Stomach bacteria might protect against MS

A study in Australia suggests that women infected with the common stomach bug Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) have a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis Trust - Category: Neurology Source Type: news

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lo FF Abstract Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacterium that infects more than a half of world's population. Although it is mainly related to the development of gastroduodenal diseases, several studies have shown that such infection may also influence the development and severity of various extragastric diseases. According to the current evidence, whereas this bacterium is a risk factor for some of these manifestations, it might play a protective role in other pathological conditions. In that context, when considered the gastrointestinal tract, H. pylori positivity have been related to Inflammatory Bowel Dis...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Abstract The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 is a unique, non-bacterial microorganism classified as a probiotic agent. In this review article, at first, we briefly summarized the mechanisms responsible for its probiotic properties, e.g. adhesion to and elimination of enteropathogenic microorganisms and their toxins; extracellular cleavage of pathogens' virulent factors; trophic and anti-inflammatory effects on the intestinal mucosa. The efficacy of S. boulardii administration was tested in variety of human diseases. We discussed the results of S. boulardii CNCM I-745 use in the treatment or prevention of ...
Source: Current Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Curr Microbiol Source Type: research
This study was aimed to determine the seroprevalence of Hp in MS patients and then investigates pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in MS patients infected with HP and seronegative MS patients. Three hundred eighty-seven patients with MS were included in the study and were adjusted by gender and age to 420 healthy subjects.
Source: Journal of Neuroimmunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
This study was approved by and carried out in accordance with the recommendations of the Bioethical Committee of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland (permit numbers 122.6120.337.2016 and KBET/310/B/2012). All subjects gave written informed consent in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Clinical characteristics of patients included in the study are shown in Supplementary Table 1. The epithelial layer was separated enzymatically by treatment with dispase at 4°C overnight (o/n) and subjected to three rounds of digestion with trypsin (BioWest) for 10 min at 37°C. After centrifugation, the obt...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions In conclusion, articles in this Research Topic made a very significant contribution to our understanding of the role played by environmental factors, dysbiotic conditions, and infections in triggering diseases. Since this is a rapidly expanding area of research, many other factors contributing to the onset of these diseases are not covered here. We are confident, however, that further studies will expand the list as well as bring a better understanding of mechanisms involved in the onset of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. Author Contributions All authors listed have made a substantial, direct and i...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize>50% of the entire human population. Generally, H. pylori infect the human stomach in infancy when parietal cells secreting gastric acids, which reduce the survival of H. pylori, are not well matured. Once acquired, the bacterium persists for life. Thus, H. pylori infection reflects sanitary conditions during childhood.>10 studies performed in various Eastern and Western countries as well as two meta-analyses collectively indicated the H. pylori infection rate is significantly lower in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) than in healthy controls.
Source: Journal of Neuroimmunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Abstract Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp-I) is a prevalent disorder identified in the majority of the population in many countries around the world and is responsible for substantial gastrointestinal morbidity. Likewise, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's diseases, multiple sclerosis or glaucoma defined as ocular Alzheimer's disease, are associated with a large public health burden and are among the leading causes of disability. Emerging evidences suggest that Hp-I may be associated with neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, Hp-I could be a predictor of metabolic syndrome (MetS...
Source: Current Molecular Medicine - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Curr Mol Med Source Type: research
During infection, increased lymphatic flow limits edema and prevents tissue dendritic cell retention, while lymphostasis can lead to chronic inflammation. Helicobacter pylori is associated with not only gastritis but also extra‐intestinal diseases, including neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and Alzheimer's disease, while H. pylori and another bad bacterium Clostridium perfringens type A have been proposed to be protective against multiple sclerosis (MS). The above discrepancy on the roles of microbiota can be attributed to several conflicting factors, such as oversimplification, methodology, and taxonomy, which are summarized ...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Neuroimmunology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
For 12 years, UCLA researcher Dennis Slamon pursued a groundbreaking approach to treating breast cancer: Attack the disease genetically.The journey was long and filled with obstacles, but his persistence paid off.Slamon and colleagues conducted laboratory and clinical research that, in collaboration with biotechnology firm Genentech, helped lead to development of the breast cancer drug Herceptin.UCLA's Dennis Slamon with Harry Connick Jr., who played the professor of medicine in a 2008 television movie.The drug, which targets a specific genetic alteration found in about 25 percent of breast cancer patients, has saved thous...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Authors: Salim MA, Eftekharian MM, Taheri M, Yousef Alikhani M Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that disables Central nervous system (CNS) system. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) probably has an important role in the MS pathology. The infection with helicobacter pylori also is recognized as a protective agent against MS in female. METHODS: Serum samples were isolated and frozen at -70°C. The earlier mentioned anti-virus antibodies and antibacterial antibodies were quantified by Elisa kit. RESULTS: The results showed that IgG antibody average value against cytomegaloviru...
Source: Human Antibodies - Category: Biochemistry Tags: Hum Antibodies Source Type: research
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