I Can’t Hear You!
​A 50-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of ringing in his ears and difficulty understanding what people were saying. He was concerned that he was having a stroke. A full neurological exam was unremarkable aside from decreased hearing, but his hearing deficits appeared to be equal bilaterally. Otoscopic exam demonstrated a normal tympanic membrane, and the rest of his physical exam was unremarkable. The patient's past medical history was significant for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, for which he took lisinopril and atorvastatin. He was recently treated with a 10-day course of doxycycl...
Source: The Tox Cave - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

NSAIDs: How dangerous are they for your heart?
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are one of the most common medications used to treat pain and inflammation. Ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin, and other NSAIDs are effective across a variety of common conditions, from acute musculoskeletal pain to chronic arthritis. They work by blocking specific proteins, called COX enzymes. This results in the reduction of prostaglandins, which play a key role in pain and inflammation. There are two types of NSAIDs: nonselective NSAIDs and COX-2 selective NSAIDs (these are sometimes referred to as “coxibs”). There has been a growing body ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christian Ruff, MD, MPH Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Cardiology MCQ Test
Please wait while the activity loads. If this activity does not load, try refreshing your browser. Also, this page requires javascript. Please visit using a browser with javascript enabled. If loading fails, click here to try again Click on the 'Start' button to begin the test. After answering all questions, click on the 'Get Results' button to display your score and the explanations. There is no time limit for this test. Start Congratulations - you have completed Cardiology MCQ Test. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%% Your answers a...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 16, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology MCQ Source Type: blogs

Is it safe to take ibuprofen for the aches and pains of exercise?
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Not long ago, I took ibuprofen after a dental procedure and was amazed at how well it worked. Millions of people have had similar experiences with ibuprofen and related medications (called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs) when used for a number of conditions, including arthritis, back pain, and headache. That’s why NSAIDs are among the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide. More than a dozen different NSAIDs are available, including naproxen (as in Naprosyn or Aleve), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Voltaren) and indomethacin (Indocin). Aspirin is also an NSAID...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Exercise and Fitness Health Kidney and urinary tract Source Type: blogs

Drug for PDA closure in newborn – Cardiology MCQ
Which of the following is not meant for closure of patent ductus arteriosus in a newborn baby? a) Paracetamol b) Prostaglandin E1 c) Ibuprofen d) Indomethacin Correct answer: b) Prostaglandin E1 Prostaglandin E1 is used for maintaining ductal patency in ductus dependent circulations [1]. Both oral [2] and intravenous paracetamol [3] have been used for pharmacological closure of patent ductus arteriosus in new borns. Indomethacin was the earlier drug being used for pharmacological ductal closure, but seldom used now because of its adverse effect. Then came ibuprofen, which is still being used. Paracetamol is the lates...
Source: Cardiophile MD - November 22, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

What Do We Know About Medical Errors Associated With Electronic Medical Records?
By ROSS KOPPEL Recently, the Journal of Patient Safety published a powerful and important article on the role of EHRs in patient harm, errors and malpractice claims. The article is open access. Electronic Health Record–Related Events in Medical Malpractice Claims by Mark L. Graber, Dana Siegal, Heather Riah, Doug Johnston, and Kathy Kenyon.  

The article is remarkable for several reasons: Considerably over 80% of the reported errors involve horrific patient harm: many deaths, strokes, missed and significantly delayed cancer diagnoses, massive hemorrhage, 10-fold overdoses, ignored or los...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 64-year-old man with knee osteoarthritis
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 64-year-old man is evaluated for a 2-year history of knee osteoarthritis. He has bilateral knee pain that worsens with walking. He has tried topical therapies, physical therapy, and acetaminophen, none of which has provided relief. The patient also has peripheral vascular disease, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Medications are hydrochlorothiazide, pravastatin, and a daily aspirin. On physical examination, temperature is 37.0 °C (98.6 °F), blood pressure is 116/76 mm Hg, pulse rate is 60/min,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 12, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 094
Welcome to the awesome 94th edition! The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beaut of the Week StEmylns Top spot this week has been smashed by two great post from the StEmylns team! First up we h...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Health Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs