Kenya: Malaria Is Number One Killer in Kenya

[The Star]Malaria is the number one killer disease in Kenya. A government report shows that more than 23 thousand people died as a result of malaria last year, while pneumonia killed more than 22 thousand Kenyans, making it the second killer. Cancer has been ranked third followed by HIV and TB.
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news
Abstract CD36 is a multifunctional glycoprotein, expressed in different types of cells and known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of the host. The structural studies revealed that the scavenger receptor consists of short cytosolic domains, two transmembrane domains and a large ectodomain. The ectodomain serves as a receptor for a diverse number of endogenous and exogenous ligands. The CD36-specific ligands are involved in regulating the immune response during infectious and non-infectious diseases in the host. The role of CD36 in regulating the innate immune response during Pneumonia, Tuberculosis...
Source: Current Drug Discovery Technologies - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Drug Discov Technol Source Type: research
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs
Authors: Maroyi A Abstract Croton macrostachyus is widely used as herbal medicine by the indigenous people of tropical Africa. The potential of C. macrostachyus as herbal medicine, the phytochemistry, and pharmacological properties of its parts used as herbal medicines are reviewed. The extensive literature survey revealed that C. macrostachyus is traditionally used to treat or manage at least 81 human and animal diseases and ailments. The species is used as herbal medicine for diseases and ailments such as abdominal pains, cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, malaria, pneumonia, sexually transmitted infections, ski...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
A quarter of all global deaths of children under five are due to unhealthy or polluted environments including dirty water and air, second-hand smoke and a lack or adequate hygiene, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday. Such unsanitary and polluted environments can lead to fatal cases of diarrhea, malaria and pneumonia, the WHO said in a report, and kill 1.7 million children a year. “A polluted environment is a deadly one -– particularly for young children,” WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said in a statement. “Their developing organs and immune systems, and smaller bodies and airway...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. For people suffering from painful diseases in remote parts of the world, neighbors volunteering as health educators can be their best shot at getting help. Ordinary people, without any formal medical training, have stepped up to teach others about common illnesses in the province of Nampula, Mozambique, which has one of the highest rates of neglected tropical diseases in the country ― but where many people live in remote, rural communities, far from any health centers. As p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: 8–14 October 2016 Source:The Lancet, Volume 388, Issue 10053 Author(s): GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death CollaboratorsHaidongWangMohsenNaghaviChristineAllenRyan MBarberZulfiqar ABhuttaAustinCarterDaniel CCaseyFiona JCharlsonAlan ZianChenMatthew MCoatesMeganCoggeshallLalitDandonaDaniel JDickerHolly EErskineAlize JFerrariChristinaFitzmauriceKyleForemanMohammad HForouzanfarMaya SFraserNancyFullmanPeter WGethingEllen MGoldbergNicholasGraetzJuanita AHaagsmaSimon IHayChantalHuynhCatherine OJohnsonNicholas JKassebaumYohannesKinfuXie RachelKulikoffMichaelKutzHmwe HKyuHeidi JLarsonJanniLeungXiaofengLi...
Source: The Lancet - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
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