Favorable lifestyle before diagnosis associated with lower risk of screen-detected advanced colorectal neoplasia.

CONCLUSION: Adopted healthy behaviors were inversely associated with the probability of ACN detection. Lifestyle assessment might be useful for risk stratification in CRC screening. PMID: 27468217 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research

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Condition:   Colorectal Cancer Interventions:   Other: Right time eating;   Other: Delayed time eating;   Procedure: Sigmoidoscopy;   Procedure: Optional 24h circadian assessment in the Biological Rhythms lab;   Other: Alcohol Sponsor:   Rush University Medical Center Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
When planning national screening programs, it is important to investigate potential changes in health behavior initiated by the screening. Knowledge of the consequences of different colorectal cancer (CRC) screening modalities for health behavior is limited. We aimed to investigate differences in 1-year health behavior changes after testing negative in CRC screening by one of two screening modalities. Participants of both sexes aged 50–74 years assigned randomly to five biennial rounds of fecal immunochemical test (FIT), one round of flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS), or no screening (control) were invited to complete a se...
Source: European Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Research Paper: Gastrointestinal Cancer Source Type: research
Abstract Colorectal cancer is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Most colorectal cancers arise from preexisting adenomatous or serrated polyps. The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer can be reduced with screening of average-risk adults 50 to 75 years of age. Randomized controlled trials show evidence of reduced colorectal cancer-specific mortality with guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests and flexible sigmoidoscopy. There are no randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of colonoscopy to reduce colorectal cancer-specific mortality; however, several randomized control...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA 2Social &Scientific Systems, Inc., Durham, North Carolina, USA 3Westat, Durham, North Carolina, USA 4Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway 5Biostatistics and Computational Biology Branch, NIEHS, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA PDF Version (548 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Bac...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to investigate the various factors that influence colorectal cancer screening in Michigan using 6091 participants in the Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System representing adults ≥ 50 years old.MethodsScreening for colorectal cancer was assessed as fecal occult blood testing or colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy. Full models simultaneously adjusted for alcohol use, angina/coronary heart disease, stroke, heart attack, gender, income, marital status, race, age, diabetes, disability, exercise, health care coverage, health care access, smoking, and mental health. Data analysis ...
Source: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Conclusions: Risk factor modification, screening, and treatment all have considerable potential to reduce colorectal cancer mortality by 2030, with the largest potential reduction observed for improved treatment and risk factor modification. Impact: The estimation of these health impact measures provides useful information that can be applied in public health decision-making. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1420–6. ©2017 AACR.
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Articles Source Type: research
A new study released by the National Cancer Institute shows colon and rectal cancers have increased dramatically and steadily in young and middle-age adults in the United States over the past four decades. Dr. Yixing Jiang, a Medical Oncologist at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center, answers all the questions you’re now asking yourself about colon cancer. Q. What are the risk factors for colon cancer? A. The risks for developing colon cancer are: obesity; insulin resistance diabetes, red and processed meat; tobacco; alcohol; family history of colorectal cancer; certain hereditary syndrom...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Tips colon cancer maryland research study treating colon cancer Source Type: blogs
Racial and ethnic disparities exist in cancer screening and management among Hispanics. Although cancer poses a burden among Hispanic women compared to non-Hispanic white women (nHw), screening rates for breast, colorectal and cervical cancer in Hispanic women lag behind nHw. The Hispanic population is heterogeneous and comprises individuals with diverse heritages. Furthermore, considerable variations in health outcomes and practices have been observed across Hispanic subgroups, supporting the relevance of studying each subgroup separately. Since early detection can reduce the burden of cancer, it is important to identify ...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Race, Admixture, and Ethnicity: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Source Type: research
Are you, or is someone you know, postponing their colonoscopy? Maybe it’s the idea of that prep. At best, it requires being home and near a toilet for a day. Worse, it can make people feel awfully ill. Or maybe it’s the invasiveness of the test. At best, it’s unpleasant. At worst, there can be serious complications, including an instrument puncturing the bowel, bleeding, and organ damage. It’s also time-consuming, requiring time off work for you and whoever will be driving you home. Why is a colonoscopy worth the hassle? Cancers of the colon and rectum are common, and lives can be saved with early d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Digestive Disorders Health Healthy Aging Screening Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Estimated intakes of meat mutagens were not significantly associated with CRC risk over 14 years of follow-up in the NHS and HPFS cohorts. Results for PhIP from red but not from white meat warrant further investigation. Citation: Le NT, Michels FA, Song M, Zhang X, Bernstein AM, Giovannucci EL, Fuchs CS, Ogino S, Chan AT, Sinha R, Willett WC, Wu K. 2016. A prospective analysis of meat mutagens and colorectal cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Environ Health Perspect 124:1529–1536; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP238 *These authors contributed equally to this...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Article October 2016 Source Type: research
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