Johns Hopkins Scientists Alter Fat Metabolism in Animals to Prevent Most Common Type of Heart Disease - 4/22/14

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans.
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - Category: Research Source Type: news

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A risk-based prevention strategy is the most widely accepted approach to guide clinician-patient decision-making for prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). According to this approach, the intensity of prevention efforts is matched to the estimated risk of the individual. American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines currently recommend pooled cohort equations for initial risk assessment, which integrate age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking status, and treatment for hypertension and diabetes to provide race- and sex-specific estimates of ...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disorder of insulin resistance — a reduced sensitivity to the action of insulin — which leads to high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. Approximately 12% of American adults have T2D, and more than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, a precursor to T2D. This is a major public health concern, as T2D dramatically increases risk for heart disease, including heart attacks, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure. The development and progression of T2D is affected by many factors. Some, such as a person’s race/ethnicity, age, and gender cannot be modified. Others, including...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) Is there really “good” cholesterol and “bad” cholesterol? The medical community has branded low density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol “bad” because high levels are linked to plaque buildup in the arteries, heart disease, and risk of ischemic stroke. However, a new study from Penn State University argues that LDL cholesterol is necessary in...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Alwi I Abstract Over more than two decades, the concept of atherosclerosis has developed and lead to inflammatory hypothesis. Inflammation plays an important role on pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and coronary heart disease (CHD), including acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although the management of ACS has been demonstrated to be beneficial for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (such as using statin and aspirin) and also seemed to have positive effect on inflammation, the identification of effective management, specifically targeting inflammation, has been not been comprehensively understood....
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
(Natural News) Heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases (e.g., stroke) are the leading causes of death in western countries. These diseases are caused by several factors, such as hypertension, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, smoking and obesity. However, recent studies have found that there is another unexpected contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis (blood clot...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: The Suita CVD risk model is feasible to use and improves predictability of the incidence of CVD relative to the FRS model in Japan. PMID: 32023562 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis - Category: Cardiology Tags: J Atheroscler Thromb Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) — For years doctors have warned people with high cholesterol not to eat too many eggs, but a new large study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds regular egg consumption may not be that bad for the heart. Researchers in Canada looked at data on almost 180,000 people from 50 countries and found that people who ate at least an egg a day were no more likely to have high cholesterol, cardiovascular events like heart attacks or strokes and no more likely to die prematurely than people who rarely ate eggs. That said, you can make eggs unhealthy by adding unhealthy fats, so be careful h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News Syndicated CBSN Boston Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Health Source Type: news
Finnish researchers found that adults in their country at risk for heart disease and stroke who took cholesterol- or blood pressure-lowering medications were more likely to reduce their activity levels and gain weight.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study found an association between stroke risk and longer sleep, longer midday napping, or poor sleep quality. But an association is not the same as causation. Rather than longer sleep duration causing strokes, there are other possible explanations for the findings. For example, people who sleep more at night or nap more during the day may have other risk factors for stroke, such as: A higher incidence of depression. Excessive sleeping or poor sleep quality may be symptoms of depression, and prior studies have noted higher stroke rates among depressed individuals. A more sedentary lifestyle. Those who are not active ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Hypertension and Stroke Sleep Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The Statistical Update represents a critical resource for the lay public, policy makers, media professionals, clinicians, healthcare administrators, researchers, health advocates, and others seeking the best available data on these factors and conditions. PMID: 31992061 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circulation Source Type: research
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