Namibia: Anthrax Outbreak Strikes Oshikoto

[New Era]Oshakati -The Oshikoto Regional Health Directorate is hard at work to trace thousands of people believed to have been exposed to anthrax-infected beef.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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Conclusion: This study shows that there is a knowledge gap about anthrax among the people in the affected communities. Key drivers for the anthrax outbreak such as poor cultural beliefs and practices and wildlife-livestock-human interactions were observed in all the three subcounties studied. All these findings could imply a high risk of outbreak of anthrax in Arua and Ugandan agricultural communities where the public health programs are less standardized and less effective. PMID: 33014075 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Tropical Medicine - Category: Tropical Medicine Tags: J Trop Med Source Type: research
Background: Anthrax continues to be a high priority pathogen in Uganda because of its potential for severe economic harm to livestock and humans. It is distributed globally and remains enzootic in many regions of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Central and South America (WHO, 2008).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: 0624 Source Type: research
Background: Anthrax is a zoonotic infection caused by the bacteria Bacillus anthracis. Humans acquire cutaneous infection through contact with infected animals or animal products. During May 2018, a sub-country chief in Kiruhura District received reports of humans with suspected cutaneous anthrax occurring subsequent to the sudden death of three cows on a farm on May 6. The human patients had reportedly participated in the butchery and consumption of meat from the dead cows; specimens from the animal carcasses tested positive for B.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: 0588 Source Type: research
Anthrax, a zoonotic disease is caused by the Gram positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. During January 2013, an anthrax outbreak among cattle was reported in Gundlupet Taluk, neighboring Bandipur National Park a...
Source: BMC Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
This post appears as an editorial in the July 2020 special COVID-19 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics by Sheri Fink, M.D., Ph.D. The anthrax mailings following the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States led to fears that victims of bioterrorism could overwhelm hospitals. The federal government convened experts to define how medical treatments should best be allocated across a population affected by a mass casualty disaster, a concept at first referred to as “altered standards of care,” later changed to the more palatable “crisis standards of care.” This work informed triage plans d...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear Editorial-AJOB pandemic Pandemic Ethics Source Type: blogs
Teresa Joseph Thanks to a U.S. Department of Defense contract for as much as $9.5 million, the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix and partners aim to develop a portable device to easily and accurately detects biological threats, including the virus that causes COVID-19. Today College of Medicine – Phoenix2017.07.28 ANBM Lab Shoot-1854-web-web.jpg Researchers in the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine in the College of Medicine – Phoenix work to create devices and diagnostics focused on personalized medicine. The center is leading an effort to develop a device for easy, qu...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant global consequences, with healthcare systems stretched to their limits, a growing death toll, and economic devastation as economies came grinding to a halt. The pandemic and its aftereffects will be with u...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news
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