Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 12th 2021
In conclusion, the MR exhibited the protective effects against age-related behavioral disorders, which could be partly explained by activating circulating FGF21 and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis, and consequently suppressing the neuroinflammation and oxidative damages. These results demonstrate that FGF21 can be used as a potential nutritional factor in dietary restriction-based strategies for improving cognition associated with neurodegeneration disorders. Senescent T Cells Cause Changes in Fat Tissue that are Harmful to Long-Term Health https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/04/senescent-t-cells-cause-...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Latest Data from the Interventions Testing Program: Nicotinamide Riboside has No Effect on Mouse Life Span
The Interventions Testing Program (ITP) at the National Institute on Aging runs very rigorous, costly life span studies in large numbers of mice, picking a few interventions to test each year. The usual outcome is that a treatment with some interesting past results is found to have absolutely no effect on life span when run through the rigor of the ITP process. We should all bear this in mind whenever modest life span extension in mice is reported by researchers elsewhere in the community. Based on past ITP data, a great many such results are the result of chance or poor experimental design. Will the ITP ever get ar...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Recent Thought on Alzheimer's Disease as a Lifestyle Condition
The overwhelming majority of type 2 diabetes patients suffer their condition because they became significantly overweight. Being significantly overweight clearly produces the metabolic syndrome that leads to type 2 diabetes, and the more visceral fat tissue, the worse off you are. In this sense type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle condition, a choice. Attempting to explain Alzheimer's disease in the same way runs into an immediate challenge, in that there is no such very clear cause and effect. Too large a fraction of significantly overweight people do not develop Alzheimer's, and being overweight doesn't appear to correlate wit...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 8, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Better Diet and Regular Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Health in Later Life
A sensible diet and adherence to a program of regular exercise have a meaningful effect on late life health, as illustrated by this epidemiological study. Therapies that target the mechanisms of aging are still in the early stages of development, and few have shown impressive results in mice, let alone humans. Exercise and the practice of calorie restriction outperform near all such treatment for which robust animal or human data has been established. This will change in years ahead, but it will never be a good idea to neglect the basics of good health. Following a routine of regular physical activity combined wit...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 8, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 5th 2021
In this study, the research team designed a way to identify small molecules that improve the function of ABCA1 in the body while avoiding unwanted effects to the liver. The researchers honed in on a specific small molecule, CL2-57, due to its ability to stimulate ABCA1 activity with positive effects on liver and plasma triglycerides. The use of this compound showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, as well as reduced weight gain, among other beneficial effects. Age-Related Upregulation of Autophagy as a Possible Contribution to Bat Longevity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/04/age-rela...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 4, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Tau Knockout in Normal Mice Improves Mitochondrial Function and Slows Cognitive Decline
Tau is involved in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies; it is one of the few proteins in the body capable of becoming naturally altered in ways that encourage aggregation of the protein into solid deposits that are toxic to cells. Tau is highly expressed in nerve cells, and helps in the function of the microtubule network of the cell. It also has roles in other processes peculiar to nerve cells, such as synaptic transmission. Mice lacking tau exhibit issues with regulation of insulin metabolism and behavior. That isn't preventing the exploration of lowered tau levels as a basis for therapies to treat Alzheimer's dise...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 2, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Age-Related Upregulation of Autophagy as a Possible Contribution to Bat Longevity
Bat species include many that are long-lived for their size. Flying species in general are long lived; one can find many similarities in metabolism between bats and birds. It may be the case that the much higher metabolic rate of flying species requires improved mechanisms of cell resilience and cell maintenance that have the side-effect of better resisting the damage of aging. On the cell resilience side, the membrane pacemaker hypothesis considers that longer-lived species have cell membranes more resistant to oxidation by the byproducts of metabolic activity. On the cell maintenance side, we have studies such as this on...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 1, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Cholesterol Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Age-Related Conditions
In this study, the research team designed a way to identify small molecules that improve the function of ABCA1 in the body while avoiding unwanted effects to the liver. The researchers honed in on a specific small molecule, CL2-57, due to its ability to stimulate ABCA1 activity with positive effects on liver and plasma triglycerides. The use of this compound showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, as well as reduced weight gain, among other beneficial effects. Link: https://healthsciences.arizona.edu/newsroom/news-releases/2021/cholesterol-may-be-key-new-therapies-alzheimers-disease-diabetes (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - April 1, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Supplementation with Glutathione Precursors Improves Mitochondrial Function, Reduces Oxidative Stress and Inflammation
Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, turning out the chemical energy store molecule ATP that is needed to power cellular processes. Mitochondrial function declines with age, and this faltering of energy production is an important contribution to degenerative aging. A broad range of proximate causes have been identified, changes in gene expression that directly or indirectly disrupt the supply of rate-limiting molecules necessary for mitochondria to carry out their work. Researchers identified loss of NAD+ as one of those issues some years ago, and supplementation with precursor compounds derived from vitamin B3 (...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 31, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Digital Therapeutics, Megan & Me!
