Becoming outstanding educators: What do they say contributed to success?
This study revealed common themes describing trajectories of success among medical educators. These themes aligned with the SCCT, and typically replayed and spiraled over the course of the educators’ careers. These findings resonate with other studies, lending credence to an approach to career development that can be shared with junior facul ty who are exploring careers in medical education. (Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - January 15, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

When logics of learning conflict: an analysis of two workplace-based continuing education programs
In conclusion, we offer the metaphor of CE educator as choreographer, connecting concepts and practices within these logics in productive ways while continually navigating the various learning imperatives acting on professionals at any given time. (Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - January 2, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Hobson ’s choice: patient-centred or standardized care
(Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - January 2, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

The viability of interprofessional entrustable professional activities
AbstractInterprofessional education (IPE) and entrustable professional activities (EPAs) represent two topics in health professions education that have attracted significant attention in recent years. IPE (when different health professionals learn with, from and about each other with the aim of optimal care) has an inherent focus on the collective. EPAs (units of professional practice that can be fully entrusted to a trainee, once he or she has demonstrated the necessary competence to execute this activity unsupervised) have a focus on the individual. Attempts to relate the two may cause friction and the question is: can t...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - December 23, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Necessary but not sufficient: identifying conditions for effective feedback during internal medicine residents ’ clinical education
AbstractCompetency-based medical education and programmatic assessment intend to increase the opportunities for meaningful feedback, yet these conversations remain elusive. By comparing resident and faculty perceptions of feedback opportunities within one internal medicine residency training program, we sought to understand whether and how principles underlying meaningful feedback could be supported or constrained across a variety of feedback opportunities. Using case-study qualitative methodology, interviews and focus groups were conducted to explore 19 internal medicine residents ’ and 7 faculty members’ perc...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - December 23, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

The development of competency frameworks in healthcare professions: a scoping review
AbstractCompetency frameworks serve various roles including outlining characteristics of a competent workforce, facilitating mobility, and analysing or assessing expertise. Given these roles and their relevance in the health professions, we sought to understand the methods and strategies used in the development of existing competency frameworks. We applied the Arksey and O ’Malley framework to undertake this scoping review. We searched six electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Scopus, and ERIC) and three grey literature sources (greylit.org, Trove and Google Scholar) using keywords related to compe...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - December 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Celebrating 50  years of problem-based learning: progress, pitfalls and possibilities
(Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - December 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

A review to identify key perspectives in PBL meta-analyses and reviews: trends, gaps and future research directions
AbstractIn the past 50  years, the original McMaster PBL model has been implemented, experimented, revised, and modified, and is still evolving. Yet, the development of PBL is not a series of success stories, but rather a journey of experiments, failures and lessons learned. In this paper, we analyzed the meta-analyses a nd systematic reviews on PBL from 1992 to present as they provide a focused lens on the PBL research in the past 5 decades. We identified three major waves in the PBL research development, analyzed their impact on PBL research and practice, and offered suggestions of research gaps and future dire...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Scoping reviews in health professions education: challenges, considerations and lessons learned about epistemology and methodology
AbstractScoping reviews are increasingly used in health professions education to synthesize research and scholarship, and to report on the depth and breadth of the literature on a given topic. In this Perspective, we argue that the philosophical stance scholars adopt during the execution of a scoping review, including the meaning they attribute to fundamental concepts such asknowledge andevidence, influences how they gather, analyze, and interpret information obtained from a heterogeneous body of literature. We highlight the principles informing scoping reviews and outline howepistemology—the aspect of philosophy tha...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Reflections on the loss of mentors
AbstractThere is a special category of mentor: the person who supports you as much as they support your career. They offer a unique relationship that is rich and powerful. Researchers have tried to better understand this relationship and  the other varieties of mentoring relationships. But there is a significant gap in that research: we don’t talk about the experience of the sudden loss of a mentor. Sometimes mentoring relationships end—especially if the mentoring was in support of specific goals, learning objectives, or when the relationship simply no longer fits the needs of the mentor or the mentee...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

