Coronavirus and Regulation
Thomas A. Firey andPeter Van DorenCrises often illuminate “inefficient” public policies—ones with costs that outweigh their benefits. Society can tolerate (and may not even notice) them in ordinary times, allowing the policies to continue and protect and enrich special interests. But in crises, their costs become less tolerable.Because of the coronavirus, the U.S. economy is experiencing simultaneous negative shocks todemand andsupply. The demand shock is broadly understood: “social distancing” is causing people to avoid (and governments to close or curtail) mass transit, restaurants, personal...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 20, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas A. Firey, Peter Van Doren Source Type: blogs

Meaningful Results from Meditation Research
What do we really know about meditation, other than the fact that the practice is touted for its apparent ability to help relaxation, ease stress, and quiet the mind? While the Western world has gravitated toward various forms of meditation in recent years, researchers haven’t quite caught up with studies to prove why and how meditation provides these benefits, along with others. Some researchers are working to change that, as evidenced by some of their newly published results. Meditation Can Help You Make Fewer Mistakes Michigan State University researchers studied how a single, 20-minute session of guided meditatio...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Mindfulness Research Meditation Source Type: blogs

The Untold Reality of Medical Device Shortages in the U.S.
Chaun Powell Soumi Shah By CHAUN POWELL, MBA and SOUMI SAHA, PharmD, JD Say the word “shortage” to a healthcare professional and chances are the first thing that will come to mind is drug shortages. With good reason, too – there are more than 100 drugs currently at risk or not readily available for U.S. hospitals, according to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) drug shortage list.  Shortages don’t just apply to drugs, however, and as 2019 has shown, healthcare providers must become more focused on shortages of the medical device variety. The shutdown of multiple medical ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Chaun Powell Drug shortages FDA medical device shortages Premier Soumi Saha Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 28th 2019
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

What Happened When I Continued Methadone Treatment While Pregnant
The last time I stuck a needle in my arm was three whole months before I conceived my son, and I’m grateful that he’s never experienced me in active addiction. I say three whole months as if it were a lifetime, but it really is to anyone in early recovery. I was fortunate, I stopped using heroin before I found out that I was pregnant. I had just turned 29 and was in a stable relationship with my now-husband. For many women, getting on methadone doesn’t happen until they find out they’re pregnant. Their options are to either keep using or get into treatment. I started taking methadone five months be...
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Addiction Pregnancy Publishers Recovery The Fix Heroin Methadone methadone withdrawal Opioids Pregnant Source Type: blogs

Hong Kong Protests and the Political Effects of an “Exit” Option
Alex NowrastehSparked by a Chinese extradition bill that would have made it possible for people in Hong Kong to be tried in the mainland ’s justice system, protesters in Hong Kong have demonstrated against Beijing for100 days as of this week. Since starting, the protests have grown to include a broader critique of the Chinese communist government ’s policies in Hong Kong. In anticipation of a potential government crackdown, no doubt influenced by fear of a repeat of themassacre at Tiananmen Square 30 years ago, the option for protesters and their families to leave seems increasingly important.One of the potenti...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 17, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Employee Retention: Employee Rewards Part 2
Employee retention is a hot topic for HR professionals.  Is your employee rewards program designed to retain and attract the best talent? My research on job stress and purpose-driven corporate culture revealed the second secret to great employee rewards: Purpose-driven organizations solve problems so people can perform at their highest potential. Thom Singer wrote a great article about cultivating potential to support employee retention.  I agree mentorship and training are essential.  I also agree that work-life balance strategies aren’t the answer. Employee retention depends on solving problems. Empl...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - June 24, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Eliz Greene Tags: Leadership Productivity Purpose-driven Corporate Culture employee engagement employee retention employee rewards Source Type: blogs

Ban the Box and Statistical Discrimination
With 25 percent of the world ’s prison population, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate of any country in the world. Over 600,000 people are released from American prisons each year and, sadly, about two-thirds of them will be rearrested within three years. Creating opportunities for people released from prison to rein tegrate into society has rightly become a key focus of criminal justice reformers.In recent years, “Ban The Box” policies and legislation, which require companies to delay asking whether job applicants have a criminal record until later in the hiring process, have become a popular po...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 4, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Peter Van Doren Source Type: blogs