Anyone who follows me knows that I’ve been questioning whether digital therapeutics are real and more importantly whether the people building and trying to sell them are simply trying to replicate the American drug pricing model–patent, protect, prescribe & price gouge. So who better to have this conversation with than the person in charge of explaining and selling the notion of digital therapeutics to the world? Megan Coder is Executive Director of the Digital Therapeutics Alliance. She graciously and bravely agreed to talk to me. Who won the argument? You’ll have to watch to decide, but I found our ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 31, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Tech Matthew Holt digital therapeutics dtx Megan Coder Source Type: blogs

Health Care Needs Better Marketing, Too
John Halamka, M.D., president, Mayo Clinic Platform, and Paul Cerrato, senior research analyst and communications specialist, Mayo Clinic Platform, wrote this article.Inspiration comes in all sizes and shapes. Neil deGrasse Tyson, a world-renowned astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, continues to inspire us with words like, “The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it. ” Amidst all the confusion and debate in the popular press about health science, this form of uncommon sense needs more media attention. It’s a truism that may have prom...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - March 30, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Top 10 Hazards Of Technology In Digital Health
Thanks to the advent of digital health, the future of medicine is truly exciting. With technological advancements that democratise access to care, better treatments are accessible to people than ever before. Breakthrough research and medical developments have eradicated deadly diseases and turned others into manageable conditions. But the very developments that propel healthcare to the 21st century bring their own share of hazards to the field. From the elimination of privacy through hacked medical devices to bioterrorism, there are signs of alarming trends that few take seriously. Nevertheless, we must generate discussion...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 30, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Bioethics Biotechnology Digital Health Research Healthcare Policy Nanotechnology Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones algorithm ecg google smartwatch wearables GC1 wannacry ransomw Source Type: blogs

TOP 10 Dangers Of Digital Health
Thanks to the advent of digital health, the future of medicine is truly exciting. With technological advancements that democratise access to care, better treatments are accessible to people than ever before. Breakthrough research and medical developments have eradicated deadly diseases and turned others into manageable conditions. But the very developments that propel healthcare to the 21st century bring their own share of hazards to the field. From the elimination of privacy through hacked medical devices to bioterrorism, there are signs of alarming trends that few take seriously. Nevertheless, we must generate discussion...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 30, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Bioethics Biotechnology Digital Health Research Healthcare Policy Nanotechnology Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones algorithm ecg google smartwatch wearables GC1 wannacry ransomw Source Type: blogs

“I Don’t Do Windows” Says the Maid. “I Don’t Do Machines” Says this Doctor – “But I Do Nudge Therapy”
By HANS DUVEFELT The hackneyed windows phrase, about what a domestic employee will and will not do for an employer, represents a concept that applies to the life of a doctor, too. Personally, I have to do Windows, the default computer system of corporate America, even though I despise it. But in my personal life I use iOS on my iPad and iPhone and very rarely use even my slick looking MacBook Pro. I use “tech” and machines as little as possible and I prefer that they work invisibly and intuitively. In medicine, even in what used to be called “general practice”, you can’t very reasonab...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 29th 2021
