Study Shows Value of Calcium Scan in Predicting Heart Attack and Stroke Among Those Considered at Either Low or High Risk - 12/23/13

A new study shows that coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening, an assessment tool that is not currently recommended for people considered at low risk, should play a more prominent role in helping determine a person’s risk for heart attack and heart disease-related death, as well as the need for angioplasty or bypass surgery.
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - Category: Research Source Type: news

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A risk-based prevention strategy is the most widely accepted approach to guide clinician-patient decision-making for prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). According to this approach, the intensity of prevention efforts is matched to the estimated risk of the individual. American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines currently recommend pooled cohort equations for initial risk assessment, which integrate age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking status, and treatment for hypertension and diabetes to provide race- and sex-specific estimates of ...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disorder of insulin resistance — a reduced sensitivity to the action of insulin — which leads to high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. Approximately 12% of American adults have T2D, and more than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, a precursor to T2D. This is a major public health concern, as T2D dramatically increases risk for heart disease, including heart attacks, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure. The development and progression of T2D is affected by many factors. Some, such as a person’s race/ethnicity, age, and gender cannot be modified. Others, including...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs
Adding this ingredient to your diet could halve the risk of dying from a heart attack or stroke. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: blogs
Artificial intelligence is making its way into health care, and one of its first stops is making sense of all of those scans that doctors order. Already, studies have shown that AI-based tools can, in some cases, pick out abnormal growths that could be cancerous tumors better than doctors can, mainly because digesting and synthesizing huge volumes of information is what AI does best. In a study published Feb. 14 in Circulation, researchers in the U.K. and the U.S. report that an AI program can reliably predict heart attacks and strokes. Kristopher Knott, a research fellow at the British Heart Foundation, and his team condu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Heart Disease Source Type: news
Authors: Alwi I Abstract Over more than two decades, the concept of atherosclerosis has developed and lead to inflammatory hypothesis. Inflammation plays an important role on pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and coronary heart disease (CHD), including acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although the management of ACS has been demonstrated to be beneficial for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (such as using statin and aspirin) and also seemed to have positive effect on inflammation, the identification of effective management, specifically targeting inflammation, has been not been comprehensively understood....
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
This study investigated whether non-exercise-based estimation of cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) mediates the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and comorbidities in older Korean adults with diabetes. A total of 1371 Korean adults (56% women) aged 60 years and older with diabetes was drawn from those who participated in the 2008–2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys IV and V. Data on comorbidities included hypertension, heart disease (acute myocardial infarction or angina), stroke, arthritis, and chronic renal disease. HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQoL group, whi...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: We provided the premier evidence of positive relationship between urinary BPA concentration and stroke in U.S. POPULATION: Urinary BPA levels were also positively correlated with congestive heart failure, CHD, angina pectoris, MI, as well as total CVD. These associations were more evident in males. Well-coordinated and prospective studies are warranted to gain the human effects of BPA on CVD. PMID: 32058166 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Ecotoxicol Environ Saf Source Type: research
In this study, we assessed the association between Twitter-derived sentiments towards racial/ethnic minorities at state-level and individual-level CVD-related outcomes from the 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Outcomes included hypertension, diabetes, obesity, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), coronary heart disease (CHD), and any CVD from BRFSS 2017 (N = 433,434 to 433,680 across outcomes). A total of 30 million race-related tweets were collected using Twitter Streaming Application Programming Interface (API) from 2015 to 2018. Prevalence of negative and positive sentiment towards r...
Source: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
(University of Western Ontario) The study demonstrated for the first time that in people with no underlying heart disease, after a stroke they were more than 20 times more likely than those who didn't have a stroke (23-fold in women and 25-fold in men) to have a first-in-life major adverse cardiovascular event. These events include things like heart attack, chest pain, cardiac failure or cardiac death.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Aspirin is now only prescribed by NHS doctors to anyone who has had a heart attack or stroke, or to those at high risk because they have heart disease or had previous heart surgery.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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