How theory and design-based research can mature PBL practice and research
AbstractMany educational institutions in higher education switched to problem-based learning (PBL) in the last 5 decades. Despite its ’ successful implementation worldwide, many institutions still encounter problems in their daily teaching practices that limit deep learning in students. This raises the question: How else can we look at PBL practice and research? The main argument of this reflective paper is to better align PBL p ractice with the theories or principles of contextual, constructive, self-directed and collaborative learning. This paper explains what these principles or theories are. In addition, it discu...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 13, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Investigating the validity of web-enabled mechanistic case diagramming scores to assess students ’ integration of foundational and clinical sciences
AbstractAs medical schools have changed their curricula to address foundational and clinical sciences in a more integrated fashion, teaching methods such as concept mapping have been incorporated in small group learning settings. Methods that can assess students ’ ability to apply such integrated knowledge are not as developed, however. The purpose of this project was to assess the validity of scores on a focused version of concept maps called mechanistic case diagrams (MCDs), which are hypothesized to enhance existing tools for assessing integrated knowl edge that supports clinical reasoning. The data were from the ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 13, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

A systematic scoping review of ethical issues in mentoring in internal medicine, family medicine and academic medicine
AbstractMentoring ’s role in medical education is threatened by the potential abuse of mentoring relationships. Particularly affected are mentoring relationships between senior clinicians and junior doctors which lie at the heart of mentoring. To better understand and address these concerns, a systematic scoping re view into prevailing accounts of ethical issues and professional lapses in mentoring is undertaken. Arksey and O’Malley’s (Int J Soc Res Methodol 8(1):19–32, 2005.https://doi.org/10.1080/1364557032000119616) methodological framework for conducting scoping reviews was employed to explore t...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

From physiotherapy to the army: negotiating previously developed professional identities in mature medical students
This study examined the development of professional identity in mature medical students who had a variety of previous careers prior to entering medical school. A narrative inquiry was undertaken using interviews of mature medical students with backgrounds that included physiot herapy, clinical physiology, public health and nutrition, and the armed forces. A narrative analysis was conducted combining both thematic and structural perspectives using linguistics and positioning theory as interpretive tools. Three main themes emerged that portray the development processes that arise in this cohort as they develop their medical ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Factors affecting recruitment into General Practice: a double binary choice approach
AbstractRecruitment to General Practice (GP) is currently low in many countries. Here we focus on two binary choices for junior doctors: first, whether to apply to GP; second, whether to accept a GP training place if offered. Previous attitudinal studies have indicated factors claimed to affect recruitment. The current study goes further by quantifying the relative impact of different factors on the propensity of candidates to apply to GP and accept a training place. An online questionnaire was sent to candidates applying to United Kingdom (UK) specialty training in 2015. Descriptive statistics and a path analysis evaluate...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 6, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Supervision training in healthcare: a realist synthesis
AbstractSupervision matters: it serves educational, supportive and management functions. Despite a plethora of evidence on the effectiveness of supervision, scant evidence for the impact of supervision training exists. While three previous literature reviews have begun to examine the effectiveness of supervision training, they fail to explore the extent to which supervision training works, for whom, and why. We adopted a realist approach to answer the question: to what extent do supervision training interventions work (or not), for whom and in what circumstances, and why? We conducted a team-based realist synthesis of the ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Social ties between team members affect patient satisfaction: a data-driven approach to handling complex network analyses
In this study, we explored the association between social ties within emergency teams performing simulated caesarean sections (CS) and patient-actor satisfaction. Two hundred seventy-two participants were allocated to 33 teams performing two emergency CSs in a simulated setting. We collected data on social ties between team-members, measured as affective, personal and professional ties. Ties were rated on 5-point Likert scales. In addition, participants ’ clinical experience, demographic data and their knowledge about team members’ roles were surveyed. Perceived patient satisfaction was measured on a 5-point Li...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

