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Scarlet fever cases on the rise in England
"More than 3,500 cases of scarlet fever – the vast majority in children – have been reported since September," The Daily Telegraph reports. The news follows a warning from public health officials, that cases of scarlet fever among children have hit levels not seen since 1990. Public Health England, the government agency responsible for infectious disease, has announced that scarlet fever "notifications" are well beyond what they would expect. There have been 3,548 new cases of scarlet fever since September 2013. This is well above the expected levels, given that the average for the same peri...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Urban Myths: Can a coin dropped from a skyscraper kill you?
As Britain unveils a new pound coin, we put to rest once and for all the question of whether falling change can, in fact, be lethalIt's one of Itchy and Scratchy's finest moments. From atop the Empire State Building, the mouse drops a penny. With a fury only the furies could conjure, the metal disc hurtles down with enough speed to incinerate the cat. Classic.But is The Simpsons the perfectly accurate guide to reality we all assume it to be? Is the urban myth true: can a coin dropped from the top of a skyscraper actually kill someone?The short answer, says physicist Jon Butterworth of University College London, is no. It c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Zoe Cormier Tags: theguardian.com Physics Features Cities Science Source Type: news

The soluble fiber in oats helps lower total and LDL cholesterol but the cardiovascular health benefits of oats goes beyond fiber
Eleven top scientists from around the globe presented the latest findings on the powerful compounds found in oats in a scientific session titled, Physicochemical Properties and Biological Functionality of Oats, at the 247th Annual Conference of the American Chemical Society in Dallas, TX. Scientists described research on the diverse health benefits of oats and emphasized the growing evidence that the type of phenolic compound avenanthramide (AVE) - found only in oats - may possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-itch and anti-cancer properties. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Speaking proper: does it matter if we can't pronounce mispronunciation?
Do you say 'expresso' or 'nucular'? Have you ever been confident about how you say bruschetta? Don't worry about it – arguments over pronunciation are mostly proxies for snobbery and class one-upmanshipFor years, I used to think the film reviewer's genre term "biopic" was stressed on the second syllable. You know, like bionic? Only when I at last heard it spoken on the radio as "bio-pic" did I make the connection: oh right, it's a portmanteau of "biographical picture"! Everyone's word-wrangling life is littered with such faintly embarrassing misunderstandings. My erudite dad used to thin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Steven Poole Tags: The Guardian Society Language Features Life and style Science Source Type: news

Got an itch? Allergy to moistened wipes rising, says dermatologist
Spring allergies aren't the only thing to worry about these days. More people are developing an itchy, painful rash in an effort to stay clean. A dermatologist says a preservative in many pre-moistened wipes is linked to a dramatic rise in allergic reactions. The allergen, a chemical preservative referred to as MI, is found in many water-based products like liquid soaps, hair products, sunscreen, cosmetics, laundry products and cleaners as well as pre-moistened personal hygiene products and baby wipes. The irritated skin can be red, raised, itchy and even blistery, appearing much like a reaction to poison ivy. The three mo...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 3, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Health Tip: Is That Itchy Skin Eczema?
Title: Health Tip: Is That Itchy Skin Eczema?Category: Health NewsCreated: 2/28/2014 7:35:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/28/2014 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Skin General)
Source: MedicineNet Skin General - February 28, 2014 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Do You Have a Mole That Itches?
Not long ago, a reader wrote to me about a mole that had become incredibly itchy. She was concerned that because the mole had suddenly became itchy that it may be a symptom of skin cancer. She also mentioned that her mole recently changed from flat to raised. Do you think that she may be experiencing skin cancer symptoms? Check your answer here....Read Full Post (Source: About.com Cancer)
Source: About.com Cancer - February 28, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bits Blog: Fitbit Recalls Force Device After Complaints of Rashes
The company said it would also stop selling the wrist-worn fitness tracker immediately because some customers had reported red, itchy rashes.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - February 22, 2014 Category: Nutrition Authors: By NICK BILTON Tags: Park, James Allergies Recalls and Bans of Products Fitbit Wearable Computing Devices Source Type: news

