Masthead
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

A Tale of Two Failures: A Guide to Shared Decision-Making for Heart and Renal Failure
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Hesham Shaban, Jerry Yee (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Cardiorenal Syndrome: A Call to Action for a Pressing Medical Issue
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Peter A. McCullough, Sandeep Soman (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Cardiorenal Syndrome: An Overview
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Claudio Ronco, Antonio Bellasi, Luca Di LulloIt is well established that a large number of patients with acute decompensated heart failure present with various degrees of heart and kidney dysfunction usually primary disease of heart or kidney often involve dysfunction or injury to the other. The term cardiorenal syndrome increasingly had been used without a consistent or well-accepted definition. To include the vast array of interrelated derangements and to stress the bidirectional nature of heart-kidney interactions, a...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Epidemiology of Cardiorenal Syndrome
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Junior UdumanCardiorenal syndrome is a spectrum of disorders that emphasizes the bidirectional nature of cardiac and kidney injury. Observational and retrospective studies have helped us to understand the prevalence and burden of each of the 5 types of cardiorenal syndromes. Cardiorenal syndrome type 1 is the most common. The nature of epidemiologic data limits clear delineation between cardiorenal syndrome types 2 and 4. Overall, the presence of cardiac or renal dysfunction strongly predicts a poor outcome of the contr...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Pathophysiological Mechanisms in Cardiorenal Syndrome
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Janani Rangaswami, Roy O. MathewCardiorenal syndrome represents the confluence of intricate hemodynamic, neurohormonal, and inflammatory pathways that initiate and propagate the maladaptive cross talk between the heart and kidneys. Several of these pathophysiological principles were described in older historical experiments. The last decade has witnessed major efforts in streamlining its definition, clinical phenotypes, and classification to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver optimal goal-directed medical therapies...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Heart–Kidney Interactions in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Alberto Palazzuoli, Gaetano RuoccoThe exact significance of kidney function deterioration during acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) episodes is still under debate. Several studies reported a wide percentage of worsening renal function (WRF) in ADHF patients ranging from 20% to 40%. This is probably because of different populations enrolled with different baseline kidney and cardiac function, varying definition of acute kidney injury (AKI), etiology of kidney dysfunction (KD), and occurrence of transient or permane...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Toward Precision Medicine in the Cardiorenal Syndrome
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Nicholas Wettersten, Alan S. Maisel, Dinna N. CruzAlthough the field of oncology has made significant steps toward individualized precision medicine, cardiology and nephrology still often use a “one size fits all” approach. This applies to the intersection of the heart-kidney interaction and the cardiorenal syndrome as well. Recent studies have shown that the prognostic implications of worsening renal function (WRF) in acute heart failure are variable; thus, there is a need to differentiate the implications ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Diuretics in the Management of Cardiorenal Syndrome
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Chandrika Chitturi, James E. NovakThe leading cause of death worldwide is cardiovascular disease. The heart and the kidneys are functionally interdependent, such that dysfunction in one organ may cause dysfunction in the other. By one estimate, more than 60% of patients with congestive heart failure develop chronic kidney disease. Volume overload and congestion are hallmarks of heart failure, and these findings are associated with severe symptoms and poor outcomes. Given the importance of congestion, diuretics remain a ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Extracorporeal Isolated Ultrafiltration for Management of Congestion in Heart Failure and Cardiorenal Syndrome
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Amir Kazory, Maria Rosa CostanzoAcute decompensated heart failure has the highest rate of hospital readmission among all medical conditions and portends a significant financial burden on health care system. Congestion, the hallmark of acute decompensated heart failure, represents the primary reason for hospitalization and the driver of adverse outcomes in these patients. Although diuretic-based medical regimens remain the mainstay of management of acute decompensated heart failure, they often show suboptimal efficacy an...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Advanced Heart Failure Therapies and Cardiorenal Syndrome
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Jennifer A. Cowger, Ryhm RadjefHeart failure (HF) is extremely prevalent and for those with end-stage (stage D) disease, 1-year survival is only 25-50%. Several studies have captured the mortality impact of kidney disease on patients with HF, and measures of kidney function are a component of many HF risk stratification scores. The management of advanced HF complicated by cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is challenging, and irreversible kidney failure often limits patient candidacy for advanced HF therapies, such as transplan...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Working Toward an Improved Understanding of Chronic Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 4
Publication date: September 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 5Author(s): Daniel Edmonston, Jessica D. Morris, John P. MiddletonChronic diseases of the heart and of the kidneys commonly coexist in individuals. Certainly combined and persistent heart and kidney failure can arise from a common pathologic insult, for example, as a consequence of poorly controlled hypertension or of severe diffuse arterial disease. However, strong evidence is emerging to suggest that cross talk exists between the heart and the kidney. Independent processes are set in motion when kidney function is chronically dim...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - October 9, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