Are Child-Care Subsidies Actually “Good For The Economy”?
Commentators are already implying Democrat Elizabeth Warren ’s new universal child-care plan will be “good for the economy.”Moody ’s Analytics reckons subsidies will induce more mothers into the labor market, raising growth rates by 0.08 percent per year over a decade. Others say that cheaper out-of-pocket child-care will reduce time spent out of the labor force by working mothers, and this greater maternal labor market atta chment will boost recorded productivity and women’s earning potential. Combined, it is said the universal program will raise the economy’s productive capacity a...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 21, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 10th 2018
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 9, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Current State of Therapeutic Development Involving Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
A little more than a decade has passed since the development of a simple cell reprogramming approach that reliably created pluripotent stem cells from ordinary somatic cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells. These stem cells are very similar, near identical in fact, to the embryonic stem cells that were previously the only reliable source of cells capable of forming any cell type in the body. Arguably the most important aspect of induced pluripotency is not the promise of the ability to generate patient-matched cells for regenerative therapies and tissue engineering of replacement organs, but rather that it is a lo...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Inducing labor at full term: What makes sense?
For generations, midwives and doctors have looked for ways to imitate human physiology and nudge women’s bodies into giving birth. Synthetic hormones can be used to start and speed up labor. Soft balloons and seaweed sticks placed alongside the cervix can shape a pathway through the birth canal. Self-stimulation can spontaneously spark natural labor transmitters. But the start of labor remains a complex and mysterious process. And part of this mystery is figuring out which women to induce, when to induce labor, and how. Now, a landmark study known as ARRIVE has brought a bit of clarity. What does the study tell us ab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Toni Golen, MD Tags: Children's Health Family Planning and Pregnancy Health trends Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Against A Highly Regressive “Meat Tax”
Some economists want to make it more expensive for the less well-off to enjoy aclear revealed pleasure: eating red and processed meat.The  average household in the poorest fifth of the income distribution dedicates 1.3 percent of spending towards it. That’s over double average household spending in the richest quintile. Yet meat is now a new “public health” target. Once, lifestyle controls stopped at smoking and drinking. They recently expanded to soda and even caffeine. Now, even the hallowe d steak is not sacred.Last week,  a report by University of Oxford academics calculated suppos...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 12, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 12th 2018
This study's researchers approached all people turning 85 in 2006 in two cities in the UK for participation. At the beginning of the study in 2006-2007, there were 722 participants, 60 percent of whom were women. The participants provided researchers with information about what they ate every day, their body weight and height measurements, their overall health assessment (including any level of disability), and their medical records. The researchers learned that more than one-quarter (28 percent) of very old adults had protein intakes below the recommended dietary allowance. The researchers noted that older adults w...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 19th September 2018
Some recent things you might need to know about.Professional Records Standards BodyStandard for maternity care records to support the introduction of digital maternity records in England.ResearchNIHR SignalsInducing labour at or after 41 weeks reduces risks to infantsAppraisal of Cochrane Review looking at induction of labour for women at or beyond termNHS England case studiesHertfordshire perinatal mental healthcommunity servicesNICE consultationsNeonatal infection (early onset): antibiotics for prevention and treatment: Draft scope consultation.  Closing date for comments: 12 October 2018.Intrapartum care for wome...
Source: Browsing - September 19, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 10th 2018
In conclusion, HSC ageing is characterised by reduced self-renewal, myeloid and platelet HSC skewing, and expanded clonal haematopoiesis that is considered a preleukaemic state. The underlying molecular mechanisms seem to be related to increased oxidative stress due to ROS accumulation and DNA damage, which are influenced by both cell- and cell non-autonomous mechanisms such as prolonged exposure to infections, inflammageing, immunosenescence, and age-related changes in the HSC niche. Thus, HSC ageing seems to be multifactorial and we are only beginning to connect all the dots. The Price of Progress or the Waste...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 9, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 16th August 2018
