Information for Authors
(Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - April 1, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - April 1, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Perception and practice of sublingual immunotherapy among practicing allergists in the United States: a follow-up survey.
The use of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-established treatment modality for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis since it was initially described by Noon and Freeman in 1911.1 This is the only disease-modifying treatment available. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been used in Europe for decades, but is gaining popularity in the United States, especially with the recent FDA-approval of several SLIT products. Current products include ORALAIR ® (Stallergenes; Antony, France) which contains 5 northern grass pollens (Kentucky blue grass, orchard, perennial rye, sweet vernal, and Timothy), GRASTEK® (Merck; Whit...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - April 1, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Anita Sivam, Mike Tankersley, ACAAI Immunotherapy and Diagnostics Committee Source Type: research

What do allergists in practice need to know about non –IgE-mediated food allergies
Unlike immunoglobulin (Ig) E –mediated food allergy (FA), in which 1 pathophysiological mechanism explains 1 disease process, non-IgE FA encapsulates a number of disease states caused by different mechanisms1,2 but unified in their ability to cause gastrointestinal inflammation. The commonest non–IgE-mediated disorders enco untered and managed by allergists include food protein–induced allergic proctocolitis (FPIAP), eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), food protein–induced enteropathy (FPE), and food protein–induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 29, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Sam Mehr, Terri Brown-Whitehorn Tags: MOC-CME Review Source Type: research

"What do allergists in practice need to know about non-IgE-mediated food allergies".
"What do allergists in practice need to know about non-IgE-mediated food allergies". Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2019 Mar 29;: Authors: Mehr S, Brown-Whitehorn T PMID: 30935977 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 29, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Mehr S, Brown-Whitehorn T Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

"What do allergists in practice need to know about non-IgE-mediated food allergies"
Unlike IgE mediated food allergy (FA), where one pathophysiological mechanism explains one disease process, non-IgE FA encapsulates a number of disease states caused by different mechanisms (reviewed in1,2) but unified in their ability to cause gastrointestinal inflammation. The commonest non-IgE mediated disorders encountered and managed by allergists include food protein induced allergic proctocolitis (FPIAP), eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), food protein induced enteropathy (FPE), and food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 29, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: S. Mehr, Terri Brown-Whitehorn Tags: MOC-CME Review Source Type: research

Food allergy, eosinophilic esophagitis, and the enigma of IgG4
The recognition that immunoglobulin E (IgE), formerly known as reagin, is central to the pathogenesis of allergic disease dates back nearly a century to the seminal work of Prausnitz and Kustner. By contrast, IgG4 represents an antibody subclass that is often increased in the setting of allergic disease but whose role in disease pathogenesis is less clear.1 Reports in the 1980s suggested that allergen-specific IgG4 could play a role as an anaphylactic antibody, but subsequent research cast significant doubt on this possibility. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Emily C. McGowan, Thomas A.E. Platts-Mills, Jeffrey M. Wilson Tags: Perspective Source Type: research

Effect of topical pramoxine hydrochloride on discomfort, wheal and flare associated with epicutaneous allergy test
Prick-puncture test is the primary diagnostic modality for immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated hypersensitivity reactions.1 Allergen extracts are applied to the skin with a prick-puncture device. Wheal and flare diameters are measured 15 minutes after application and compared with positive (histamine) and negative (saline) controls.2 Although this technique is very sensitive for the diagnosis of IgE-mediated hypersensitivities, it is occasionally deferred because of concerns for discomfort, particularly among children. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Erika T. Watts-Oquendo, Giannina Coppola-Fasick, Erving Arroyo-Flores, Marievelisse Soto-Salgado, Sylvette Nazario Tags: Letter Source Type: research

Effect of topical pramoxine hydrochloride on discomfort, wheal and flare associated to epicutaneous allergy test.
PMID: 30928414 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Watts E, Fasick GC, Arroyo-Flores E, Soto-Salgado M, Nazario S Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

The Emerging Biologic Therapies on Food Allergy.
PMID: 30928415 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Albuhairi S, Rachid R Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Prediction of acute asthma exacerbation severity and interrater reliability of manual pulsus paradoxus measurement.
PMID: 30928416 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Arnold DH, Vukovic AA, Arnold CG, Penrod C, Pologe JA Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Food Allergy, Eosinophilic Esophagitis and the Enigma of IgG4.
PMID: 30928417 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: McGowan EC, Platts-Mills TAE, Wilson JM Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Food Allergy, Eosinophilic Esophagitis and the Enigma of IgG4
The recognition that IgE, formerly known as reagin, is central to the pathogenesis of allergic disease dates back nearly a century to the seminal work of Prausnitz and Kustner. By contrast, IgG4 represents an antibody subclass that is often increased in the setting of allergic disease but whose role in disease pathogenesis is less clear1. Reports in the 1980s suggested that allergen-specific IgG4 could play a role as an anaphylactic antibody, but subsequent research cast significant doubt on this possibility. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Emily C. McGowan, Thomas A.E. Platts-Mills, Jeffrey M. Wilson Source Type: research