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Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

It Is Really Time for Ammonium Measurement
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Kalani L. Raphael, Jerry Yee (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Renal Tubular Acidosis and the Nephrology Teaching Paradigm
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Daniel Batlle, Jose Arruda (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Hypokalemic Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Patricia G. Vallés, Daniel BatlleDistal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA) is defined as hyperchloremic, non-anion gap metabolic acidosis with impaired urinary acid excretion in the presence of a normal or moderately reduced glomerular filtration rate. Failure in urinary acid excretion results from reduced H+ secretion by intercalated cells in the distal nephron. This results in decreased excretion of NH4+ and other acids collectively referred as titratable acids while urine pH is typically above 5.5 in the face of systemi...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Hyperkalemic Forms of Renal Tubular Acidosis: Clinical and Pathophysiological Aspects
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Daniel Batlle, Jose ArrudaIn contrast to distal type I or classic renal tubular acidosis (RTA) that is associated with hypokalemia, hyperkalemic forms of RTA also occur usually in the setting of mild-to-moderate CKD. Two pathogenic types of hyperkalemic metabolic acidosis are frequently encountered in adults with underlying CKD. One type, which corresponds to some extent to the animal model of selective aldosterone deficiency (SAD) created experimentally by adrenalectomy and glucocorticoid replacement, is manifested in human...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Renal Tubular Acidosis: H+/Base and Ammonia Transport Abnormalities and Clinical Syndromes
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Ira KurtzRenal tubular acidosis (RTA) represents a group of diseases characterized by (1) a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis; (2) abnormalities in renal HCO3− absorption or new renal HCO3− generation; (3) changes in renal NH4+, Ca2+, K+, and H2O homeostasis; and (4) extrarenal manifestations that provide etiologic diagnostic clues. The focus of this review is to give a general overview of the pathogenesis of the various clinical syndromes causing RTA with a particular emphasis on type I (hypokalemic distal RTA...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Clinical Approach to Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Children
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Gal Finer, Daniel LandauProximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA) is an inherited or acquired clinical syndrome in which there is a decreased bicarbonate reclamation in the proximal tubule resulting in normal anion gap hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. In children, pRTA may be isolated but is often associated with a general proximal tubular dysfunction known as Fanconi syndrome which frequently heralds an underlying systemic disorder from which it arises. When accompanied by Fanconi syndrome, pRTA is characterized by additiona...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Pseudo-Renal Tubular Acidosis: Conditions Mimicking Renal Tubular Acidosis
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Junior Uduman, Jerry YeeHyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, particularly renal tubular acidosis, can pose diagnostic challenges. The laboratory phenotype of a low total carbon dioxide content, normal anion gap, and hyperchloremia may be misconstrued as hypobicarbonatemia from renal tubular acidosis. Several disorders can mimic renal tubular acidosis, and these must be appropriately diagnosed to prevent inadvertent and inappropriate application of alkali therapy. Key physiologic principles and limitations in the assessment of ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Incomplete Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Kidney Stones
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Daniel G. Fuster, Orson W. MoeRenal tubular acidosis (RTA) is comprised of a diverse group of congenital or acquired diseases with the common denominator of defective renal acid excretion with protean manifestation, but in adults, recurrent kidney stones and nephrocalcinosis are mainly found in presentation. Calcium phosphate (CaP) stones and nephrocalcinosis are frequently encountered in distal hypokalemic RTA type I. Alkaline urinary pH, hypocitraturia, and, less frequently, hypercalciuria are the tripartite lithogenic fac...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - August 21, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Masthead
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Diabetes and the Kidney: Sweet Dreams
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): James E. Novak, Jerry Yee (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Diabetic Kidney Disease (c. 2018)
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Katherine R. Tuttle (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