Discussion of Systemic Inflammation and its Contribution to Dementia Fisetin Reduces D-Galactose Induced Cognitive Loss in Mice Reprogramming Cancer Cells into Normal Somatic Cells Considering Longevity Medicine and the Education of Physicians Researchers Generate Thyroid Organoids Capable of Restoring Function in Mice In Search of Transcriptional Signatures of Aging A Pace of Aging Biomarker Correlates with Manifestations of Aging Targeting Tissues with Extracellular Vesicles Calorie Restriction Slows Aging of the Gut Microbiome in Mice Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy in the Aging Heart Evidence for Hea...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 28, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Considering Rate-Limiting Processes in the Progression of Aging
In this paper, the author argues for greater emphasis to be placed on identifying rate-limiting processes in aging, here termed "flux-controlling" processes. One can tinker with various aspects of cellular metabolism connected to any one given molecule or class of molecules, and do so in many different ways, but any given approach may or may not interact with a rate-limiting step. If it doesn't, then the outcome will not tell us all that much about whether or not this molecule, this process, is important in aging. Let us imagine that Gustav Embden (1874-1933), one of the ingenious discoverers of glycolys...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 26, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Diabetes Meets Machine Learning, Part 2
Continuous glucose monitoring takes center stageJohn Halamka, M.D., president, Mayo Clinic Platform, and Paul Cerrato, senior research analyst and communications specialist, Mayo Clinic Platform, wrote this article.In February, we discussed the benefits ofusing machine learning (ML) to improve screening for diabetes and for managing the disorder. In some situations, ML can more accurately detect the presence of prediabetes, for instance. Similarly, there ’s research to show that the right algorithms can improve the treatment of Type 1 diabetes.  But there ’s also mounting evidence to suggest ML can benefit...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - March 23, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Beyond CBD: Here come the other cannabinoids, but where ’s the evidence?
In the span of a few years, the component of cannabis called CBD (cannabidiol) went from being a relatively obscure molecule to a healthcare fad that has swept the world, spawning billions in sales, millions of users, CBD workout clothing, pillowcases, hamburgers, ice cream — you name it. The concerns of such a rapid adoption are that enthusiasm might be soaring high above the actual science, and that there are safety issues, such as drug interactions, that are given short shrift in the enthusiasm to treat chronic pain, insomnia, anxiety, and many of the other conditions that CBD is believed to help alleviate. Cannab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Drugs and Supplements Fatigue Marijuana Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 22nd 2021
This article expresses sentiments regarding medical technology and human longevity that we'd all like to see more of in the mainstream media. At some point, it will come to be seen by the average person as basically sensible to work towards minimizing the tide of suffering and death caused aging and age-related disease. It has been, in hindsight, a strange thing to live in a world in which most people were reflexively opposed to that goal. Death and aging constitute a mystery. Some of us die more quickly. We often ask about it as children, deny it in youth, and reluctantly come to accept it as adults. Aging is uni...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 21, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Art of Asking: What Else is Going on?