The compatibility principle: on philosophies in the assessment of clinical competence
AbstractThe array of different philosophical positions underlying contemporary views on competence, assessment strategies and justification have led to advances in assessment science. Challenges may arise when these philosophical positions are not considered in assessment design. These can include (a) a logical incompatibility leading to varied or difficult interpretations of assessment results, (b) an “anything goes” approach, and (c) uncertainty regarding when and in what context various philosophical positions are appropriate. We propose a compatibility principle that recognizes that different philosophical ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - November 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Understanding the influence of teacher –learner relationships on learners’ assessment perception
AbstractLow-stakes assessments are theorised to stimulate and support self-regulated learning. They are feedback-, not decision-oriented, and should hold little consequences to a learner based on their performance. The use of low-stakes assessment as a learning opportunity requires an environment in which continuous improvement is encouraged. This may be hindered by learners ’ perceptions of assessment as high-stakes. Teachers play a key role in learners’ assessment perceptions. By investigating assessment perceptions through an interpersonal theory-based perspective of teacher–learner relationships, we a...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Gender awareness in medicine: adaptation and validation of the Nijmegen Gender Awareness in Medicine Scale to the Portuguese population (N-GAMS)
AbstractHealth care professionals ’ gender awareness has been presented as a mechanism to minimize gender biases in health. The present paper aimed to adapt and validate theNijmegen Gender Awareness in Medicine Scale (N-GAMS, Verdonk et al. in Sex Roles 58:222 –234, 2008.https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-007-9326-x) to the Portuguese population, also addressing some limitations of its original study, namely by: (1) testing the scale ’s three-fold underlying structure and (2) extending the study of its criteria-related validity, by analyzing sex-related differences in medical students’ gender awareness ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Problem-based projects in medical education: extending PBL practices and broadening learning perspectives
This article explores the utility of projects in problem-based learning —project-PBL—as a way to supplement traditional case-PBL. First, project-PBL may enhance student engagement and motivation by allowing them to direct their own learning. Second, project-PBL may help students develop metacognitive competencies by forcing them to collaborate and regulate learning in settings wi thout a facilitator. Finally, project-PBL may foster skills and competencies related to medical research. As illustrated through a brief example from Aalborg University, Denmark, students learn differently from project-PBL and case-PBL...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Conflict between clinician teachers and their students: the clinician perspective
This study shows how the clinician perspective to challenging student/clinician encounters impacts on the quality of education they are able to provide. We recommend medical schools consider these issues when designing their programs in order to develop and maintain clinician–teacher engagement and participation. (Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Institutional strategies related to test-taking behavior in low stakes assessment
AbstractLow stakes assessment without grading the performance of students in educational systems has received increasing attention in recent years. It is used in formative assessments to guide the learning process as well as in large-scales assessments to monitor educational programs. Yet, such assessments suffer from high variation in students ’ test-taking effort. We aimed to identify institutional strategies related to serious test-taking behavior in low stakes assessment to provide medical schools with practical recommendations on how test-taking effort might be increased. First, we identified strategies that wer...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

A thorny path: the developmental course of problem-based learning for health sciences education in Asia
AbstractProblem-based learning (PBL), has been in existence for half a century as of 2019 and still remains the most innovative medical education innovation due to its revolutionary pedagogical approach characterized by student-centered learning (SCL) and self-directed learning (SDL) using simulated real-life scenarios as the learning platform. Here, learning becomes more self-driven, meaningful and relevant, pertaining to the social accountability principle of higher education. Being popular worldwide and driven by a strong demand for medical education reform during the past two decades, PBL has rapidly swept across the m...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Role of team dynamics in the learning process: a mixed-methods evaluation of a modified team-based learning approach in a behavioral research methods course
AbstractHealth sciences education is increasingly focusing on building students ’ skills to work collaboratively. Therefore, instructors must intentionally incorporate team-based skill building into their courses, using teaching strategies like team-based learning (TBL). An assumption of TBL is that team dynamics facilitate learning; however, limited research has examined thi s connection. The primary purposes of this mixed-methods evaluation were: (a) to describe the characteristics of team dynamics in a graduate-level research methods course that employs a modified TBL approach, and (b) to examine the association b...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

The case for plural PBL: an analysis of dominant and marginalized perspectives in the globalization of problem-based learning
AbstractThe globalization of problem-based learning (PBL) in health professions education has been both celebrated and criticized. Using a critical narrative review approach, underpinned by our archive of global PBL literature and a targeted literature search, we analyze these dominant global discourses of PBL in health professions education. More precisely, we explore what is missed when the globalization of PBL is theorized either as a positive consequence of standardization, or a problematic spread of Western educational ideals and values around the world. We make visible how two dominant global discourses, a universali...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Correction to: Assessing the effects of an empathy education program using psychometric instruments and brain fMRI
Due to an unfortunate turn of events, the funding note was omitted from the original publication. The correct funding note is published here and should be treated as definitive. (Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Evidence-based medicine and problem based learning a critical re-evaluation
AbstractEvidence-based medicine (EBM) has been the subject of controversy since it was introduced in 1992. However, it has yet to be critically examined as an alternative paradigm for medical education, which is how it was proposed. This commentary examines EBM on the terms on which it was originally advanced and within the context that gave rise to it, the problem-based learning (PBL) environment at McMaster University in the 1970s and 80s. The EBM educational prescription is revealed to be aligned with the information processing psychology (IPP) model of learning through acquisition of general problem solving skills that...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Behind the times: a brief history of motivation discourse in problem-based learning
AbstractThat idea that problem-based learning  (PBL) is more motivating that traditional education has been prevalent since the inception of PBL at McMaster University in the late 1960s. Evidencing this through empirical research, however, has proven to be a lot more problematic. This paper retraces how the discourse on motivation started from a laymen’s conception in the early days of PBL, and slowly evolved into a field of scientific inquiry in the 1980s and 1990s. However, looking at the evolution of motivation theory over the same period, we show that motivation discourse in the burgeoning literature on moti...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Ready, willing and able: a model to explain successful use of feedback
AbstractEducators have long noticed differences in how students receive and use feedback. Despite the development of best practice guidelines, some learners in the health professions still struggle to incorporate corrective feedback. To date, little research has been done to examine learner characteristics and how those traits might explain differences in feedback-related behavior. A qualitative study using a constructivist, grounded theory approach was conducted to examine the behaviors and learner characteristics that contribute to successful use of feedback. Medical and physician assistant students in their clinical yea...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Opening the black box of selection
AbstractMedical school selection is currently in the paradoxical situation in which selection tools may predict study outcomes, but which constructs are actually doing the predicting is unknown (the ‘black box of selection’). Therefore, our research focused on those constructs, answering the question: do the internal structures of the tests in an outcome-based selection procedure reflect the content that was intended to be measured? Downing’s validity framework was applied to organize evi dence for construct validity, focusing on evidence related to content and internal structure. The applied selection pr...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

PBL and sustainable education: addressing the problem of isolation
AbstractProblem-based learning (PBL) is an innovative educational approach that dates back to the 1960s. However, the twenty-first century goal of sustainable education poses a challenge to PBL, especially as it relates to isolation. Here we discuss the underlying issue of isolation in three respects. First, the information-processing model of PBL depends on generalized skills, whereas real life problem-solving skills involve context-bound cognitive processes. Second, in all models of PBL, the focus on knowledge acquisition for a specific problem improves performance but separates education from the world at large. Third, ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

