More asymptomatic testing can be a vital tool to stop the spread of Covid | Susan Hopkins
Local authorities are being called on to expand their plans as well as to support people who need to self-isolateCoronavirus - latest coverageSee all our coronavirus coverageWe now know that around one in three people who have coronavirusnever show any symptoms but that does not mean they are not infectious. We need to use everything at our disposal to find these individuals without symptoms and support them and their contacts to isolate in order to break the chains of transmission.That is why thecommunity testingoffer is being expanded to all local authorities with a particular focus on workplace testing. This expansion w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Susan Hopkins Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science UK news Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Ministry Makes Strides in Preventing HIV Transmission
[The Herald] Herald Reporter (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - January 9, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why the delay? The nations waiting to see how Covid vaccinations unfold
Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan and Japan are among those that won ’t start vaccinating for months, in part to see how other populations react to the jabCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThey are the nations that have been held up as shining examples of coronavirus management. In Australia, New Zealand and Taiwan, daily Covid infections are in the single digits and outbreaks are quickly suppressed.But there is one area where these nations lag well behind the pack in vaccination. Countries with some of the most enviable healthcare systems in the world – including Australia, New Zea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey in Melbourne, Elle Hunt in Auckland and Justin McCurry in Tokyo Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Australia news New Zealand Japan Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

FDA Warns of False Negative COVID Tests From Virus Mutations FDA Warns of False Negative COVID Tests From Virus Mutations
The FDA issued an alert about the potential of mutations, including the B.1.1.7 variant, affecting molecular COVID-19 tests. However, regulators said that risk appears low.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Pfizer Vaccine Appears to Work Against Variant, Research Shows Pfizer Vaccine Appears to Work Against Variant, Research Shows
The lab experiment offers hope that the people who received the Pfizer vaccine will be protected from the variants in real life ― at least in the short term.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Study Confirms Key COVID-19 Risk Factors in Children Study Confirms Key COVID-19 Risk Factors in Children
Of those who tested positive, 66% reported having come into close contact with a person who had COVID-19, and 64% reported that those contacts were family members.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

US Tops 4000 COVID-19 Deaths Reported in 1 Day US Tops 4000 COVID-19 Deaths Reported in 1 Day
Even as the government proceeds with its vaccination program, the US has reported five of its deadliest days in the last 2 weeks.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

COVID-19 Immunity Could Last Longer Than 8 Months, Study Says COVID-19 Immunity Could Last Longer Than 8 Months, Study Says
"That amount of memory [cells] would likely prevent the vast majority of people from getting hospitalized disease, severe disease, for many years," Shane Crotty told The New York Times.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Novel Point-of-Care Test to Distinguish Bacterial From Viral Infection Moves Closer to Clinic Novel Point-of-Care Test to Distinguish Bacterial From Viral Infection Moves Closer to Clinic
In a proof-of-principle study, researchers demonstrated that a two-gene RNA signature can distinguish bacterial from viral infections in blood samples from children.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

US Vaccine Rollout Should Have Been Better, Fauci Says US Vaccine Rollout Should Have Been Better, Fauci Says
"Clearly, no excuses. We should have gotten 20 [million] distributed and 20 [million] into the arms of people," NIAID Director Dr Anthony Fauci told The Economic Club of Washington, D.C.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

As Olympics Loom, Japanese Approval of Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Unlikely Till May As Olympics Loom, Japanese Approval of Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Unlikely Till May
Moderna Inc's COVID-19 vaccine is unlikely to win approval in Japan until May due to requirements for local clinical trials, the distributor said, casting doubt over a nationwide vaccination rollout before the summer Tokyo Olympics.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Guidance on COVID Vaccine Use in Patients With Dermal Fillers Guidance on COVID Vaccine Use in Patients With Dermal Fillers
The SARS-CoV-2 vaccine is associated with inflammatory reactions in patients with dermal fillers and has led the ASDS to issue a guidance outlining the potential risk and clinical relevance.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Dermatology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Dermatology Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Dermatology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Pfizer vaccine protects against new Covid variants, study suggests
Blood sample tests from 20 people show vaccine is effective against UK and South Africa variantsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Covid-19 vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech appears to protect against viruses carrying at least one of the key mutations found intwo coronavirus variants that are causing rapid spread across the UK, according to a study.However, further research is needed to confirm that the level of protection afforded by the vaccine is as high as against older variants – and to ensure it protects against viruses carrying another significant mutation found in the South A...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation UK news World news Pfizer Health Infectious diseases Science Medical research Business Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Roche, Sanofi Arthritis Drugs Reduce Death Rates Among Sickest COVID-19 Patients   Roche, Sanofi Arthritis Drugs Reduce Death Rates Among Sickest COVID-19 Patients  
Treating critically ill COVID-19 patients with Roche's Actemra or Sanofi's Kevzara arthritis drugs significantly improves survival rates and reduces the amount of time patients need intensive care, study results showed on Thursday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Vitamin C-An Adjunctive Therapy for Respiratory Infection, Sepsis and COVID-19. Nutrients 12(12).
There are limited proven therapies for COVID-19. Vitamin C's antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects make it a potential therapeutic candidate, both for the prevention and amelioration of COVID-19 infection, and as an adjunctive therapy in the critical care of COVID-19. This literature review focuses on vitamin C deficiency in respiratory infections, including COVID-19, and the mechanisms of action in infectious disease, including support of the stress response, its role in preventing and treating colds and pneumonia, and its role in treating sepsis and COVID-19. The evidence to date indicates that oral...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