By HANS DUVEFELT Walter Brown’s blood sugars were out of control. Ellen Meek had put on 15 lbs. Diane Meserve’s blood pressure was suddenly 30 points higher than ever before. In Walter’s case, he turned out to have an acute thyroiditis that caused many other symptoms that came to light during our standard Review of Systems. Ellen, it turned out, was pretty sure her husband was having an affair with one of his coworkers. And, since this wasn’t the first time, she was secretly working on a plan to move out and file for divorce. She admitted she’d always had a tendency to stress eat. ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt health communication Source Type: blogs

Flies that Choose a Poor Diet Have a Shorter Lifespan than those Forced into a Poor Diet
This interesting study shows that when given the choice to consume sugar or protein, flies consume a lot of sugar and exhibit reduced life span as a result. Feeding the same proportional mix of sugar and protein to flies without giving them the choice of what to consume does not reduce life span to the same degree, however. The researchers identify specific signaling responsible for this outcome, involved in the neuronal regulation of metabolism, a part of the only partially explored feedback loop between diet and appetite. This is all fascinating, but it is hard to say whether it has any near term relevance to health in h...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 15, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 15th 2021
In conclusion, PLG attenuates high calcium/phosphate-induced vascular calcification by upregulating P53/PTEN signaling in VSMCs. Tsimane and Moseten Hunter-Gatherers Exhibit Minimal Levels of Atrial Fibrillation https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/03/tsimane-and-moseten-hunter-gatherers-exhibit-minimal-levels-of-atrial-fibrillation/ Epidemiological data for the Tsimane and Moseten populations in Bolivia shows that they suffer very little cardiovascular disease in later life, despite a presumably greater lifetime burden of infectious disease (and consequent inflammation) than is the case for people i...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 14, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Binarized Transcriptomic Aging Clock
In this study, we build such a transcriptomic aging clock that predicts the biological age of C. elegans based on high-throughput gene expression data to an unprecedented accuracy. We combine a temporal rescaling approach, to make samples of diverse lifespans comparable, with a novel binarization approach, which overcomes current limitations in the prediction of the biological age. Moreover, we show that the model accurately predicts the effects of several lifespan-affecting factors such as insulin-like signaling, a dysregulated miRNA regulation, the effect of an epigenetic mark, translational efficiency, dietary restricti...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 10, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

GoodRx Upends Healthcare Price Obfuscation
As Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal told NPR in 2017 (listen to or read the interview athttps://n.pr/2OgsDMt -- it was fascinating), Americans are told over and over again that they need to be  good consumers of healthcare services. But she explained that in order to be a good consumer, you need to know a price. Healthcare in the U.S. is one of the few markets in which no one can tell the consumer what the prices for their services actually are. (And she added " P.S., a lot of medicine isn't so elective. Your doctor says hey, you need to have your hip replaced. Or your doctor says, I'm going to fill out a requisition for ...
Source: Scott's Web Log - March 8, 2021 Category: Endocrinology Tags: 2021 GoodRx insulin Source Type: blogs

Correlative Adventures with COVID
By ANISH KOKA “The patient in room 1 should be a quick one, its an addon, they just need a prescription for ivermectin” I’m a bit puzzled by this sentence from my assistant doing his best to help me through a very busy day in the clinic that I’m already behind in. I walk into the room, a script pad stuffed into my hand as I enter the room, to meet a very nice couple.  The wife sits patiently with hands crossed on the exam table.  “So, you’re here for Ivermectin?”, I ask. Why yes, a trip to Texas is planned.. COVID is in the air, the internet, and some importan...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Anish Koka COVID vaccine COVID-19 vaccine Ivermectin Source Type: blogs

Moderna ’s “Secret Sauce”
By MIKE MAGEE This week J&J gained FDA approval for their 1-shot COVID vaccine, leading optimists like Pfizer Board member, Scott Gottlieb, to predict that we will have 100 million shots out there by the end of April, and on-demand offerings for the general public. In the race toward herd immunity, we could easily ignore a revolutionary change in pharmaceutical design and manufacturing occurring under our noses. Case in point: Moderna – subject of a recent case study by Marco Iansiti, Karim Lakhani, Hannah Mayer, and Kerry Herman in the Harvard Business Review. Moderna – labeled by its CEO as &ldqu...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy COVID-19 vaccine J&J COVID Vaccine Mike Magee Moderna vaccine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 1st 2021
This study may have important implications for preventing cell senescence and aging-induced tendinopathy, as well as for the selection of novel therapeutic targets of chronic tendon diseases. Our results showed that the treatment of bleomycin, a DNA damaging agent, induced rat patellar TSC (PTSC) cellular senescence. The senescence was characterized by an increase in the senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, as well as senescence-associated changes in cell morphology. On the other hand, rapamycin could extend lifespan in multiple species, including yeast, fruit flies, and mice, by decelerating DNA dam...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 28, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Candy in My Pocket with John Robert Wiltgen
I had a chance to catch up with John Robert Wiltgen, the fascinating international award-winning JRW Design founder. I’m enjoying his recent blog posts and stories and want to spread the word in case you might enjoy them too. John was diagnosed with diabetes at 8 years old. He’s lived with diabetes for more than 53 years now and has faced many challenges. I enjoy his positive attitude and how he continues to charge forth and do what he loves. Over the course of his life, he built an incredible design business. He’s won more than 40 major design awards, and his work has brought him from Chicago&rsqu...