The “things themselves”: challenging heuristics and inciting empathy via Husserlian phenomenology
AbstractI propose that the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl provides a meaningful mode of access to the patient experience. By reflecting on a real-life encounter with grief, my own medical training, and two works of literature,Nausea andLove in the Time of Cholera, I illustrate the application of philosophy and specifically phenomenology to clinical education. Phenomenology allows clinicians to strip away assumptions, habits of thinking, and normative ideas within the clinical encounter in order to enter the descriptive world of the patient. In suspending presuppositions and heuristics, the clinician can better empathize w...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Assessment in the context of problem-based learning
AbstractArguably, constructive alignment has been the major challenge for assessment in the context of problem-based learning (PBL). PBL focuses on promoting abilities such as clinical reasoning, team skills and metacognition. PBL also aims to foster self-directed learning and deep learning as opposed to rote learning. This has incentivized researchers in assessment to find possible solutions. Originally, these solutions were sought in developing the right instruments to measure these PBL-related skills. The search for these instruments has been accelerated by the emergence of competency-based education. With competency-ba...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Statistics 101
(Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - October 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Assessing the effects of an empathy education program using psychometric instruments and brain fMRI
This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effects of an empathy education program, and (2) explore functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as a potential empathy assessment tool. An empathy enhancement program for premedical students was developed. The Korean version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Student version (JSE-S) and Interpersonal Reactivity Index (K-IRI) were used to measure self-assessed changes in empathy. Clinical vignettes demonstrating empathy tasks were presented to participants undergoing fMRI, to assess regional changes in the brain. Self-reported empathy scores and brain activity signals using fMRI fro...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - September 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

A view from the sender side of feedback: anticipated receptivity to clinical feedback when changing prior physicians ’ clinical decisions—a mixed methods study
This study explored facilitators of and barriers to feedback communication in the context of patient care transitions using an exploratory sequential, qualitative to quantitative, mixed methods design. Twenty-two internal medicine residents and hospitalist physic ians from two teaching hospitals were interviewed and data were analyzed thematically. A prominent theme was participants’ reluctance to communicate diagnostic changes. Participants perceived case complexity and physical proximity to facilitate, and hierarchy, unfamiliarity with the prior physicia n, and lack of relationship to inhibit communication. In the ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - September 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Female victims and female perpetrators: medical students ’ narratives of gender dynamics and professionalism dilemmas
AbstractMedicine is a gendered discipline, in which women, both as patients and practitioners, have often held subordinate positions. The reproduction of dominant gender biases in the medical setting can negatively impact the professional development of medical students and the wellbeing of patients. In this analysis of medical students ’ narratives of professionalism dilemmas, we explore students’ experiences of gender bias in hospital settings. Seventy-one students participated in 12 group interviews, where they discussed witnessing or participating in various activities that they thought were professionalism...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - September 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Disabled healthcare professionals ’ diverse, embodied, and socially embedded experiences
AbstractDisabled people are underrepresented within healthcare professions, although their participation has potential benefits for them personally, and for broader society. Disabled peoples ’ participation in healthcare professions is limited by assumptions about disability. Little research explores how healthcare professions can be organized to support disabled peoples’ employment. Within a critical realist paradigm influenced by grounded theory, this study used interviews to expl ore the experiences of 56 disabled healthcare clinicians and students, and advance a conceptual taxonomy of disability experience ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - September 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Shadow systems in assessment: how supervisors make progress decisions in practice
In this study we explored how supervisors make decisions on trainee progress in practice. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 19 supervisors of postgraduate anesthesia training across Australia and New Zealand and undertook thematic analysis of the transcripts. Supervisors looked beyond the formal assessment portfolio when making performance decisions. They instead used assessment ‘shadow systems’ based on their own observation and confidential judgements from trusted colleagues. Supervisors’ decision making involved expert judgement of the perceived salient aspects of performance and the standar...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - September 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Student dignity during work-integrated learning: a qualitative study exploring student and supervisors ’ perspectives
This study extends WIL research based on student perspectives in healthcare, and provides practice and further research guidan ce to enhance student dignity during WIL. (Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - September 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

