Experts say inexpensive drug could slow heart disease for type 1 diabetic patients

Scientists believe a drug commonly prescribed for type 2 diabetes could be routinely taken by type 1 diabetic patients to slow the development or delay heart disease.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 23 May 2019Source: Diabetes &Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &ReviewsAuthor(s): María M. Adeva-Andany, Raquel Funcasta-Calderón, Carlos Fernández-Fernández, Eva Ameneiros-Rodríguez, Alberto Domínguez-MonteroAbstractPatients with diabetes experience increased cardiovascular risk that is not fully explained by deficient glycemic control or traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking and hypercholesterolemia. Asymptomatic patients with diabetes show structural and functional vascular damage that includes impaired vasodilatio...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Sarah K. Azzam1, Wael M. Osman2, Sungmun Lee1, Kinda Khalaf1, Ahsan H. Khandoker1, Wael Almahmeed3,4, Herbert F. Jelinek5 and Habiba S. Al Safar1,2* 1Biomedical Engineering Department, Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 2Khalifa University Center of Biotechnology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3Institute of Cardiac Science, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 4Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 5Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Sydney and School of Community Health, Charles Sturt University, Ma...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Gulcin Tezcan1, Ekaterina V. Martynova1, Zarema E. Gilazieva1, Alan McIntyre2, Albert A. Rizvanov1 and Svetlana F. Khaiboullina1,3* 1Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia 2Centre for Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV, United States Inflammation has a crucial role in protection against various pathogens. The inflammasome is an intracellular multiprotein signaling complex that is linked to pathogen sensing and...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
From the Incretin Concept and the Discovery of GLP-1 to Today's Diabetes Therapy Jens Juul Holst* Department of Biomedical Sciences, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Researchers have been looking for insulin-stimulating factors for more than 100 years, and in the 1960ties it was definitively proven that the gastrointestinal tract releases important insulinotropic factors upon oral glucose intake, so-called incretin hormones. The first significant factor identified was the duodenal glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, GIP, wh...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In conclusion, TSF improved lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis by inducing the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway-mediated autophagy. Introduction Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a worldwide health concern due to the increased incidence of obesity and diabetes. In addition, NAFLD is closely associated with the risk factors of coronary heart disease, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia, which are considered to be the leading causes of death (Wiest et al., 2017). Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD has significantly improved, there is still no effective medica...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our results show worldwide efficacy of BM-MSCs in improving functional outcomes in pre-clinical animal models of stroke and support testing these cells in clinical trials in various ranges of time windows using different delivery routes. The continued growing number of publications showing functional benefit of BM-MSCs are now adding limited value to an oversaturated literature spanning 18 years. Researchers should focus on identifying definitive mechanisms on how BM-MSCs lead to benefit in stroke models. Introduction Ischemic stroke is the 5th leading cause of death and the leading cause of long term di...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study was hypothesis-driven; the genetic variants were selected for being previously and substantially genotyped. The big sample size and the rich panel of other biomarkers allowed the authors to conduct much more detailed analyses on this topic. The third article by Provenzi et al. proposed their perspectives on the role of telomeres in premature birth and discussed the potential implications for early adversity and care in the neonatal intensive care unit (Pavanello et al.). Indeed, the speculation of telomeres in aging begins in the premature aging syndrome. It is thus interesting to examine if telomeres also play...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
In this study, we explore shared epigenetic mechanisms of the association between mtDNA content and insulin levels, supporting the developmental origins of this link. First, the association between cord blood insulin and mtDNA content in 882 newborns of the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort was assessed. Cord blood mtDNA content was established via qPCR, while cord blood levels of insulin were determined using electrochemiluminescence immunoassays. Then the cord blood DNA methylome and transcriptome were determined in 179 newborns, using the human 450K methylation Illumina and Agilent Whole Human Genome 8 × 60 K microarrays, r...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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