Source: Scott's Diabetes Blog - February 23, 2021 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Scott K. Johnson Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Data on the Effects of Fecal Microbiota Transplant Between Genders and Ages in Mice
The gut microbiome changes with age, losing populations that produce beneficial metabolites, and gaining populations that produce chronic inflammation and other harms. There are many possible contributions to this process of aging, but it is unclear as to which of them are important. It has been shown in animal studies that performing fecal microbiota transplantation from young to old individuals restores a more youthful gut microbiome for an extended period of time, improving health and extending life span. Researchers here add more data for the short term outcomes of fecal microbial transplantation in mice. Alte...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 23, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Investigating the Mechanisms by which PAPP-A Inhibition Extends Life
Inhibition of PAPP-A is one of the many interventions capable of slowing aging in mice. Being able to slow aging and understanding how exactly that outcome is achieved are two very different things, however. Many of the age-slowing interventions demonstrated in animal studies remain quite poorly understood, insofar as identifying which of the many alterations in metabolism that they cause are important to the progression of aging. Obtaining that understanding is a slow, expensive undertaking, and this hurdle is a roadblock to any further development of these interventions. This challenge is one of the reasons why many of u...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 23, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Diabetes Meets Machine Learning, Part 1
John Halamka, M.D., president, Mayo Clinic Platform, and Paul Cerrato, senior research analyst and communications specialist, Mayo Clinic Platform, wrote this article.Of all the disorders that have responded well to artificial intelligence and machine learning, diabetes mellitus probably tops the list. The evidence supporting a role for Machine Learning (ML)-enhanced algorithms in managing the disease is persuasive and applies to several components of patient care, including screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.Let's start with screening: As most clinicians know, there's a difference between screening for disease...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - February 22, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 22nd 2021
In conclusion, long term LRIC could decrease blood pressure and ameliorate vascular remodeling via inflammation regulation. The Damage of a Heart Attack Causes the Immune System to Overreact https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/02/the-damage-of-a-heart-attack-causes-the-immune-system-to-overreact/ Researchers here note a mechanism that causes T cells of the adaptive immune system to spur chronic inflammation and tissue damage following a heart attack. As the researchers note, not all inflammation is the same. Some is maladaptive, and this is particularly the case in older individuals. The aged immune...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 21, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The link between abdominal fat and death: What is the shape of health?