McMaster at 50: lessons learned from five decades of PBL
We describe these changes in four broad domains —theoretical rationale, the curriculum, assessment and admissions. (Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - August 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

From prescription to guidance: a European framework for generic competencies
This study proposes an alternative strategy for competency-based medical education design, which is supported by change management theories. We demonstrate the value of allowing room for re-invention and creative adaptation of innovations. This new strategy was explored for the development of a new generic competency framework for a harmonised European curriculum in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The generic competency framework was developed through action research. Data were collected by four European stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, midwives and hospital boards), using a variety of methods. Subsequently, the data were...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - August 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Problematizing assumptions about interdisciplinary research: implications for health professions education research
This article critically examines three assumptions underlying recent efforts to advance interdisciplinary research —defined in this article as communication and collaboration between researchers across academic disciplines (e.g. Sociology, Psychology, Biology)—and examines these assumptions’ implications for health professions education research (HPER). These assumptions are: (1) disciplines are silos that inhibit the free flowing of knowledge across fields and stifle innovative thinking; (2) interdisciplinary research generates a better understanding of the world as it brings together researchers from va...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - August 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

“ I didn’t realise they had such a key role .” Impact of medical education curriculum change on medical student interactions with nurses: a qualitative exploratory study of student perceptions
AbstractInterprofessional teamwork between healthcare professionals is integral to the delivery of safe high-quality patient care in all settings. Recent reforms of medical education curricula incorporate specific educational opportunities that aim to foster successful interprofessional collaboration and teamwork. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of curriculum reform on medical students ’ perceptions of their interactions and team-working with nurses. We gathered data from 12 semi-structured individual narrative interviews with a purposive sample of male (n = 6) and female (n =&thi...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - August 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Preparedness for advancing future health: a national qualitative exploration of dietetics graduates ’ experiences
This study aimed to explore a national sample of dietetics graduates ’ experiences of, and challenges faced in, dietetics workforce preparation and preparedness in Australia. An interpretive description methodology guided this study whereby researchers interpreted the meanings that participants attributed to their experiences. Twenty dietitians (graduated within th e last 2 years) were purposively sampled from across Australia and detailed insights were obtained through semi-structured interviews. A multi-analyst approach employing thematic and template analysis, enabled five themes to be identified across the d...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - August 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

“It’s yours to take”: generating learner feedback literacy in the workplace
AbstractFeedback can improve students ’ learning and performance on clinical placements, yet students are often dissatisfied with the process. Attempts to improve feedback frequently focus on faculty development programs without addressing learners’ capabilities to engage with feedback. For feedback to be effective, students need to understand its processes and to translate this into practice. Developing student feedback literacy may enhance feedback engagement and, therefore, learning outcomes. This qualitative interview study aimed to problematise student feedback literacy in the healthcare setting, from the ...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - August 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Adaptive instruction and learner interactivity in online learning: a randomized trial
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate two online instructional design features, namely adaptation to learner prior knowledge and use of questions to enhance interactivity in online portrayals of physician –patient encounters, in the context of instructing surgical specialists to deliver perioperative tobacco interventions. An online learning module on perioperative tobacco control was developed, in formats incorporating permutations of adaptive/non-adaptive and high/low interactivity (i.e., 2 ×  2 factorial design). Participants (a national sample of US anesthesiology residents) were r...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - August 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

It ’s the destination: diagnostic accuracy and reasoning
AbstractWhile multiple theories exist to explain the diagnostic process, there are few available assessments that reliably determine diagnostic competence in trainees. Most methods focus on aspects of the process of diagnostic reasoning, such as the relation between case features and diagnostic hypotheses. Inevitably, detailed elucidation of aspects of the process requires substantial time per case and limits the number of cases that can be examined given a limited testing time. Shifting assessment to the outcome of diagnostic reasoning, accuracy of the diagnosis, may serve as a reliable measure of diagnostic competence an...
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - July 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research

Coming and going
(Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education)
Source: Advances in Health Sciences Education - July 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research