and hy...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - July 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Psychiatric hegemony: a Marxist theory of mental illness, by Bruce M. Z. Cohen.
Authors: Stragalinos P PMID: 29954189 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Anthropology and Medicine)
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - July 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research

Drinking water and chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka.
Authors: de Silva MWA Abstract This paper examines how people in Anuradhapura District in Sri Lanka affected by endemic chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDu) explain the factors causing the illness and their cultural meanings. The research found that the issue of contaminated water raised by the local community and the cultural meaning of water have influenced the government policy, health programmes, research agendas and the work of the media. Media reports on sociocultural, biomedical and epidemiological research into the aetiology of kidney disease have strengthened the perspective of the villagers ...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - July 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research