Leslie T.

I was at a crossroads in my health situation. At 55 years old, I was still able to perform my daily tasks, including caregiving for a head injured foster son who is large. At night though, I could not sleep due to acid reflux, night sweats, anxiety, joint pain, and just general discomfort. I was cranky and angry because of my insulin resistance. My mood swings had my family in discord. In 1989, I had a surgery on an artery in my leg. Doctors told me then that I had an autoimmune disease that affected my tissues. This disease would sometimes flare up and cause extreme bruising. I was foggy minded and my nose ran all the time. I knew that I had to do something about my weight and my health (I weighed between 210 and 220). Even though I was physically strong, I felt sick and weak a lot of the time. In February of 2014, I was awake again late at night. I saw the show called “Brain Change” featuring Dr. David Perlmutter on PBS. Since I have a brain injured foster son, I was interested in any show about brains. As I watched the show, I realized that the subject matter was more relevant to me and to my situation. The longer I watched Dr. Perlmutter, the more excited I got. Finally, I understood the connection between the glycemic index and my inability to keep weight off. I could see that what my diet was missing was essential fats and healthy balance. According to Dr. Perlmutter, I could eat an abundant amount of the right foods, and still lose weight and...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - Category: Neurologists Authors: Tags: Success Fatigue weight loss Source Type: blogs

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AbstractPurposeImpaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is associated with poor health outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to determine health utilities in patients with COPD and to identify the variables with the greatest impact.MethodsThis is a pooled analysis of data from 4 observational studies performed in stable COPD patients. Evaluation of patient HRQoL utilities was performed using the Spanish version of the self-administered EuroQoL 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. EQ-5D utilities were described and compared according to several markers of disease severity....
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
PURPOSE: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with a 2- to 7-fold risk of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment may reduce MVA risk. We further explored this issue in long-term CPAP users and untr...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news
INTRODUCTION: Despite the clear need for understanding how pilot sleep affects performance during long-range (LR; 12-16h) and ultra-long-range (ULR; 16+h) flights, the scientific literature on the effects of sleep loss and circadian desynchronizatio...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: Airline crew are being exposed to extended workdays and compressed work periods, with quick returns between duties, implying a heightened physiological and psychological strain that may lead to sleep deprivation and fatigue. The aim of t...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news
If you want to be a doctor, hold off on medical school until age 28 - STAT There are advantages to spending your formative years working at a first career and meeting your life partner, and then starting medical school at age 28. www.statnews.com "Every generation of physicians must be free to act for itself. Claims to a physician’s 20s have withered away. Corporate health care has deemed physicians replaceable, either by those who accept lower pay or by... STAT: Why Medical School Should Start at 28...
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: Surgery (Oxford)Author(s): Tristan E. McMillan, Timothy Gardner, Alan J. JohnstoneAbstractTourniquets have been around for many years, providing surgeons with a bloodless operative field and saving lives in the pre-hospital care of major limb trauma. However, their use does come with risk. It is therefore extremely important that we, as surgeons, fully understand the physiological influence they impose on patients, the complications associated with their use and, moreover, how to minimize the incidence of these complications. Most tourniquets are now electronically...
Source: Surgery (Oxford) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractBakker et al found a change in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 29 of 188 patients, when the examination was repeated at three months and at one year (1). The patients were all being investigated on account of back pain, with presumably varying degrees of concern about the possibility of inflammatory spondyloarthritis.Twelve (6.8%) patients were negative at the initial examination but became positive on subsequent testing. A percentage that was lower, but not dissimilar to Van Onna et al's report of 15% at two years (2).
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: LETTER TO THE EDITOR Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: NeuroImage: ClinicalAuthor(s): Stefan Frässle, Andre F. Marquand, Lianne Schmaal, Richard Dinga, Dick J. Veltman, Nic J.A. van der Wee, Marie-José van Tol, Dario Schöbi, Brenda W.J.H. Penninx, Klaas E. StephanABSTRACTPatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) show heterogeneous treatment response and highly variable clinical trajectories: while some patients experience swift recovery, others show relapsing-remitting or chronic courses. Predicting individual clinical trajectories at an early stage is a key challenge for psychiatry and might facil...
Source: NeuroImage: Clinical - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
UCLA researchers have found that it is possible to assess a person ’s ability to feel empathy by studying their brain activity while they are resting rather than while they are engaged in specific tasks.  Traditionally, empathy is assessed through the use of questionnaires and psychological assessments. The findings of this study offer an alternative to people who may have difficulty filling out questionnaires, such as people with severe mental illness or autism, said senior author Dr. Marco Iacoboni, professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.“Assessi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
In this study, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of shorter, simpler regimens of trivalent Ad26.Mos.HIV expressing mosaic HIV-1 Env/Gag/Pol antigens combined with aluminium phosphate-adjuvanted clade C gp140 protein.MethodsWe did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 trial (IPCAVD010/HPX1002) at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA, USA. We included healthy, HIV-uninfected participants (aged 18–50 years) who were considered at low risk for HIV infection and had not received any vaccines in the 14 days before study commencement. We randomly assigned participant...
Source: The Lancet HIV - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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