Prediction of acute asthma exacerbation severity and interrater reliability of manual pulsus paradoxus measurement
Pulsus paradoxus (PP) represents an exaggeration of the normal fluctuation of left ventricular stroke volume and systolic blood pressure during the respiratory cycle.1 This physiologic phenomenon was first described by Lower in 1669 and the term pulsus paradoxus first applied by Kussmaul in 1873.2 PP measurement is recommended to identify or assess the severity of acute asthma exacerbations, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade and other potentially life-threatening disorders.3 (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Donald H. Arnold, Adam A. Vukovic, Cosby G. Arnold, Cody Penrod, Jonas A. Pologe Tags: Letters Source Type: research

The Emerging Biologic Therapies on Food Allergy
Food allergy affects ∼8% of children and up to 5% of adults. Standard-of-care consists of food avoidance and keeping rescue epinephrine and antihistamines available.1 While oral (OIT) and/or epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) products may receive FDA within the next 1-2 years, these require long-term compliance and are not known to lead a cure and may cause recurrent allergic reactions. A number of biologics has been used to treat atopic diseases and asthma but only few have been evaluated to date in food allergy (Table1). (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Sultan Albuhairi, Rima Rachid Source Type: research

Effect of topical pramoxine hydrochloride on discomfort, wheal and flare associated to epicutaneous allergy test
Prick-puncture test is the primary diagnostic modality for Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated hypersensitivity reactions1. Allergen extracts are applied to the skin with a prick-puncture device. Wheal and flare diameters are measured fifteen minutes after application and compared with positive (histamine) and negative (saline) controls2. Although this technique is very sensitive for the diagnosis of IgE mediated hypersensitivities, it is occasionally deferred because of concerns for discomfort, particularly among children. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 27, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Erika Watts, Giannina Coppola Fasick, Erving Arroyo-Flores, Marievelisse Soto-Salgado, Sylvette Nazario Tags: Letters Source Type: research

Gadolinium-induced anaphylaxis with positive skin test results
Gadolinium is a heavy metal element with paramagnetic properties used as contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. There are 9 types of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), which can be classified as ionic or nonionic and linear or macrocyclic.1 Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to GBCAs are uncommon (0.004%-0.7%), but anaphylaxis (0.001%-0.01%2) and fatalities have occurred. These less frequent acute reactions were once considered nonimmunologic. However, there are few case reports that implicate an IgE-dependent allergic mechanism. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 26, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Guillermo Rodriguez-Nava, Alex M. Kesler, Ismael Carrillo-Martin, Alexei Gonzalez-Estrada Tags: Letter Source Type: research

Gadolinium induced anaphylaxis with positive skin tests.
PMID: 30926309 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 26, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Rodriguez-Nava G, Kesler AM, Carrilo-Martin I, Gonzalez-Estrada A Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Gadolinium induced anaphylaxis with positive skin tests
Gadolinium is a heavy metal element with paramagnetic properties used as contrast in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies. There are nine types of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), that may be classified as ionic or nonionic and linear or macrocyclic.1 Hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to GBCAs are uncommon (0.004 to 0.7%), but anaphylaxis (0.001 to 0.01%2) and fatalities have occurred. These less frequent acute reactions were once considered non-immunological. However, there are few case reports implicating an IgE-dependent allergic mechanism. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 26, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Guillermo Rodriguez-Nava, Alex M. Kesler, Ismael Carrilo-Martin, Alexei Gonzalez-Estrada Tags: Letters Source Type: research

Feeding difficulties in children with non –IgE-mediated food allergic gastrointestinal disorders
To review the signs and symptoms of feeding difficulties in children with non –IgE-mediated food allergic gastrointestinal disorders and provide practical advice, with the goal of guiding the practitioner to timely referral for further evaluation and therapy. Various management approaches are also discussed. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Mirna Chehade, Rosan Meyer, Alexia Beauregard Tags: Review Source Type: research

Galactose α-1,3-galactose phenotypes
To review published studies on galactose α-1,3-galactose (α-gal), a carbohydrate epitope found on proteins and lipids in nonprimate mammals and present in foods (particularly organ or fat-rich red meat) and medications, where it causes delayed-onset and immediate-onset anaphylaxis. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michael Levin, Danijela Apostolovic, Tilo Biedermann, Scott P. Commins, Onyinye I. Iweala, Thomas A.E. Platts-Mills, Eleonora Savi, Marianne van Hage, Jeffrey M. Wilson Tags: Review Source Type: research

The Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis in Children with Food Allergy.
PMID: 30922954 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Samady W, Warren C, Kohli S, Jain R, Bilaver L, Mancini AJ, Gupta R Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Feeding Difficulties in Children with non-IgE mediated Food Allergic Gastrointestinal Disorders.
PMID: 30922955 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Chehade M, Meyer R, Beauregard A Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Alpha-gal phenotypes- lessons from various patient populations.
Abstract Galactose alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) is a carbohydrate epitope found on proteins and lipids in non-primate mammals and present in foods (particularly organ or fat-rich red meat) and medications, where it causes delayed onset and immediate onset anaphylaxis respectively. Several species of ticks contain alpha-gal epitopes and possibly salivary adjuvants that promote high titre sensitisation and clinical reactivity. Risk factors for alpha-gal syndrome include exposure to ticks of particular species. Age and gender differences seen in various cohorts possibly reflect the prevalence of these exposures th...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Levin M, Apostolovic D, Biedermann T, Commins SP, Iweala OI, Platts-Mills TAE, Savi E, van Hage M, Wilson JM Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

The Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis in Children with Food Allergy
Food allergy (FA) impacts approximately 8% of children in the U.S.1 The strongest and most established risk factor for the development of FA is atopic dermatitis (AD), a pruritic inflammatory skin disease that is most common in children.2 The HealthNuts cohort study found that one in five Australian infants with AD were allergic to peanut, egg white, or sesame compared to 1 in 25 infants without AD,2 indicating a strong link between AD and FA. A leading theory for how AD predisposes to the development of FA is referred to as the Dual Allergen Exposure Hypothesis, which proposes that allergic sensitization to food can occur...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Waheeda Samady, Christopher Warren, Simran Kohli, Rohan Jain, Lucy Bilaver, Anthony J. Mancini, Ruchi Gupta Tags: Letters Source Type: research

Feeding Difficulties in Children with non-IgE mediated Food Allergic Gastrointestinal Disorders
Food allergies can involve the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in various ways. Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergies typically cause nausea and vomiting, which can occur almost immediately following ingestion of the culprit food, often while the food is still being consumed, and/or diarrhea, which may occur promptly or may be delayed by several hours.1 In contrast, non-IgE-mediated food allergic reactions are more delayed. They occur with repetitive exposure to the culprit food(s) and typically result in chronic inflammation affecting various parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with associated symptoms (Table 1)...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Mirna Chehade, Rosan Meyer, Alexia Beauregard Tags: Review Source Type: research

Alpha-gal phenotypes- lessons from various patient populations
Galactose alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) is a carbohydrate epitope found on proteins and lipids in non-primate mammals and present in foods (particularly organ or fat-rich red meat) and medications, where it causes delayed onset and immediate onset anaphylaxis respectively. Several species of ticks contain alpha-gal epitopes and possibly salivary adjuvants that promote high titre sensitisation and clinical reactivity. Risk factors for alpha-gal syndrome include exposure to ticks of particular species. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 25, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michael Levin., Danijela Apostolovic, Tilo Biedermann, Scott P. Commins, Onyinye I. Iweala, Thomas A.E. Platts-Mills, Eleonora Savi, Marianne van Hage, Jeffrey M. Wilson Tags: Review Source Type: research

AllergyWatch
The articles reviewed in this month's edition of From the Pages of Allergy Watch were selected to coincide with the food allergy theme. The first article investigates potential inflammatory markers in children who outgrow their food allergy. The article reviewed by Dr Khan investigates the usefulness of behavioral therapy intervention to help allay anxiety for parents of children with food allergy. The article reviewed by Dr Oppenheimer explores the immunologic mechanism associated with the development of tolerance in young children with cow's milk allergy. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Stanley M. Fineman, David A. Khan, John J. Oppenheimer Tags: From the Pages of allergy Source Type: research

Efficacy and safety of olopatadine-mometasone combination nasal spray for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis
GSP301 nasal spray is a fixed-dose combination of olopatadine hydrochloride (antihistamine) and mometasone furoate (corticosteroid). (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Gary N. Gross, Gary Berman, Niran J. Amar, Cynthia F. Caracta, Sudeesh K. Tantry Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Life-long learning and the American Board of Allergy and Immunology
Commitment to life-long learning is one of the hallmarks of a medical career. For diplomates of the American Board of Allergy and Immunology (ABAI), involvement in practice improvement activities is required for continued participation in Maintenance of Certification (MOC) (Fig 1). These activities, which are classified as Part IV MOC, are intended “to help the physician investigate and evaluate their patient care practices, appraise and assimilate scientific evidence and improve their practice of medicine.”1 In the past, these practice assessment activities have focused on improvement in clinical practice&mdas...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Mitchell H. Grayson, John Oppenheimer, Mariana Castells, Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn Tags: Perspective Source Type: research

