The Use of Biologic Agents for the Treatment of Cutaneous Immune-Related Adverse Events from Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: A Review of Reported Cases
AbstractCutaneous immune-related adverse events encompass a spectrum of dermatological manifestations, including lichenoid reactions, psoriasiform eruptions, eczematous dermatitis, immunobullous disorders, granulomatous reactions, pruritus, vitiligo, and severe cutaneous adverse reactions such as Stevens –Johnson syndrome. The conventional approach to treating high-grade or refractory cutaneous immune-related adverse events has involved high-dose systemic corticosteroids. However, their use is limited owing to the potential disruption of antitumor responses and associated complications. To address this, corticosteroid-sp...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - May 20, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Management and Long-Term Outcomes of Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DReSS) in Children: A Scoping Review
In this study, we identify strengths and weaknesses in the currently available literature and highlight that future prospective studies with structured and long-term follow-up of children with DReSS are needed to better understand potential risk factors for mortality and development of sequelae after DReSS. (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - May 16, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Managing the Patient with Psoriasis and Metabolic Comorbidities
In conclusion, the choice of the best approach to manage patients with psoriasis with metabolic comorbidities should encompass both tailored pharmacological and individualized non-pharmacological interventions. (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - May 15, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Approach to the Atypical Wound
AbstractThe heterogeneity of atypical wounds can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges; however, as the prevalence of atypical wounds grows worldwide, prompt and accurate management is increasingly an essential skill for dermatologists. Addressing the underlying cause of an atypical wound is critical for successful outcomes. An integrated approach with a focus on pain management and patient engagement is recommended to facilitate enduring wound closure. Advances in treatment, in addition to further research and clinical training, are necessary to address the expanding burden of atypical wounds. (Source: American Jo...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - May 14, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Dupilumab Safety and Efficacy up to 1 Year in Children Aged 6 Months to 5 Years with Atopic Dermatitis: Results from a Phase 3 Open-Label Extension Study
ConclusionsConsistent with results seen in adults, adolescents, and older children (aged 6 –11 years), treatment with dupilumab for up to 1 year in children aged 6 months to 5 years with inadequately controlled moderate-to-severe AD demonstrated an acceptable long-term safety profile and sustained efficacy. These results support the long-term continuous use of dupilumab in this patient population.Trial RegistrationClinicalTrials.gov Identifiers: NCT02612454 and NCT03346434 (part B). (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - May 14, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Efficacy, Safety, and Long-Term Disease Control of Ruxolitinib Cream Among Adolescents with Atopic Dermatitis: Pooled Results from Two Randomized Phase 3 Studies
ConclusionsMeaningful anti-inflammatory and antipruritic effects were demonstrated with 1.5% ruxolitinib cream in the subset of adolescent patients with AD, comparable with those observed in the overall study population; long-term, as-needed use  maintained disease control and was well tolerated.Clinical Trial RegistrationClinicalTrials.gov identifiers NCT03745638 (registered 19 November 2018) and NCT03745651 (registered 19 November 2018). (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - May 2, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting: San Diego, CA, USA, 8 –12 March 2024
(Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - April 26, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Integrating Epidemiology, Immunology, and Therapeutic Updates
AbstractMerkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare skin cancer characterized by neuroendocrine differentiation. Its carcinogenesis is based either on the integration of the Merkel cell polyomavirus or on ultraviolet (UV) mutagenesis, both of which lead to high immunogenicity either through the expression of viral proteins or neoantigens. Despite this immunogenicity resulting from viral or UV-associated carcinogenesis, it exhibits highly aggressive behavior. However, owing to the rarity of MCC and the lack of epidemiologic registries with detailed clinical data, there is some uncertainty regarding the spontaneous course of the d...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - April 22, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Ultrasound Surveillance in Melanoma Management: Bridging Diagnostic Promise with Real-World Adherence: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
ConclusionUltrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool for locoregional melanoma metastasis. However, the real applicability to surveillance programmes is limited by low adherence rates, especially in the US. Further studies should seek to address this adherence gap. (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - April 18, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Secondary Bacterial Infections in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis or Other Common Dermatoses
AbstractSecondary bacterial infections of common dermatoses such as atopic dermatitis, ectoparasitosis, and varicella zoster virus infections are frequent, withStaphylococcus aureus andStreptococcus pyogenes being the bacteria most involved. There are also Gram-negative infections secondary to common dermatoses such as foot dyshidrotic eczema and tinea pedis. Factors favoring secondary bacterial infections in atopic dermatitis, ectoparasitosis, and varicella zoster virus infections mainly include an epidermal barrier alteration as well as itch. Mite-bacteria interaction is also involved in scabies and some environmental fa...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - April 5, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Early and Sustained Improvements in Symptoms and Quality of Life with Upadacitinib in Adults and Adolescents with Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis: 52-Week Results from Two Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials (Measure Up 1 and Measure  Up 2)
ConclusionsAdults and adolescents with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis treated with once-daily upadacitinib 15 or 30 mg experienced early improvements in itch, pain, other skin symptoms, sleep, quality of life, and mental health that were sustained through week  52.Clinical Trial RegistrationClinicalTrials.gov identifiers NCT03569293 (13 August 2018) and NCT03607422 (27 July 2018). (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - March 25, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Tree-Based Machine Learning to Identify Predictors of Psoriasis Incidence at the Neighborhood Level: A Populational Study from Quebec, Canada
ConclusionThis is the first study to highlight highly variable psoriasis incidence rates on a jurisdictional level and suggests that living environment, notably climate, vegetation, urbanization and neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics may have an association with psoriasis incidence. (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - March 18, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Expert Panel Review of Skin and Hair Dermatophytoses in an Era of Antifungal Resistance
AbstractDermatophytoses are fungal infections of the skin, hair, and nails that affect approximately 25% of the global population. Occlusive clothing, living in a hot humid environment, poor hygiene, proximity to animals, and crowded living conditions are important risk factors. Dermatophyte infections are named for the anatomic area they infect, and include tinea corporis, cruris, capitis, barbae, faciei, pedis, and manuum. Tinea incognito describes steroid-modified tinea. In some patients, especially those who are immunosuppressed or who have a history of corticosteroid use, dermatophyte infections may spread to involve ...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - March 18, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Management of Acne in Pregnancy
AbstractAcne is one of the most common dermatological conditions to affect women of childbearing age, so it is important to consider the safety of long-term acne treatments on women who could become pregnant. In this review article, we clarify what management options are available to treat acne during pregnancy. Topical treatments, typically first-line for acne, such as azelaic acid, clindamycin, erythromycin, metronidazole, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, dapsone, and retinoids, were reviewed. Systemic treatments, such as zinc supplements, cephalexin, cefadroxil, amoxicillin, azithromycin, erythromycin, and corticostero...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - March 7, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Small-Molecule Inhibitors and Biologics for Palmoplantar Psoriasis and Palmoplantar Pustulosis: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis
ConclusionAmong all available biologics and small-molecule inhibitors, secukinumab 300 mg and guselkumab 100 mg had the most favorable efficacy in treating PP and PPP, respectively. (Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology)
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - March 4, 2024 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research