Surface micropattern limits bacterial contamination

Abstract Background Bacterial surface contamination contributes to transmission of nosocomial infections. Chemical cleansers used to control surface contamination are often toxic and incorrectly implemented. Additional non-toxic strategies should be combined with regular cleanings to mitigate risks of human error and further decrease rates of nosocomial infections. The Sharklet micropattern (MP), inspired by shark skin, is an effective tool for reducing bacterial load on surfaces without toxic additives. The studies presented here were carried out to investigate the MP surfaces capability to reduce colonization of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) compared to smooth control surfaces. Methods The MP and smooth surfaces produced in acrylic film were compared for remaining bacterial contamination and colonization following inoculation. Direct sampling of surfaces was carried out after inoculation by immersion, spray, and/or touch methods. Ultimately, a combination assay was developed to assess bacterial contamination after touch transfer inoculation combined with drying (persistence) to mimic common environmental contamination scenarios in the clinic or hospital environment. The combination transfer and persistence assay was then used to test antimicrobial copper beside the MP for the ability to reduce MSSA and MRSA challenge. ...
Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen leading to food poisoning as well as human infections. The present study examined the prevalence and characterization of antimicrobial-resistant S. aureus in sushi from 42 outlets and in pork products from eight outlets in Beijing, China. The total bacterial counts were between 3.0 and 8.9 log CFU/g (mean 5.5 ± 1.5 log CFU/g) in sushi products and 4.8 to 7.4 log CFU/g (mean 5.6 ± 0.8 log CFU/g) in pork products. The mean counts of coliforms were 2.7 and 2.9 log CFU/g in su...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Int J Microbiol Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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