From the pages of AllergyWatch June 2019.
PMID: 30910437 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Fineman SM, Khan DA, Oppenheimer JJ Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Life-long learning and the ABAI: practice improvement comes of age.
PMID: 30910438 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Grayson MH, Oppenheimer J, Castells M, Nowak-Wegrzyn A Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

In Memoriam: Douglas C. Heiner, MD, PhD (1925-2018).
PMID: 30910439 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Bahna SL Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Efficacy and safety of olopatadine/mometasone combination nasal spray for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.
PMID: 30910440 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Gross GN, Berman G, Amar NJ, Caracta CF, Tantry SK Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Caregiver perceptions of when to offer an oral food challenge for children with food allergy.
PMID: 30910441 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Kraft MT, Scherzer R, Erwin EA, Mikhail I Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Caregiver perceptions of when to offer an oral food challenge for children with food allergy
Food allergy (FA) is a rising public health concern, affecting up to 5% of the pediatric population.1 Oral food challenges (OFCs) are the gold standard for diagnosing FA.2 Although the decision to undergo an OFC is multifactorial, current guidelines suggest considering an OFC when the likelihood of passing the challenge is approximately 50%.3 Prior studies have shown that performing an OFC is associated with better quality of life (QOL) among caregivers of individuals with FA and reduced parental burden of FA, regardless of challenge outcome. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Monica T. Kraft, Rebecca Scherzer, Elizabeth A. Erwin, Irene Mikhail Tags: Letters Source Type: research

In Memoriam: Douglas C. Heiner, MD, PhD (1925-2018)
Dr. Douglas Cragun Heiner, 93, passed away peacefully of natural causes at home in Alpine, Utah on September 19, 2018. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine with Honors in 1950. After a one-year internship, he began active duty at the U.S. Army Hospital in Aberdeen, Maryland then ordered to the Expeditionary U.S. Army Headquarters in Seoul, Korea, where he served for 15 months as a preventive medicine officer. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Sami L. Bahna Tags: Letters Source Type: research

Life-long learning and the ABAI: practice improvement comes of age
ANW receives grants from DBV Technologies, Astellas Pharma, Nutricia, and Nestle; receives royalties from UpToDate; serves on advisory boards for the Gerber Institute, Merck, ALK-Abello, Regeneron; and is the deputy editor for the Annals of Allergy Asthma and Immunology. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Mitchell H. Grayson, John Oppenheimer, Mariana Castells, Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn Tags: Perspective Source Type: research

From the pages of AllergyWatch June 2019
This study examined innate immune profiles associated with the development of egg allergy and natural tolerance in childhood, including the effects of serum vitamin D. The study used peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples longitudinally collected from 54 infants enrolled in the population-based HealthNuts study: 36 who had egg allergy at age 1 year and 18 with no food allergy. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Stanley M. Fineman, David A. Khan, John J. Oppenheimer Source Type: research

Efficacy and safety of olopatadine/mometasone combination nasal spray for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis
Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a nasal inflammatory response caused by an exaggerated immunological reaction to an allergen that is generally characterized by one or more symptoms of nasal congestion, sneezing, rhinorrhea, and nasal itching.1 AR is one of the most common chronic diseases in both pediatric and adult patients, affecting 5.6 million children2 and 19.9 million adults in the US.3 While AR is typically categorized as perennial (PAR; occurring year-round) or seasonal (SAR; occurring in a specific pollen season), the distinction between these can be difficult to determine as some patients can have both SAR and PAR, and...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 22, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Gary N. Gross, Gary Berman, Niran J. Amar, Cynthia F. Caracta, Sudeesh K. Tantry Source Type: research

Understanding patient experiences with allergy immunotherapy
For patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR) who are considering allergy immunotherapy (AIT), uncertainty over treatment choice because of whether the treatment fits with one's values and lifestyle may be common and problematic. Furthermore, a review of AIT adherence found that premature discontinuation occurred at rates ranging from 6% to 84% for subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and 21% to 93% for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT).1 Although shared decision making (SDM) between physicians and patients has been shown to impact adherence in other therapeutic areas,2,3 little insight exists into the role it may or may ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 20, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Brian Stone, Ellyn Charap, Heather L. Black Tags: Letter Source Type: research

Understanding Patient Experiences with Allergen Immunotherapy: "Living with Allergies Study".
Understanding Patient Experiences with Allergen Immunotherapy: "Living with Allergies Study". Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2019 Mar 20;: Authors: Stone B, Charap E, Black HL PMID: 30904578 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 20, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Stone B, Charap E, Black HL Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Sexual Intercourse as a Trigger of Inducible Urticaria.
PMID: 30904579 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 20, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Geller M Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Association Between Fungal Spore Exposure in Inner-City Schools and Asthma Morbidity.
PMID: 30904580 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 20, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Baxi SN, Sheehan WJ, Sordillo JE, Muilenberg ML, Rogers CA, Gaffin JM, Permaul P, Lai PS, Louisias M, Petty CR, Fu C, Gold DR, Phipatanakul W Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

Understanding Patient Experiences with Allergen Immunotherapy: “Living with Allergies Study”
For patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR) who are considering allergen immunotherapy (AIT), uncertainty over treatment choice due to whether the treatment fits with one ’s values and lifestyle may be common and problematic. Furthermore, a review of AIT adherence found that premature discontinuation occurred at rates ranging from 6% to 84% for subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and 21% to 93% for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT).1 Although shared decision making (SD M) between physicians and patients has been shown to impact adherence in other therapeutic areas,2, 3 there is little insight into the role it may...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 20, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Brian Stone, Ellyn Charap, Heather L. Black Tags: Letters Source Type: research

Association Between Fungal Spore Exposure in Inner-City Schools and Asthma Morbidity
Asthma is the most common chronic disease among children. Poorly controlled asthma can cause disturbed sleep, limited activity and missed school days. The environment is one of many factors that influence asthma morbidity1, 2. Several studies and meta-analyses have recognized that home fungus exposure may be associated with development or worsening of asthma3-9. Children spend a large portion of their day in school; however, few studies have provided a comprehensive assessment of fungus in the school classroom and the possible effects on students with asthma10-13. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 20, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Sachin N. Baxi, William J. Sheehan, Joanne E. Sordillo, Michael L. Muilenberg, Christine A. Rogers, Jonathan M. Gaffin, Perdita Permaul, Peggy S. Lai, Margee Louisias, Carter R. Petty, Chunxia Fu, Diane R. Gold, Wanda Phipatanakul Source Type: research

Sexual Intercourse as a Trigger of Inducible Urticaria
Aerobic exercises can precipitate inducible urticarias. Cholinergic urticaria and exercise-induced anaphylaxis are good examples of these triggers1-2. The same can happen in patients with delayed pressure urticaria when areas of the body are compressed during exercises3. To our knowledge, sexual intercourse has not been documented for triggering inducible urticarias. We are presenting two cases of inducible urticaria precipitated by sexual intercourse: exercise-induced anaphylaxis and delayed pressure urticaria. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 20, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Mario Geller Tags: Letters Source Type: research

Rituximab hypersensitivity and desensitization
Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody with wide use in cancer (lymphoma) and connective tissue diseases (rheumatoid arthritis and vasculitis).1 Hypersensitivity reactions to rituximab can range from type I immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated reaction (urticaria, shortness of breath, hypotension, or anaphylaxis) to cytokine-mediated reaction (fevers, chills, rigors) or a mix of both, thus limiting the use of rituximab as first-line therapy for many cases. Desensitization is a new therapeutic approach that can be performed with rituximab to offset these reactions. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 15, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Barbara C. Yang, Mariana C. Castells Tags: Challenging Clinical Cases Source Type: research

"Rituximab hypersensitivity and desensitization: A personalized approach to treat cancer and connective tissue diseases".
"Rituximab hypersensitivity and desensitization: A personalized approach to treat cancer and connective tissue diseases". Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2019 Mar 15;: Authors: Yang BC, Castells MC PMID: 30885801 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 15, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Yang BC, Castells MC Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

“Rituximab hypersensitivity and desensitization: A personalized approach to treat cancer and connective tissue diseases”
Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody with wide use in cancer (lymphoma) and connective tissue diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis)1. Hypersensitivity reactions to rituximab can range from type I IgE-mediated reaction (urticaria, shortness of breath, hypotension, or anaphylaxis), to cytokine-mediated reaction (fevers, chills, rigors), or a mix of both, thus limiting the use of rituximab as first line therapy for many cases. Desensitization is a new therapeutic approach which can be performed with rituximab to offset these reactions. (Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - March 15, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Barbara C. Yang, Mariana C. Castells Tags: Challenging Clinical Cases Source Type: research