As Mutated Strains of COVID-19 Surface, Can the U.S. Overcome Its Vaccine Rollout Hurdles?
Twenty million. That was the number of Americans who were supposed to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by now. Instead, more than 5 million people have received a shot, and 17 million doses have been shipped to the states and other jurisdictions that are distributing them to hospitals, doctors and pharmacies. “There is a complete lack of federal leadership, and it’s just horrifying,” says Dr. Tom Frieden, a former director of the CDC. “We heard, ‘It’s our job as Operation Warp Speed to deliver vaccines to states. Then it’s their job from there.’ But that’s not how public ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Fears Covid vaccines would not work against South Africa variant led to travel curbs
Minister says extra check on travellers introduced as ‘we simply cannot take chances’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageFears that Covid vaccines will not work against the new South African strain of the virus have prompted the introduction of testing for new arrivals into England and Scotland from abroad, the transport secretary, Grant Shapps, has said.Outlining the new testing regime for England and Scotland, he told Sky News: “This is an extra check and we’re doing this now because there are these variants that we’re very keen to keep out of the country, like ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Weaver Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Grant Shapps Health Politics Society UK news Source Type: news

HIV vs. AIDS
Title: HIV vs. AIDSCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 5/31/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/8/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet HIV General)
Source: MedicineNet HIV General - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New findings help explain how COVID-19 overpowers the immune system
(University of Southern California) Seeking to understand why COVID-19 is able to suppress the body's immune response, new research from the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology suggests that mitochondria are one of the first lines of defense against COVID-19 and identifies key differences in how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, interacts with mitochondrial genes when compared to other viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Lancet: Most patients hospitalised with COVID-19 have at least one symptom six months after falling ill, Wuhan follow-up study suggests
(The Lancet) More than three quarters of COVID-19 patients have at least one ongoing symptom six months after initially becoming unwell, according to research published in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Large study finds higher burden of acute brain dysfunction for COVID-19 ICU patients
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care in the early months of the pandemic were subject to a significantly higher burden of delirium and coma than is typically found in patients with acute respiratory failure. Choice of sedative medications and curbs on family visitation played a role in increasing acute brain dysfunction for these patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Measuring racial inequities in COVID-19 testing
This study   adapted a well-established tool for measuring inequity from economics--the Lorenz curve--to measure racial inequities in COVID-19 testing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cardiac MRI shows lower degrees of myocarditis in athletes recovered from COVID-19
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's medical journal Circulation a group of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) dispute the most recent findings of the incidence of myocarditis in athletes with a history of COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Single-dose COVID-19 vaccine triggers antibody response in mice
(American Chemical Society) Across the world, health care workers and high-risk groups are beginning to receive COVID-19 vaccines, offering hope for a return to normalcy amidst the pandemic. However, the vaccines authorized for emergency use in the U.S. require two doses to be effective, which can create problems with logistics and compliance. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that elicits a virus-neutralizing antibody response in mice after only a single dose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19
(Stanford University) Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Unravelling the mystery that makes viruses infectious
(University of Leeds) Researchers have for the first time identified the way viruses like the poliovirus and the common cold virus 'package up' their genetic code, allowing them to infect cells. The findings, published today (Friday, 8 January) in the journal PLOS Pathogens by a team from the Universities of Leeds and York, open up the possibility that drugs or anti-viral agents can be developed that would stop such infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

ID Care Physicians Preach Hope and Excitement After Receiving First...
ID Care, the largest network of infectious disease specialists on the East Coast, is taking part in the first round of COVID-19 vaccines, marking a huge moment for the state of New Jersey.(PRWeb January 08, 2021)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/id_care_physicians_preach_hope_and_excitement_after_receiving_first_doses_of_covid_19_vaccine/prweb17649383.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Over Half of COVID Transmission May Occur via Asymptomatic People Over Half of COVID Transmission May Occur via Asymptomatic People
A modeling study suggests strategic testing of at-risk but apparently healthy individuals could help curb coronavirus spread, but maintaining current mitigation measures is imperative.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Fatigue, Brain Fog Most Common in'Long COVID'Fatigue, Brain Fog Most Common in'Long COVID '
Most people also experienced relapses, which were triggered by stress or exercise, and many were still unable to work at full capacity.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