A day late, but some recent things you might need to know about.  Genetic testingGenetics Home Reference: What is noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and what disorders can it screen for?  (American website, so check that what is discussed applies here).ResearchLabor Induction versus Expectant Management in Low-RiskNulliparous Women (NEJM)Intravenous remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia versusintramuscular pethidine for pain relief in labour (RESPITE): an open-label,multicentre, randomised controlled trial (Lancet)Reported in theGuardian and theBMJ.In the news (all in the Guardian)Postnat...
Source: Browsing - August 16, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Study finds clear –yet surprisingly different–benefits in 3 types of meditation-based mental training
___ As citizens of the 21st century, we face many problems that come with an industrialized and globalized world. I’m not a lawyer or a politician, but a psychologist and neuroscientist. So research on how to train helpful mental and social capacities is my way to contribute to a more healthy, communal, and cooperative civilization. For the past five years, that research has taken the form of the ReSource Project, one of the longest and most comprehensive studies on the effects of meditation-based mental training to date. Lots of research treats the concept of meditation as a single practice, when in fact medita...
Source: SharpBrains - July 11, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness affective attention behavior brain cognitive-abilities compassion higher-level meditation meditation-based mental-training mindfulness Psychology ReSource Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 11th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The 14 Most Common Arguments against Immigration and Why They're Wrong
This report finds more problems with immigrant assimilation in Europe, especially for those from outside of the European Union, but the findings for the United States are quite positive.The third work, by University of Washington economist Jacob Vigdor, compares modern immigrant civic and cultural assimilation to that of immigrants from the early 20th century (an earlier draft of his book chapter ishere, the published version is available in thiscollection).   If you think early 20th century immigrants and their descendants eventually assimilated successfully, Vigdor’s conclusion is reassuring:While there are re...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 2, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Promising Long Term Results in Stem Cell Therapy for Peripheral Artery Disease
Five years ago, a small group of patients who had exhausted other treatment options for their peripheral artery disease were treated with stem cells. Researchers have followed the patients since then, and here report on the long term results - they are promising. This is also the case for a range of other comparatively simple stem cell transplant therapies, now that the research and medical communities have had years to practice and refine the methodologies involved. A long-term study of patients who received stem cells to treat angiitis-induced critical limb ischemia (AICLI) shows the cells to be both safe and ef...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Curb Your Enthusiasm
KIP SULLIVAN Lawton Burns and Mark Pauly, economists at the Wharton School, just published an article that should be required reading for all policy makers and health services researchers. The article,  entitled “Transformation of the health care industry: Curb your enthusiasm,” appears in the latest edition of the Milbank Quarterly. Burns and Pauly undertook an enormous task and executed it well. They first sought to explain the assumptions underlying Managed Care (MC) 2.0 – the proposals promoted by the managed care movement in the wake of the HMO backlash of the late 1990s. Then they evaluat...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Robotics, A.I. and Blockchain Redesign The Pharma Supply Chain
Exoskeletons will aid pharma factory workers. 3D printing will allow pharmacies to produce drugs on the spot. Blockchain technologies will help fight counterfeit drugs. These are just bits and pieces, but the entire process of the pharmaceutical supply chain will be affected by disruptive technologies. Let me show you a comprehensive overview how innovations will make it more efficient, faster and cheaper than ever before. Exoskeletons will aid pharma factory workers. 3D printing will allow pharmacies to produce drugs on the spot. Blockchain technologies will help fight counterfeit drugs. These are just bits and pieces, b...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 13, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Pharma Security & Privacy AI blockchain digital Innovation Personalized medicine pharmaceutics pharmacies robotics robots supply chain Source Type: blogs

