Quick test for Ebola

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Using a simple paper strip similar to a pregnancy test, MIT researchers have found a way to rapidly diagnose Ebola, as well as other viral hemorrhagic fevers such as yellow fever and dengue fever.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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More than 1,500 deaths and 2,500 people sickened – that’s the recent account of the ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) raging in the country since last August, and recently declared a public health emergency of international concern. Experts say efforts to contain the virus are hindered by biological, public health, political, and cultural issues, but we looked around what digital health technologies could do to mitigate the spread and the devastation of the infectious disease. The Spaghetti-like virus… The lethal Ebola virus first appeared in 1976 around a river in Congo &nda...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Africa AI artificial intelligence Congo digital digital health digital maps disease disease outbreak ebola epidemic Innovation technology Source Type: blogs
In this study, we evaluated ATA as a potential antiviral drug against ZIKV replication. The antiviral activity of ATA against ZIKV replication in vitro showed median inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 13.87 ± 1.09 μM and 33.33 ± 1.13 μM in Vero and A549 cells, respectively; without showing any cytotoxic effect in both cell lines (median cytotoxic concentration (CC50)> 1,000 μM). Moreover, ATA protected both cell types from ZIKV-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) and apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In addition, pre-treatment of Vero cells with ATA for up to 72 h also resulted...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
There are striking differences in the general social, economic or political background of the developed and developing country-groups, and developing countries are in dire need for creative and innovative medical solutions. Here are the 10 most innovative health technologies which could save millions of lives in these corners of the Earth. Imagine two babies being born at the exact same time: a little girl in Sweden and a baby boy in Mozambique. What are their chances for a long, healthy life? In the Scandinavian country of the easily assemblable IKEA furniture and the most secure car in the world, life expectancy in 2015...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Bioethics Healthcare Design Longevity Africa future GC1 India Innovation Personalized medicine technology Source Type: blogs
This study was determined to be exempt by the University of Pittsburgh Institutional Review Board (IRB # PRO15060289). Results Between July 20, 2015 and November 1, 2015, 89 households in a Key West neighborhood (22%) responded to our survey. One insufficiently complete response was excluded. Demographic characteristic of 88 respondents included in our analysis are reported in Table 1. Table 1: Demographic Data Question Responses Gender (n=87, 99%) Male (n=40, 46%); Female (n=47, 54%) Age (n=88, 100%) 18-33 (n=4, 5%); 34-48 (n=13, 15%); 49-64 (n=38, 43%); 65-79 (n=30, 34%); 80 ...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), during the WHO Executive Board's special session on the Ebola emergency. Credit: UN Photo/Violaine Martin.By Lyndal RowlandsUNITED NATIONS, May 24 2016 (IPS)Putting economic interests over public health is leading the world towards three slow-motion health disasters, Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization’s warned the world’s health ministers on Monday.Changes in the world’s climate, the failure of more and more antibiotic drugs and the increase in so-called lifestyle diseases caused by poor diet and exercise...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: Aid Climate Change Development & Aid Energy Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Governance Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Source Type: news
Associated with grave birth defects, the Zika virus tearing across Latin America could eventually affect more than half of the world's population. That's according to the London School of Hygiene &Tropical Medicine which agreed to an interview via email. Although the current epidemic in the Americas is being spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, according to Jimmy Whitworth, the School's Professor of International Public Health: "A number of mosquitos have been documented to carry the Zika virus. For example, the Aedes albopictus mosquito which resides in large parts of the U.S., southern Europe, and Asia is of...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
U.S. states and cities need to adopt a different mosquito-fighting strategy to battle the species carrying the Zika virus as an outbreak that started in Brazil heads north with warmer weather in the coming weeks, health officials said on Friday. The World Health Organization declared a global health emergency in February as the virus spread rapidly in the Americas, citing Zika's link to the birth defect microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome, an autoimmune disorder in adults that can cause paralysis. The mosquito species responsible for spreading the virus by biting people lives in and around homes, making traditional ev...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Mostly innocuous and fairly unknown until a few weeks ago, the Zika virus is suddenly dominating the news. Under scrutiny is the virus's putative link with a congenital birth defect called microcephaly, which causes babies to be born with abnormally small heads and undeveloped brains. Two recent publications [1,2] have documented finding the genome of the Zika virus in the amniotic fluid and brains of fetuses affected by microcephaly from three different mothers. These numbers are still too small to constitute a proof, and in fact, alternative theories are already cropping up: an organization of Argentinean doctors has pu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Follow me at @JohnRossMD Last week, the government of El Salvador gave what might be the strangest public health advice of all time: don’t get pregnant for the next two years. Officials in Colombia, Ecuador, and Jamaica have also warned women to avoid pregnancy, although only for the next several months. The reason for these unusual recommendations? An outbreak of Zika virus, currently raging in 21 countries in the Americas and the Caribbean, as well as the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Samoa, and Cape Verde. Until recently, Zika was an obscure virus, confined to equatorial Africa and Asia, an...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Family Planning and Pregnancy Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: news
Silver nanoparticles on paper reveal three diseases with the speed and simplicity of a home pregnancy test -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Source: Scientific American - Official RSS Feed - Category: Science Tags: More Science Biology Chemistry Health Source Type: research
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