The COVID-19 Virus Is Mutating. What Does That Mean for Vaccines?
As we enter the second year of living with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus is celebrating its invasion of the world’s population with yet more mutated forms that help it to spread more easily from person to person. One, first detected in the U.K. in December, has already raised alarms about whether the COVID-19 virus is now escaping from the protection that vaccines just being rolled out now might provide. The variant has also been found in the U.S. Already, U.K. officials have tightened lockdowns in England, Scotland and Wales, and over the holidays, more than 40 countries banned travelers from the region ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Moderna CEO: Vaccine Will Likely Work for'a Couple of Years'Moderna CEO: Vaccine Will Likely Work for'a Couple of Years '
"The antibody decay generated by the vaccine in humans goes down very slowly.... We believe there will be protection potentially for a couple of years,"said Stephanie Bancel, Moderna's CEO.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Pulmonary Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pulmonary Medicine Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Loss of Smell Reported in 86% of Mild COVID Cases Loss of Smell Reported in 86% of Mild COVID Cases
A European study found patients with mild cases of COVID-19 were much more likely to report losing their sense of smell than patients with moderate to critical cases.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Surge in Arizona, World'Hot Spot,' Puts Focus on Governor Surge in Arizona, World'Hot Spot,' Puts Focus on Governor
Their goal in my opinion is to vaccinate their way out of this," said Will Humble."Eventually it will work. There's just going to be a lot of dead people in the meantime."Associated Press (Source: Medscape Pulmonary Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pulmonary Medicine Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

In Los Angeles and Beyond, Oxygen Is the Latest Covid Bottleneck In Los Angeles and Beyond, Oxygen Is the Latest Covid Bottleneck
In some hospitals that pipe oxygen to patients'rooms, the massive volume of cold liquid oxygen is freezing the equipment needed to deliver it, which can block the system.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

COVID Likely the Third-Leading Cause of Death in US, CDC Says COVID Likely the Third-Leading Cause of Death in US, CDC Says
The United States had recorded 357,258 coronavirus related deaths on Wednesday, according to Johns Hopkins University.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Pulmonary Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pulmonary Medicine Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Sinovac Vaccine Shows 78% Efficacy in Brazilian Trial, Details Sparse Sinovac Vaccine Shows 78% Efficacy in Brazilian Trial, Details Sparse
A COVID-19 vaccine developed by China's Sinovac Biotech was 78% effective in a late-stage Brazilian trial and entirely prevented severe cases, a source said on Thursday, boosting Chinese efforts to catch up with Western vaccine makers.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Sinovac's COVID-19 Vaccine 78% Effective in Late-Stage Trial in Brazil: Source Sinovac's COVID-19 Vaccine 78% Effective in Late-Stage Trial in Brazil: Source
A COVID-19 vaccine developed by China's Sinovac Biotech was 78% effective in a late-stage Brazilian trial and entirely prevented severe cases, a source said on Thursday, boosting Chinese efforts to catch up with Western vaccine makers.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Arthritis drugs could help save lives of Covid patients, research finds
Results suggest tocilizumab and sarilumab could cut relative risk of death of those in intensive care by 24%Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageTwo drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis could help to save the lives of one in 12 intensive care patients with severe Covid, researchers have found.The NHS will begin using tocilizumab to treat coronavirus patients from Friday, health officials said after results from about 800 patients confirmed the drug brings benefits, potentially cutting the relative risk of death by 24%.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus UK news Medical research Infectious diseases Source Type: news

No Increase Seen in Children's Share of COVID-19 Burden No Increase Seen in Children's Share of COVID-19 Burden
Children's share of the cumulative COVID-19 burden remained at 12.4% for a second consecutive week.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Governors Scramble to Speed Vaccine Effort After Slow Start Governors Scramble to Speed Vaccine Effort After Slow Start
With frustration rising over the sluggish rollout of the vaccine, state leaders and other politicians around the U.S. are turning up the pressure, improvising and seeking to bend the rules.Associated Press (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

COVIDLAND: A Film About Survival and Hope in the ICU COVIDLAND: A Film About Survival and Hope in the ICU
"The people that survive this keep giving me hope." A critical care physician allows a filmmaker to shadow her in the COVID ward of the ICU. Watch now.Medscape Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Commentary Source Type: news

Canadian Care Home Residents Challenge Delay of Second COVID-19 Vaccine Shot Canadian Care Home Residents Challenge Delay of Second COVID-19 Vaccine Shot
Residents of a Canadian long-term care home who received some of the first COVID-19 vaccine shots administered in the country have threatened to seek a court injunction if they do not get the second recommended shot in the coming days.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Red Tape Slows Vaccine Rollout in French Nursing Homes, Frustrating Medics Red Tape Slows Vaccine Rollout in French Nursing Homes, Frustrating Medics
Worried about wasting shots and public resistance in a country where scepticism of vaccines is common, France introduced a series of bureaucratic hurdles that must be cleared before rolling out COVID-19 inoculations in nursing homes.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Pizza-Sized Boxes and Paying a Premium: Israel's COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Pizza-Sized Boxes and Paying a Premium: Israel's COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout
Order early, pay a lot, digitise distribution and stretch the supply.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news