Jon Ronson is ready for blast-off. Is Richard Branson?
After a 10-year wait, Richard Branson says Virgin Galactic will have lift-off this year: he and his children will be on the first (live televised) flight. What took them so long? Jon Ronson meets him and the 'future astronauts' as they prepare for the ride of their livesIt's dawn at the Mojave Air & Space Port, a cluster of weather-beaten hangars in the desert north of Los Angeles. It looks quite forlorn, in part an elephant's graveyard for half-finished prototype jets designed by visionaries who ran out of money. But it's also a gathering place for freewheeling, maverick space engineers to try out new ideas in th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Jon Ronson Tags: Virgin Group The Guardian Richard Branson Travel & leisure Features Business Science Space Source Type: news

Rachel Prince can't go out in rain because she's allergic to WATER
Rachel Prince, from Ripley, Derbyshire, has been unable to go outdoors for the past month as a single drop of rainfall will cause a painful, itchy red rash. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Psoriasis researchers identify molecular changes responsible for skin discoloration
Itchy, painful rashes -- such as those that occur with psoriasis -- are uncomfortable, but at least they fade when the flare-up subsides. Mostly. Evidence often remains in the form of dark, discolored areas of skin, serving as a reminder of the disease. A new study however, has uncovered the molecular roots of skin discoloration that is often associated with psoriasis, suggesting the possibility of new treatments for pigmentation changes seen not only in psoriasis, but also in other conditions such as eczema and acne. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 16, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Inside the Animal Mind – TV review
Chris Packham, Sir David Attenborough's heir apparent, puts the cool in cagoule in this fascinating blend of science and spectacleI knew dogs were good with their noses. I didn't know they were that good. Fern here – a cutely life-jacketed sprocker (half springer, half cocker) spaniel hanging eagerly over the front of a rubber dinghy – can sniff out a tin of pork under 7m of water and a further metre of silt at the bottom of lake on a howling windy wet day in Northern Ireland. As Chris Packham says, it kind of makes a mockery of those fugitives running down creeks to escape baying bloodhounds in the movies. Mov...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 29, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Sam Wollaston Tags: The Guardian Television industry Biology Culture World news & radio Media Reviews BBC2 Animals Animal behaviour Science amp; radio Source Type: news

Could a jab cure itchy chronic hives?
NEW hope of relief has been given to sufferers of a distressing skin condition which is difficult to diagnose and manage (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More relief options may be available for hay fever sufferers
There is more to seasonal allergies than a little congestion and sneezing. If you notice eating watermelon, cantaloupe or avocado make you cough and itch, it may be a symptom of ragweed allergy. But more help might be on the way for some of the 23 million hay fever sufferers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

ASK THE DOCTOR: What's making my skin so itchy?
Dr Martin Scurr says as well as skin disorders, there are other conditions that can cause itching - and a blood test can help diagnosis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The horrific damage BABY WIPES can do to children's skin: Chemical in the wipes can cause an itchy red rash
Researchers at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine found a preservative called methylisothiazolinone in the wipes causes a reaction in some children. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 13, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pain 15 weeks after a full hysterectomy due to fibroid – Jackie’s Story
I had a hysterectomy due to fibroid and swelling of the stomach. I am 51 years of age and I have already gone through the change 10 years ago. I had my operation on the 5th September 2013 and was in hospital for 4 days with breathing problems from the operation. When I came home I had a swollen stomach which was full of blisters which was also on the front of my vagina which was also swollen. When I got home I was hallucinating and sweating the reason for this was because I had an infection. The infection was not on the bikini cut, it was further up and it made its own hole. Brown smelly liquid was pouring from the hole. ...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - December 16, 2013 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Your Stories fibroids post op infection Source Type: news

Pregnancy: When an itch during pregnancy is a sign your baby is at risk
Magdalen Rees developed a severe itch spreading from her tummy to her arms, legs and back, when she was 32 weeks pregnant. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sneezing fits, watery eyes and itchy nose: Are you allergic to your Christmas tree?
If you are always sneezing in December you might think it's just a common cold but you could be suffering from Christmas tree syndrome. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anti-IgE Drug Scratches Itch of Chronic Hives (CME/CE)
BALTIMORE (MedPage Today) -- The anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) monoclonal antibody omalizumab (Xolair) durably eased itch severity in chronic urticaria uncontrolled by antihistamines, a pivotal trial showed. (Source: MedPage Today Allergy)
Source: MedPage Today Allergy - November 13, 2013 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Identification of first genetic mutations linked to atopic dermatitis in African-American children
Two specific genetic variations in people of African descent are responsible for persistent atopic dermatitis (AD), an itchy, inflammatory form of the skin disorder eczema. A new report by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that loss-of-function mutations to Filaggrin-2 (FLG2), a gene that creates a protein responsible for retaining moisture and protecting the skin from environmental irritants, were associated with atopic dermatitis in African American children... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eczema / Psoriasis Source Type: news