Body mass index, or BMI, has long been the standard tool for assessing weight status and health risk. A calculation of your size that takes into account your height and weight, BMI is frequently used because it’s a quick, easy, and inexpensive measurement tool. Yet, it lacks any assessment of how much fat a person has or how it’s distributed throughout the body, both of which are key indicators of metabolic health. A recent study published in The BMJ analyzed different measures of body shape — more specifically, of central or abdominal fat — to determine which measures were most predictive of premat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chika Anekwe, MD, MPH Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Needs Its Mary Barra
By KIM BELLARD With all that has been going on, I’ve been remiss in reflecting on General Motor’s big announcement a couple weeks ago: it is going to have an all electric, zero emissions fleet of “light duty” vehicles (cars, SUVs, pickups) by 2035, and be carbon neutral by 2040.  One of the largest manufacturers of internal combustion vehicles for over a hundred years is recognizing that its past is not its future. Of course, I immediately wondered what the equivalent move in healthcare would be, and from whom.    In the announcement, GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra declared: ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech general motorrs general motors Kim Bellard mary barra Source Type: blogs

Health Care Needs Its Mary Barra
By KIM BELLARD With all that has been going on, I’ve been remiss in reflecting on General Motor’s big announcement a couple weeks ago: it is going to have an all electric, zero emissions fleet of “light duty” vehicles (cars, SUVs, pickups) by 2035, and be carbon neutral by 2040.  One of the largest manufacturers of internal combustion vehicles for over a hundred years is recognizing that its past is not its future. Of course, I immediately wondered what the equivalent move in healthcare would be, and from whom.    In the announcement, GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra declared: ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech general motorrs general motors Kim Bellard mary barra Source Type: blogs

The Aging Microvasculature and Alzheimer's Disease
The microvasculature of the body diminishes with age, and this is thought to be a major contributing factor in the progression of age-related loss of organ function, particularly in energy-hungry tissues such as muscles and the brain. Every tissue is densely packed with tiny blood vessels, hundreds of capillaries passing through every square millimeter in cross-section. This small-scale microvasculature is needed in order to efficiently deliver sufficient nutrients to all cells in a tissue. Absent capillaries, perfusion of nutrients is only useful over a very short distance indeed, and its effectiveness declines quickly as...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 16, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 15th 2021
This study assessed cancer risk associations for 3 recently developed methylation-based biomarkers of aging: PhenoAge, GrimAge, and predicted telomere length. We observed relatively strong associations of age-adjusted PhenoAge with risk of colorectal, kidney, lung, mature B-cell, and urothelial cancers. Similar findings were obtained for age-adjusted GrimAge, but the association with lung cancer risk was much larger, after adjustment for smoking status, pack-years, starting age, time since quitting, and other cancer risk factors. Most associations appeared linear, larger than for the first-generation measures, and w...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Forcing Youthful Gene Expression in Old Cells Should in Principle be Beneficial
It is reasonable to expect that forcing the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in cells in old tissue into a pattern more like that of cells in young tissue could be beneficial. Some of these changes in gene expression are clearly entirely maladaptive and detrimental to the health and life span of the organism. All else being equal, reversing those changes, and only those changes, will in principle lead to improved health. In principle is one thing, but will the effect size be large enough in practice, however? We rarely argue over whether specific mechanisms and outcomes exist, but we frequently argue over whether t...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Goal of Geroscience is Life Extension
It is only comparatively recently that the research community has become supportive of efforts to treat aging as a medical condition, with researchers able to publish and speak in public on the topic without risking their careers. Even so, few researchers in this more receptive environment have been willing to be clear that the goal of treating aging is to greatly extend healthy life span, not just improve health within the life span we presently enjoy. We can hope that this too will change, and extending the healthy human life span will also come to be a topic of clear public discussion by the broader scientific community...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How to Navigate Life with a Chronic Disease Like T1D and High-Deductible Insurance Plans
Conclusion:So, this is a method to survive a high-deductible insurance plan without breaking the bank. I have done it, so I know it works. Keep in mind: insurance companies feel entitled to screw patients (you are not their customer, your employer is). Don't let them do it to you! (Source: Scott's Web Log)
Source: Scott's Web Log - February 8, 2021 Category: Endocrinology Tags: 2021 high-deductible insurance plans insulin rebates test strips Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 8th 2021
This study was divided in two phases: CALERIE-1 and CALERIE-2. CALERIE-1 study was performed to assess the possible effects induced by a reduction of 10-30% of caloric intake on body composition parameters and lipid profile after 6 and 12 months in a population of middle-aged non-obese subjects. CALERIE-1 results showed an improvement in lipid and glycemic profile and a reduction in body weight (BW) and fat mass. CALERIE-2 was the largest multi-center study on CRD. A total of 220 subjects were enrolled randomly with a 2:1 allocation into two subgroups: 145 in the CRD group and 75 in the ad libitum group. The CRD gro...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 7, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Practice of Calorie Restriction Reduces Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk
This study was divided in two phases: CALERIE-1 and CALERIE-2. CALERIE-1 study was performed to assess the possible effects induced by a reduction of 10-30% of caloric intake on body composition parameters and lipid profile after 6 and 12 months in a population of middle-aged non-obese subjects. CALERIE-1 results showed an improvement in lipid and glycemic profile and a reduction in body weight (BW) and fat mass. CALERIE-2 was the largest multi-center study on CRD. A total of 220 subjects were enrolled randomly with a 2:1 allocation into two subgroups: 145 in the CRD group and 75 in the ad libitum group. The CRD gro...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 5, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Longevity Gene INDY is Involved in Blood Pressure Control
The INDY gene has been known to affect longevity in a range of species for quite some time, as I noted at length back in 2015. It is more than 20 years now since INDY was first discovered to affect fly aging, and work continues to link the outcomes on life span to specific effects on aging and cell function. INDY has effects on metabolism that look a lot like those connected to calorie restriction. A such, it tends to improve every aspect of aging, making it challenging to sort out what is cause, what is consequence, what is important, and what is a side-effect. The research noted here is a representative example of increm...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 2, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Wearable Danger
This article is written by John Halamka, M.D., president, Mayo Clinic Platform, and Paul Cerrato, senior research analyst and communications specialist, Mayo Clinic Platform.If you ask health care executives what keeps them up at night, many would sum up their worries in one word: ransomware.  By one estimate, 56% of organizations suffered aransomware attack in the last year. While there are countless ways in which a cyberthief can penetrate a facility ’s computer network to block access to essential data, one avenue that gets too little attention is through wearables and related medical devices.  A growing...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - January 26, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

A guide to small LDL particles
The post A guide to small LDL particles appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 18, 2021 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle insulin low-carb undoctored Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 18th 2021
In this study, Desferal, deferoxamine mesylate for injection, which is approved for the treatment of acute iron intoxication and chronic iron overload, was used to explore the beneficial effects on preventing aging-induced bone loss and mitigating dysfunction of aged BMSCs. High-dose Desferal significantly prevented bone loss in aged rats. Compared with controls, the ex vivo experiments showed that short-term Desferal administration could promote the potential of BMSC growth and improve the rebalance of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, as well as rejuvenate senescent BMSCs and revise the expression of stemness/se...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 17, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Targeting Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's Disease
As noted by the authors of today's open access review paper, Alzheimer's disease is just as strongly characterized by chronic inflammation in brain tissue as it is by the presence of aggregates of amyloid-β and phosphorylated tau. More modern views of Alzheimer's disease etiology place more emphasis on chronic inflammation as a cause of pathology, either wrapping it into the amyloid cascade hypothesis, or replacing amyloid-β with inflammatory processes in the progression of the foundational, earlier stage of the condition. The infection-senescence hypothesis, for example, suggests that persistent infection...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A Message from Our President, Medical Mistrust, Insulin Prices: RAND Weekly Recap
This weekly recap focuses on Wednesday ’ s siege on the U.S. Capitol, Americans'psychological distress, medical mistrust and COVID-19 vaccines, and more. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - January 8, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

The Astronomical Price of Insulin Hurts American Families
More than 30 million Americans have diabetes, and nearly a quarter of them use insulin to manage their symptoms and prevent life-threatening complications. The price they have to pay for insulin is more than ten times higher than the average prices in 32 other countries combined. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - January 6, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

Real-time ELISA for Continuous Blood Testing
Though blood tests are a routine part of clinical care and hospital labs are able to quantify a myriad biomarkers, the results only indicate measurements at certain points in time. Continuous monitoring is available for only a few analytes such as glucose and oxygen. Now researchers at Stanford University have created a device that can constantly track concentrations of just about any protein, antibody, or hormone found in blood. The technology is doing to the ubiquitous ELISA tests (Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay) what video did to still photography. It provides a continuous stream of snapshots of readings that can...
Source: Medgadget - January 5, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Emergency Medicine ELISA stanford Source Type: blogs