Influence of adaptive servoventilation therapy on autonomic function and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity in heart failure patients with Cheyne-Stokes respiration compared to healthy volunteers

Adaptive servoventiation therapy (ASV) is designed to treat hypocapnic central sleep apnoea (Cheyne-Stokes respiration) in heart failure (HF) . It remains unclear whether this therapy increases stroke volume (SV) and if, this is mediated by a decrease in cardiac afterload due to increased parasympathetic nervous activity (PNA) or by a change in baroreceptor reflex sensitivity.12 patients with HF (12 male; 70 ± 9 years; NYHA ≥ II; EF ≤ 45% and Cheyne- Stokes respiration) and 14 healthy volunteers (13 male, 24 ± 4 years, EF ≥ 60%, AHI
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: 4.2 Sleep and Control of Breathing Source Type: research

Related Links:

CONCLUSION: Effects of central apneas on SVB during sleep depend on underlying systolic heart failure, with neutral effects in heart failure and increased sympathetic drive in idiopathic central apneas. PMID: 32700287 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
ConclusionEffects of central apneas on SVB during sleep depend on underlying systolic heart failure, with neutral effects in heart failure and increased sympathetic drive in idiopathic central apneas.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by augmented sympathetic nerve activity. In our previous study, patients with OSA and an apnea-hyperpnea index (AHI)>55events/h showed increased single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity compared to patients with OSA and AHI of 30-55events/h. However, the prognostic impact in these patients remains unclear. METHODS: Ninety-one OSA patients were included. All patients who had indication for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) were treated with CPAP. Patients were divided into three groups: mild/moderate OSA (S), AHI55events/h (n=...
Source: Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: J Cardiol Source Type: research
idi E Abstract Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is a growing health concern, affecting nearly one billion people worldwide; it is an independent cardiovascular risk factor, associated with incident obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, arrhythmias, stroke, coronary artery disease and heart failure. Obstructive sleep apnoea-related cardiovascular and metabolic co-morbidities are a major concern for prognosis and the complexity of obstructive sleep apnoea integrated care. Continuous positive airway pressure, the first-line therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea, is highly effective at improving ...
Source: Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Arch Cardiovasc Dis Source Type: research
Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) - a type of periodic breathing characterised by periods of hyperventilation (crescendo-decrescendo pattern) that alternate with central apneas - is highly prevalent in patients with systolic heart failure (HF) [1 –3]. CSR has been hypothesised to further increase sympathetic drive and stroke volume, thus exerting detrimental effects if left untreated [4]. At least, this is what most people thought prior to publication of the SERVE-HF trial in 2015 [5]. This trial enrolled more than 1300 patients with systo lic HF and central sleep apnea who were randomly assigned to adaptive servo-vent...
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Sara AlMarabeh, Mohammed H. Abdulla and Ken D. O'Halloran* Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Renal sensory nerves are important in the regulation of body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, and blood pressure. Activation of renal mechanoreceptor afferents triggers a negative feedback reno-renal reflex that leads to the inhibition of sympathetic nervous outflow. Conversely, activation of renal chemoreceptor afferents elicits reflex sympathoexcitation. Dysregulation of reno-renal reflexes by suppression of the inhibitory refle...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
AbstractEnvironmental noise is a well ‐recognized health risk and part of the external exposome—the World Health Organization estimates that 1 million healthy life years are lost annually in Western Europe alone due to noise‐related complications, including increased incidence of hypertension, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Previous data suggest that noise works through two paired pathways in a proposed reaction model for noise exposure. As a nonspecific stressor, chronic low‐level noise exposure can cause a disruption of sleep and communication leading to annoyance and subsequent sympathetic...
Source: BioFactors - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
If you live near an airport, railroad tracks or a busy road, you might be concerned about how fumes from those planes, trains and automobiles are affecting your health. But according to a new review in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, there may be another threat to worry about: high levels of noise that may be bad for your heart. A connection between noise pollution and cardiovascular disease has been observed in numerous studies over the years, the authors of the new review said. High decibel levels from road traffic and airplanes, for example, has been linked to high blood pressure, coronary artery dise...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized are loud noises unhealthy healthytime Heart Disease heart disease risks heart health Journal of the American College of Cardiology noise level meter noise meter noise pollution noise-cancelling headphones onetime Rese Source Type: news
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is an important health problem which may cause or worsen systemic diseases. Chronic intermittent hypoxia during repetitive airflow cessations may cause endothelial dysfunction. Sleep apnoea is also shown to be associated with hypercoagulability which may be due to decreased nitric oxide levels and impaired vasodilatation. Endothelial dysfunction, increased systemic inflammation, sympathetic nervous system activation, increased oxidative stress and dysglycaemia may all contribute to cardiovascular processes such as hypertension, arrhythmia, stroke, heart failure and coronary artery disease ...
Source: Postgraduate Medical Journal - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Reviews Source Type: research
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in up to 25% of otherwise healthy individuals. OSA is associated with intermittent hypoxia, oxidative stress, sympathetic activation, and an inflammatory response. These perturbations mediate the role of OSA as an independent and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). OSA can induce CVD or accelerate the progression of CVD into an end-stage disorder, including heart failure and stroke. Current clinical recommendations are based on existing clinical trial data and the clinical experience of our program; current and future clinical trials will help to optimize manage...
Source: Sleep Medicine Clinics - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Cardiology | Heart | Heart Failure | Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy | Respiratory Medicine | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Stroke