Inducing labor: A way to avoid a cesarean?
This study was not designed to create a far-reaching strategy or method to reduce the already-way-too-high cesarean delivery rate in this country. It was designed to make sure we weren’t causing harm to babies by inducing labor at 39 weeks. So, the ARRIVE trial has given us something to think about The results were announced for the very first time at a recent meeting of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine and will be published soon in a peer-reviewed journal. The process of peer review, during which the methods, results, and limitations of the study are evaluated by experts, is going to help us to focus on the m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Toni Golen, MD Tags: Children's Health Family Planning and Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Providing Care at 10,000 Feet
Going on a medical mission with the Himalayan Health Exchange to the Himachal Pradesh region of India allowed me to see a part of the world that I had never experienced before. The patient population that we were seeing had very little access, if any, to medical care throughout the year. We had to travel on foot to their villages to provide care because of their remote location. But the trip was quite unforgettable—we spent all our off days hiking through the Himalayas, had night-time views of the Milky Way, and ate more Indian food than we could have ever imagined.The flight from Delhi to Leh was incredible. We coul...
Source: Going Global - February 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

More Information Won ’t Resolve Management Problems at Border Patrol Checkpoints
ConclusionThe best information in the world cannot compensate for poor incentives and can make government management less efficient by providing cover for any choice. Government agents are not usually malevolent,or at least any more so than the rest of us, but they have incentives to satisfy political demands. Private firms that behave in these ways often fail or earn lower profits unless they are bailed out by the government, which is usually the source of these poor incentives in the first place. More metrics can even worsen efficiency. We should look to deeper structural reforms of government agencies rather than contin...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 6, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Here ’s why women doctors need time together
The 2nd Annual Women in Anesthesiology Conference is taking place in October. Developing this organization has been a labor of, if not love, then honoring. We are honoring a value system that works to gives women the respect, autonomy, and power they deserve. There is an amazing power in gathering, shared experiences and decreasing isolation. Nobody has identical life experiences. But part of what informs our identity is shared experiences. As anesthesiologists, we did not all do the same residencies. But we all know what it is like to discuss a surprise difficult airway, an ejection fraction of 15 percent in a demented pa...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rekha-chandrabose" rel="tag" > Rekha Chandrabose, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

bend and ear and listen to my version / of a really solid Tennessee excursion
Ever since I moved to Atlanta (good God,nine years ago), people have been expressing, or at leastfeigning utter surprise, that I have never been to Chattanooga. " YOU'VE NEVER BEEN? " everyone always says, aghast, like I'm some kind of Abnormal, even though, GUESS WHAT, there are lots of places I haven't yet been, and Chattanooga hasn't really exactly numbered on my " must see before I die " list of travel destinations. But I wasn't opposed to the notion of visiting Chattanooga either (truth is I simply knew nothing about it apart from the Glenn Miller song), and so when we had a Labor Day weekend with ...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 3, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

The RAISE Act Would Hurt U.S. Taxpayers
ConclusionThe RAISE Act will increase the deficit relative to current immigration policy when updated CPS data on new arrivals are applied to the findings of the National Academy of Sciences.   A doubling of skilled immigrants, even if it is accompanied by a modest 25 percent increase in the flow of lower-skilled immigrants, almost doubles the fiscal benefit.  Small cuts in benefits received by immigrants increase the fiscal benefits by large amounts.  The federal government faces a severe budget crunch in the near future due to the cash shortfalls in Social Security and Medicare.   Immigration hasincre...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 25, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 14th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 13, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Statement for Hearing on “Agricultural Guestworkers: Meeting the Growing Needs of American Agriculture”
PDFhereStatement for the Recordof David Bier of the Cato Institute[1]Submitted to Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security,House Committee on the Judiciary  Hearing on“Agricultural Guestworkers: Meeting the Growing Needs of American Agriculture”July 18, 2017Foreign agricultural workers allow farms to expand production, lower prices, and raise incomes for most workers in the United States. Government intervention in the labor market inhibits the ability of farmers to plan the planting and harvesting of crops appropriately, leading to a reduction in production at the start of the season or crops rotti...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 19, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 26th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 25, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

As US Attorney, Labor Secretary Nominee Enabled Drug and Biotechnology Executives' Impunity
The new Trump administration nominee for US Secretary of Labor is a former US Attorney for the southern district of Florida.  In that role, he seemed to uphold the ideas that certain big corporations, particularly big pharmaceutical and biotechnology corporations, are too big to jail, and that top executives of big corporations should not be held accountable for their corporations'actions.He had central involvement in three bigsettlements of charges of corporate misbehavior which held no individuals accountable for enabling, authorizing, directing or implementing the bad behavior.  The settlements imposed only mo...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 21, 2017 Category: Health Management Tags: bribery Bristol-Myers-Squibb deception Donald Trump Genzyme GlaxoSmithKline impunity kickbacks legal settlements manipulating clinical research Sanofi-Aventis Source Type: blogs

Labor Induction and Augmentation; A Possible Link to Austism
Many women in this modern world of medicine have an induced labor and augmentation, which means that they are given pitocin to stimulate contraction and deliver the baby faster, however, researchers in North Carolina have found a link with Autism.Contributor: Rodney Samaan, MD, MPHPublished: Sep 19, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - September 20, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs