Liberia: EU Warns of Other Diseases

[New Dawn]The Managing Director for Crisis Response and Operational Coordinator at the European External Action Service, Agostino Miozzo, said other diseases, including diarrhea, typhoid and malaria, are prevalent in the sub-region besides the Ebola Virus Disease that has claimed thousands of lives.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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DiscussionThe authors ’ experience at Princess Christian Maternity Hospital provides a model of screening, isolation, and care specifically for maternity patients, and directly addresses infection risk and mortality. The recommendations we provide can be used in future outbreaks.
Source: Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health - Category: Midwifery Authors: Tags: Quality Improvement Report Source Type: research
[WHO] By the time Kambale Kombi Vianey arrived at the Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC) in Beni in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in late November, he was at death's door. In the week since falling ill, he'd initially been misdiagnosed with malaria and typhoid, and then a traditional healer told him he'd been poisoned.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been developed. In the second golden age, the cell culture technology enabled polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines be dev...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
ConclusionAlthough collected prior to official active surveillance cases, case reporting through the IDSR during the 2007, 2008, and 2012 outbreaks coincided with official EVD epidemic curves. Additionally, all outbreak areas experienced increases in suspected cases for both malaria and typhoid fever during EVD outbreaks, underscoring the importance of training health care workers in recognizing EVD differential diagnoses and the potential for co‐morbidities.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Tropical Medicine and International Health - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Before the Ebola virus outbreak in parts of west Africa, the differential diagnoses of febrile illnesses were primarily centred around common medical conditions prevalent in the tropics that overburdened the weakened health systems there, predominantly malaria, typhoid fever, tuberculosis, meningitis, Lassa fever, and measles.1 With the 2014 –15 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic and its devastating effects, the need for differential diagnoses of febrile illnesses has taken on new urgency, as well as become more complicated.
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Comment Source Type: research
The recent Ebola virus Disease (EVD) outbreak occurred in West Africa was the largest reported since the virus was discovered. As the initial presentation of disease is non-specific, laboratory tests play an essential role to discriminate it from more common diseases such as malaria and typhoid fever. EVD is transmitted by direct contact with blood, secretions, organs, and other body fluids and airborne route has not been proved [1]. Clinical specimens from EVD patients may present a serious biohazard to laboratory workers and precautionary measures must be taken in order to reduce or eliminate the potential risk of accide...
Source: Journal of Clinical Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Short communication Source Type: research
As spring approaches, you may be thinking about this year’s summer getaway. Or maybe you’re an Type A planner who is already booking a Thanksgiving or Christmas trip. Whatever your travel style, here's something you probably haven't considered: How to stay healthy while abroad. While you probably won’t make a Pinterest board of vaccinations with the same enthusiasm as you pin must-eat pastries and stylish travel outfits, taking care of your health on a trip might just save your life. Here are seven tips to help keep your vacations as stress- and sickness-free as possible:  1. First, call your doctor....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions It is worth to document all available knowledge on the traditional management of EVD-like symptoms in order to evaluate systematically the anti-Ebola potential of Guinean plant species. Graphical abstract
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Anti-infectious human vaccination in historical perspective. Int Rev Immunol. 2015 Nov 25;:1-32 Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been deve...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Background Guinea is in the midst of the largest, longest, and deadliest outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (“Ebola” hereafter) ever recorded. As one of the three most affected countries in West Africa, which also include Liberia and Sierra Leone, Guinea has recorded 3,729 Ebola cases and 2,482 deaths (as of July 1, 2015) since the first case was diagnosed in March 2014.1 This mortality rate (67%) is higher than that of either Sierra Leone (30%) or Liberia (45%). The weekly caseload of the disease in Guinea has shown slight fluctuations throughout the epidemic, peaking at 171 cases during the final week of 2014.1 ...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
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