Why We Shouldn’t Focus on Developing Alzheimer’s Treatments

Recently, The New York Times announced the creation of a partnership between the National Institutes of Health, 10 pharmaceutical companies and seven nonprofit organizations dedicated to the development of drugs to treat, among other things, Alzheimer’s disease. While at first blush, this five-year, $230 million effort may seem noble, the ultimate motivation for this seemingly ecumenical event is suspect. Alzheimer’s disease affects some 5.4 million Americans, and according to a recent report from the RAND Corporation, costs Americans in the neighborhood of $200 billion each year to care for those afflicted. To contextualize this figure, it represents about twice what is spent on caring for heart disease patients. But it doesn’t factor in the emotional expense borne by the family members of Alzheimer’s patients whose lives are irreparably compromised by this disease. Drug companies, as the Times article reported, “… have invested staggering amounts of money in developing drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease, for example, but again and again the medications have failed in testing.” Just last month the New England Journal of Medicine reported that two of the latest candidates for treating Alzheimer’s disease had failed, miserably, to provide any meaningful benefit. Even more disturbing was the recent report in the Journal of the American Medical Association  demonstrating that the Alzheimer’s drug memantine, curren...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - Category: Neurologists Authors: Tags: Science Alzheimer’s fat FDA Memantine NIH olive oil Vitamin E Source Type: blogs

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The plants trap polluting particles like natural air filters, and protect against flooding, tooHedges and trees in towns and cities are more than just attractive, they can behave like natural air filters, trapping traffic pollution made up of dangerous microscopic particles blamed for a range of serious health problems, ranging from heart disease, asthma and strokes to diabetes, obesity and dementia.Astudy at Lancaster University showed that silver birch trees maintained as hedges at about the height of an adult person were particularly good at cleaning the air.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Trees and forests Air pollution Science Environment UK news University of Surrey Lancaster University Source Type: news
In this study, we established a prediction system to assess the risk of MCI among the elderly in China.MethodsThe Rothman-Keller model was conducted on the basis of the risk factors of MCI obtained by the combined results of a meta-analysis. The accuracy of the model was verified using actual population data.ResultsA total of 1826 subjects as a verification set were enrolled in this study in February 2019. There were statistically significant differences in the combined results of 10 risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, educational level, hyperlipidemia, smoking, physical exercise, living alone, stroke, drinking and heart disease (P
Source: The Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Major Depression — the clinical type — is not a normal part of aging. Though it can appear at any age, older adults are at an increased risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) distinguishes this condition from having “the blues” and likens it to other medical illnesses that are treatable, like diabetes or hypertension. Overwhelming sadness and anxiety can last for weeks at a time or much longer, with a wide range of other discouraging symptoms. Yet, there are things that can help.  Statistics tell us that later in life, at least one chronic disease will affect 80 percent of u...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Depression depression risk Elderly seniors Source Type: blogs
The majority of doctors will tell you that there is nothing you can do to reverse fatty liver and that health problems such as cirrhosis and liver failure may be in your future that they will address with the awful “solution” of liver transplant. The truth is the opposite: fatty liver is easily and readily reversible in virtually everybody, provided you take action before irreversible changes take place and are given the right information and tools. In this video, I discuss the three basic phenomena that drive fat deposition, liver damage, and inflammation that lead to this condition: Carbohydrate consumption ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open bowel flora carbohydrates carbs Inflammation NAFLD nash triglycerides undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Scientists believe an everyday bug commonly found in the mouth could be to blame for dementia, heart disease and diabetes while work is ongoing for a vaccine to kill off the bacteria.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
A sizable body of evidence, both mechanistic and epidemiological, supports the idea that exercise slows age-related cognitive decline. The report here is an example of the type, noting the results of a study in which some of the participants were assigned to an exercise program. The exercising participants exhibited a slower decline in cognitive function, particularly memory, in comparison to the others. This is a representative result: in general, the consensus in the scientific literature is that regular exercise is beneficial to cognitive function over the long term. Researchers theorized that the healthy lifes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
According to the study, the Philippines had the highest inactivity levels among boys, at 93 per cent, while in South Korea, researchers found that 97 per cent of girls failed to do enough exercise. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPSBy External SourceUNITED NATIONS, Nov 22 2019 (IPS) An alarming lack of exercise among adolescents across the world risks seriously compromising their health into adulthood, the UN said on Thursday. In the first study of its kind on global and regional trends among 11 to 17-year-olds, the World Health Organization (WHO) said that around 80 percent of them do less than 60 minutes of activity pe...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news
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