A novel MRI approach for collateral flow imaging in ischemic stroke

Abstract Objective: Dedicated MRI sequences for evaluation of collaterals can be generated using MR perfusion (MRP) source data. We compared a novel collateral flow imaging technique with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for determining collateral circulation in acute stroke and evaluated the ability of MR‐based collateral flow maps to predict outcomes after recanalization therapy. Methods: Consecutive patients who were candidates for endovascular treatment were enrolled. A collateral flow map derived from MRP source data was generated by manual or automatic post‐processing. Collateral grading based on the collateral flow map was performed and compared with grading based on DSA. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated according to MR‐based collateral grading and early reperfusion (ER) status. Results: There was good correlation between MRI‐ and DSA‐based collateral grades (weighted κ‐coefficient=0.70). Collateral status and achievement of ER were the two main determinants of a favorable functional outcome and neurological improvement, as well as infarct growth. Regardless of achievement of ER, better collaterals were significantly associated with a lower modified Rankin score at day 90 (p
Source: Annals of Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

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In this study, 5% of VF arrest was due to PE: V fib is initial rhythm in PE in 3 of 60 cases. On the other hand, if the presenting rhythm is PEA, then pulmonary embolism is likely.  When there is VF in PE, it is not the initial rhythm, but occurs after prolonged PEA renders the myocardium ischemic.--Another study by Courtney and Kline found that, of cases of arrest that had autopsy and found that a presenting rhythm of VF/VT had an odds ratio of 0.02 for massive pulmonary embolism as the etiology, vs 41.9 for PEA.    ===================================MY Comment by KEN ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Direct compression of ICA is rare complication of pituitary apoplexy, which caused cerebral ischemia. Conventional angiography should be necessary for accurate diagnosis and prompt surgical decompression should be the treatment of choice. PMID: 32494388 [PubMed]
Source: Surgical Neurology International - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Surg Neurol Int Source Type: research
Conclusion: Compared to pCT, DECT within 36 h after IV thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, changes the radiological diagnosis of post-treatment ICH to “CS only” in a small proportion of patients. Studies are warranted of whether the altered radiological reports have an impact on patient management, for example initiation timing of antithrombotic secondary prevention.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Objective: To explore the value of whole-brain perfusion parameters combined with multiphase computed tomography angiography (MP-CTA) in predicting the hemorrhagic transformation (HT) of ischemic stroke. Methods: A total of 64 patients with ischemic stroke who underwent noncontrast computed tomography, computed tomography perfusion imaging, and computed tomography angiography before treatment from August 2017 to June 2019 were included retrospectively. The perfusion parameters cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT), time to maximum (Tmax), and permeability surfac...
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionOur everyday clinical practice experience suggests 9.8  % of consecutive AIS patients present in the 4.5–9 h window and 2.2 % adhere to EXTEND neuroimaging eligibility criteria for IVT. Only 1.3% of AIS is eligible for IVT according to EXTEND neuroimaging and clinical eligibility criteria.
Source: Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Written by Meyers, edits by SmithA 50-ish year old man was working construction when he suddenly collapsed. Coworkers started CPR within 1 minute of collapse. EMS arrived within 10 minutes and continued CPR and ACLS, noting alternating asystole and sinus bradycardia during rhythm checks. He received various ACLS medications and arrived at the ED with a perfusing rhythm.Initial vitals included heart rate around 100 bpm and BP 174/96. Here is his initial ECG, very soon after ROSC:What do you think?Sinus tachycardia.  There is incomplete RBBB (QRS duration less than 120 ms).  There is diffuse STD, maximal in V4-V5 a...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 16 October 2019Source: Epilepsy &BehaviorAuthor(s): Giada Pauletto, Francesco Bax, Gian Luigi Gigli, Simone Lorenzut, Lorenzo Verriello, Elisa Corazza, Mariarosaria ValenteAbstractAim of the studyThe aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with previous stroke (either ischemic or hemorrhagic), who developed status epilepticus (SE) mimicking a stroke relapse.Materials and methodsWe performed a retrospective cohort study of patients brought to hospital by the emergency service between December 2016 and January 2018 with a stroke code as possible candida...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with previous stroke (either ischemic or hemorrhagic), who developed status epilepticus (SE) mimicking a stroke relapse. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients brought to hospital by the emergency service between December 2016 and January 2018 with a stroke code as possible candidates for intravenous thrombolysis and who had already have a previous stroke. Among them, patients admitted for negative symptoms and finally discharged with a diagnosis of SE mimicking stroke...
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewUrgent reperfusion treatment with intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy reduces disability after ischaemic stroke. Imaging plays an important role in identifying patients who benefit, particularly in extended time windows. However, the role of post-treatment neuroimaging is less well established. We review recent advances in neuroimaging after reperfusion treatment and provide a practical guide to the options and management implications.Recent FindingsPost-treatment imaging is critical to identify patients with reperfusion-related haemorrhage and oedema requiring intervention. It also...
Source: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Conclusions: Up to date, no data about PCIS and IVT are available from RTCs. Based on limited results from retrospective clinical studies and case series, IVT is safer for use in PCIS than in ACIS. Patients with brainstem ischemia, vertebral artery occlusion, and absence of basilar or posterior cerebral artery occlusion could be considered for treatment with IVT even in borderline cases. Time to IVT in PCIS seems to be a less crucial factor than in ACIS. IVT for PCIS may be beneficial even after 4.5 h from symptom onset. Introduction History of Intravenous Thrombolysis—The Most Relevant Studies Intravenous t...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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