Parasitologist grows parasite in her foot
Marlene Thielecke, a student at Berlin’s Charité University Medicine, left the flea in her foot until it became painful and itchy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First genetic mutations linked to atopic dermatitis identified in African-American children
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Two specific genetic variations in people of African descent are responsible for persistent atopic dermatitis, an itchy, inflammatory form of the skin disorder eczema. A new report by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that loss-of-function mutations to Filaggrin-2, a gene that creates a protein responsible for retaining moisture and protecting the skin from environmental irritants, were associated with atopic dermatitis in African American children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 11, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

More Lenient School Lice Policies Bug Some Parents
WASHINGTON (AP) — Some parents are scratching their heads over less restrictive head lice policies that allow children with live bugs in their hair to return to the classroom. And some school nurses are no longer sending home the dreaded “lice note” to other parents with kids in the classroom, alerting them to the possibility of lice in their own child’s precious locks. The policy shift is designed to help keep children from missing class, shield children with lice from embarrassment and protect their privacy. ‘ICKY, BUT NOT DANGEROUS’ “Lice is icky, but it’s not dangerous,&r...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: miketoole Tags: Health Local News CBS Boston Deborah Altschuler Head Lice National Pediculosis Association Newton WBZ Source Type: news

Allergic to gummy bears? Be cautious getting the flu shot
(American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) Do marshmallows make your tongue swell? Gummy bears make you itchy? If you've answered yes and are allergic to gelatin, you will want to take some precautions when getting the flu shot. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

A potential breakthrough for peanut allergy treatment
Peanut allergies are among the most rapidly growing food allergies in the United States. Millions of children are currently living with the condition, with new cases being diagnosed daily. (A recent study shows the number of reported peanut allergies tripled in just over a decade.) And because allergic reactions to peanuts tend to be the most severe—80 to 95 percent of all food allergy deaths are peanut or tree nut related—the trend is a serious cause for concern. But a small pilot study published by the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, may offer hope for the hundred of thousands of families living w...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 4, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tripp Underwood Tags: All posts Food allergies Kids' safety Milk allergies Parenting clinical trial food allergy Dale Umetsu Lynda Schneider peanut allergies Rima Rachid Source Type: news

Therapists Spill: What You Didn’t Know About Therapy
Therapy is highly misunderstood. That’s due to several key reasons. For starters, therapy is conducted behind closed doors, which makes it harder to fully and accurately capture. Clients don’t commonly discuss their sessions with others. Sadly, the stigma of seeking therapy prevents many people from sharing their experiences. “The ‘you must be crazy if you’re in therapy’ myth persists, despite millions of relatively healthy people seeking therapy to overcome a common obstacle or make a good life great,” said Ryan Howes, a clinical psychologist in Pasadena, Calif. Even if clients ta...
Source: Psych Central - November 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Psychology Psychotherapy Therapists Spill Treatment Calif California Clinical Psychology Deborah Serani director Family therapy jeffrey sumber John Duffy joyce marter Llc Marla W. Deibler Psychoanalysis Source Type: news

Prevent winter from weathering your skin - ten tips for stopping that 'winter itch'
All winter flakes are not made of snow. Cold weather, with its low relative humidity, wreaks havoc on our skin, making it dry and flaky. Skin dries out if it's deprived of moisture and this dryness often aggravates itchiness, resulting in a condition commonly referred to as "winter itch." During the winter the air is drier, and indoor heating further depletes your skin of moisture. Fortunately, there are several ways that you can replenish the water content of your skin. Dr... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Itch maintains regulatory T cell stability
Regulatory T cells (Tregs) function to suppress immune responses of other cells, and their dysfunction has been associated with development of immune disorders. Recent studies suggest that Tregs maintain plasticity even after differentiation, and can be influenced to change their regulatory profile. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Yun-Cai Liu and colleagues at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch as a regulator of Tregs stability... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Immune System / Vaccines Source Type: news

Allergy to bee stings could be a protective mechanism
Allergy to the venom in bee stings may be an immune response that prepares the body to withstand a potentially fatal dose of the poison, according to new research from Stanford University School of Medicine. For most people, a bee sting results in some temporary pain and discomfort. But a small minority have a severe allergic reaction known as anaphylactic shock, which includes a drop in blood pressure, itchy hives and breathing problems, and can cause death if not treated straight away... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Allergy Source Type: news

JCI early table of contents for Oct. 25, 2013
(Journal of Clinical Investigation) This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Oct. 25, 2013 in the JCI: Ionizing radiation exposure promotes fusion oncogene formation, Researchers track lethal prostate cancer to determine clonal origin, Reduction of reactive oxygen species in diabetes-associated nephrology, Synthetic vitamin D receptor ligands reduce murine kidney fibrosis, Itch maintains regulatory T cell stability, Essential amino acid supplementation in patients following total knee arthroplasty (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 25, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chronic itching 'may be caused by pain neurons'
Uncontrollable chronic itching, often a symptom of eczema and psoriasis, is completely different from the temporary, milder itching a person experiences through a mosquito bite. And now, scientists say they have uncovered the mechanisms as to why this is. Researchers from the US and China say that as well as involving the usual suspects that transmit itch signals - "itch" nerve cells or neurons - chronic itching also utilizes pain neurons, intensifying the sensation of the itch... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Scientists unravel mechanisms in chronic itching
(Washington University School of Medicine) New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that chronic itching, which can occur in many medical conditions, is different from the urge to scratch a mosquito bite. Chronic itching appears to incorporate more than just the nerve cells that normally transmit itch signals. In chronic itching, neurons that send itch signals also co-opt pain neurons to intensify the itch sensation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 15, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

JCI early table of contents for Oct. 15, 2013
(Journal of Clinical Investigation) This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Oct. 15, 2013, in the JCI: Type III TGF-beta receptor promotes FGF2-mediated neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma, Induction of myelodysplasia by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, Hirschsprung-like disease is exacerbated by reduced de novo GMP synthesis, Allogeneic T-cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network, Chronic itch development in sensory neurons requires BRAF signaling pathways, and more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 15, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA files Genentech's supplemental biologics license application of Xolair (omalizumab) for chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU)
CIU is a skin condition characterized by red, swollen, itchy hives on the skin. Currently, H1-antihistamines are the only approved therapy for patients suffering from CIU, also known as chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). FDA decision on sBLA expected during second quarter of 2014. Roche today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted and filed the company’s supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for subcutaneous use of Xolair (omalizumab) in people with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), a form of chronic hives who remained symptomatic despite treatment with H1-antihistamin...
Source: Roche Investor Update - October 11, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Omalizumab Reduces Itch of Severe Chronic UrticariaOmalizumab Reduces Itch of Severe Chronic Urticaria
Swiss drugmaker Novartis said on Saturday its drug omalizumab (Xolair) proved significantly more effective than placebo for patients with a severe form of hives in a late-stage study. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - October 7, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Dermatology News Source Type: news

Symptoms of eczema could be prevented by blocking nerve cells
A new picture of how the nervous system interacts with the immune system to cause the itch and inflammation associated with eczema, a chronic skin disease, could lead to new therapies for the condition, according to University of California, Berkeley, scientists. Some 10 percent of the population suffers from eczema, or atopic dermatitis, at some point in their lives, but there are no cures or even good treatments for it... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eczema / Psoriasis Source Type: news

Novartis says drug reduces itch of severe chronic hives
ZURICH (Reuters) - Swiss drugmaker Novartis said on Saturday its drug omalizumab was almost doubly effective in improving quality of life for patients with a severe form of hives, compared with a placebo, according to a late-stage study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Lab Notes: Red Wine Good for Cancer, Too?
(MedPage Today) -- The red wine compound resveratrol, once inside cells, appears to slow their division. Also this week, electrical stimulation for stroke recovery and scratching the eczema itch. (Source: MedPage Today State Required CME)
Source: MedPage Today State Required CME - October 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Itchy Moles and Skin Cancer
Not long ago, a reader wrote to me about a mole that had become incredibly itchy. She was concerned that because the mole had suddenly became itchy that it may be a symptom of skin cancer. She also mentioned that her mole recently changed from flat to raised. Do you think that she may be experiencing skin cancer symptoms? Check your answer here....Read Full Post (Source: About.com Cancer)
Source: About.com Cancer - September 30, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blame These Bumps on Mosquitoes?
Multiple itchy red bumps on a man’s ankles; relative contraindications to lumbar puncture; stroke in an addict. . . 5 more questions for you to test the breadth of your clinical knowledge. (Source: Consultant Live)
Source: Consultant Live - September 26, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Skin Lesions on a 12-Year-Old Patient
A 12-year-old boy presents with numerous itchy skin lesion on his arms. What is your diagnosis? (Source: Cancer Network)
Source: Cancer Network - September 23, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Choices For Seasonal Flu Vaccines
WebMD Health News By Brenda Goodman, MA Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD Sept. 17, 2013 — It’s fall. The kids are back at school, college football rivalries are in high gear, and — oh, yeah — it’s time to get a flu vaccine. In the past, flu protection basically boiled down to a choice between a shot or a sniff of a nasal spray. But this year there are new options. Some may protect you from additional strains of flu, while others make getting vaccinated a little easier. Read on to find out which may be best for you and your family. Trivalent Vaccines These are the traditional flu shots. They pr...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mreal197 Tags: WebMD News Source Type: news

Bed Bug Bites
The patient assumed that the itchy rash was due to insect bites. The shape, size, color, and presence of 6 legs of the insect he captured were consistent with bedbugs and bedbug bites. (Source: Consultant Live)
Source: Consultant Live - September 13, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

NHS hepatitis C infection warning for women
Women who gave birth or had an obstetric or gynaecological operation at 16 UK hospitals between 1975 and 2003 may have come into contact with a healthcare worker infected with hepatitis C. While the risk of infection is small, the numbers affected likely to be few and the health consequences may not be particularly noticeable, concerned women should seek help and advice. It has recently come to light that the healthcare worker transmitted the virus to two patients while working at Caerphilly District Miners Hospital in Wales from 1984 until they stopped working with patients in 2002. Fewer than 400 women in England have so...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Pets health: What are the woodland mites that make my dog's feet itch?
David Grant answers your pets health questions each week in the Express. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Myths & Truths about Tourette Syndrome
This study also found a decrease in tics in adults who received CBIT. Unfortunately, behavior therapy isn’t widely available. Medication is used more frequently to treat tics. Doctors typically prescribe clonidine or guanfacine as the first line of treatment, Woods said. They also may prescribe atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, he added. 4. Myth: Teaching kids to suppress one tic will trigger more or different tics. Fact: Research has found that when kids successfully suppress their tics, they don’t experience an increase in tics. One study even found that after the suppression condition, tics decr...
Source: Psych Central - August 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Atypical Antipsychotics Children and Teens Disorders General Medications Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Behavior Therapy CBIT Clinical Psychologist Commo Source Type: news

New Topic Page: Psoriatic Arthritis
Visit the new MedlinePlus Health Topic page on Psoriatic Arthritis. Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales. You usually get them on your elbows, knees, scalp, back, face, palms and feet... (Source: What's New on MedlinePlus)
Source: What's New on MedlinePlus - August 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bad driving: what are we thinking?
New laws to curb dangerous driving highlight the fascinating psychology of the roadLast week the UK government announced a crackdown on unsafe driving. From now on, those of us spotted tailgating or lane hogging will face on-the-spot fines of £100 and three penalty points. As road safety minister Stephen Hammond said: "Careless driving puts innocent people's lives at risk. That is why we have made it easier for the police to tackle problem drivers."This initiative draws attention to a fascinating branch of science called traffic psychology, which studies the human and environmental factors that influence ou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 19, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Chris Chambers Tags: Psychology theguardian.com Blogposts Road safety Road transport Neuroscience Source Type: news

Worms, search engines and porn filters | Richard P Grant
If David Cameron's porn filters had been active in 2003, the history of molecular biology might have been very differentThe furore over the ridiculous plan to force ISPs to make customers opt-in to 'adult content' (presumably such things as mortgage applications, online tax returns, etc.) reminds of a story regarding scholarly publishing.Back in the day, I was doing research in a small group in a not-obscure Laboratory in the Fens. My boss was on the editorial board of a well-respected, yet not exactly popular, journal. The sort of journal in which you would publish good, solid science that wasn't going to excite people ou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Richard P Grant Tags: theguardian.com Blogposts Science Source Type: news