The Global Epidemiology of Diabetes and Kidney Disease
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Digsu N. Koye, Dianna J. Magliano, Robert G. Nelson, Meda E. PavkovThe prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, with the greatest increases occurring in low- and middle-income countries. In most developed countries, type 2 diabetes is presently the leading cause of end-stage renal disease and also contributes substantially to cardiovascular disease. In countries with weaker economies type 2 diabetes is rapidly replacing communicable diseases as a leading cause of kidney disease and is increasingly competing for scarc...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Competing Risk of Death With End-Stage Renal Disease in Diabetic Kidney Disease
We present an example taken from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes, a randomized trial of people with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were stratified according to baseline markers of kidney disease: (1) no kidney disease; (2) low estimated glomerular filtration rate; (3) microalbuminuria alone; and (4) macroalbuminuria. The macroalbuminuria group had the highest risk for ESRD and demonstrated the most marked difference between the Kaplan-Meier and cumulative incidence estimator. Cox and Fine-Gray regression models yielded similar risk estimates for baseline characte...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Glycemic Control as Primary Prevention for Diabetic Kidney Disease
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Richard J. MacIsaac, George Jerums, Elif I. EkinciImproving strategies to prevent the development and progression of CKD is a highly desirable outcome for all involved in the care of patients with diabetes. This is because CKD is a major factor contributing to morbidly and mortality in patients with diabetes. Furthermore, diabetes is the leading cause of ESRD in most developed countries. Although tight glucose control is now an established modality for preventing the development and progression of albuminuria, evidence is n...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

New Glucose-Lowering Agents for Diabetic Kidney Disease
In conclusion, currently available trials have demonstrated renoprotective effects for certain glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, liraglutide and semaglutide, and the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors, empagliflozin and canagliflozin. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors did not show a significant renoprotective effect. Nevertheless, larger studies with respect to renoprotective effects of these 3 drug classes are currently being performed, and thus, no conclusions for all of these agents can yet be made. (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Treatment of Diabetic Kidney Disease With Hypertension Control and Renin Angiotensin System Inhibition
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Vikram Patney, Kunal Chaudhary, Adam Whaley-ConnellThe global incidence and prevalence of diabetes continues to expand due primarily to the influences of obesity and the contribution of obesity to the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes has driven an increase in rates of CKD in the past 3 decades in the United States. In turn, so have the rates for complications related to type 2 diabetes including CKD, eg, diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Although incident rates for DKD have stab...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Acute Kidney Injury and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Samuel Mon-Wei Yu, Joseph V. BonventreDiabetic kidney disease, commonly termed diabetic nephropathy (DN), is the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) worldwide. The characteristic histopathology of DN includes glomerular basement membrane thickening, mesangial expansion, nodular glomerular sclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Diabetes is associated with a number of metabolic derangements, such as reactive oxygen species overproduction, hypoxic state, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammation. In the...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Inflammatory Mechanisms as New Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Diabetic Kidney Disease
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Radica Z. Alicic, Emily J. Johnson, Katherine R. TuttleDiabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the leading cause of CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) worldwide. Approximately 30-40% of people with diabetes develop this microvascular complication, placing them at high risk of losing kidney function as well as of cardiovascular events, infections, and death. Current therapies are ineffective for arresting kidney disease progression and mitigating risks of comorbidities and death among patients with DKD. As the global count of ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Role of Kidney Biopsies for Biomarker Discovery in Diabetic Kidney Disease
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Helen C. Looker, Michael Mauer, Robert G. NelsonAlthough estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria are well-established biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), additional biomarkers are needed, especially for the early stages of the disease when both albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate may still be in the normal range and are less helpful for identifying those at risk of progression. Traditional biomarker studies for early DKD are challenging because of a lack of good early clinical end poin...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

The Promise of Systems Biology for Diabetic Kidney Disease
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): Frank C. Brosius, Wenjun JuDiabetic kidney disease (DKD) has a complex and prolonged pathogenesis involving many cell types in the kidney as well as extrarenal factors. It is clinically silent for many years after the onset of diabetes and usually progresses over decades. Given this complexity, a comprehensive and unbiased molecular approach is best suited to help identify the most critical mechanisms responsible for progression of DKD and those most suited for targeted intervention. Systems biological investigations provid...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Table of Contents for National Kidney Foundation 2018 Spring Clinical Meeting Abstracts April 10-14, 2018
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Implementation of a Program to Manage Transition of Care for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Patients Discharged from the Hospital
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Risk Stratification Tool Evaluation in Renal Transplant Recipients
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Depression and Medication Adherence in Patients on Hemodialysis
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Transition from Pediatric to Adult Dialysis Care in an Adult with Special Considerations Due to Neurocognitive Aspects of Asperger Syndrome
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Peritoneal Dialysis in Octogenerians
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

QI Project to Increase Venipuncture Best Practice in Patients with GFR < 60mg/dl
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Quality of Life in Patients with Early Stage CKD After Mindful Eating Intervention to Improve Self-Management of Dietary Intake
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Masthead
Publication date: May 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 3Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 3Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
Publication date: May 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 3Author(s): (Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease)
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - July 10, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research