Engineering of measles virus to target cancer cells, an attempt

Background: Regardless of general perception as potentially dangerous pathogens, viruses have been exploited and used as vaccine agents or as carriers for gene therapy. Similar positive effects have been observed in case of cancer patients getting infected with viruses, where infection has resulted in temporary tumor regression. Hence, the development of a recombinant virus that selectively infects and kills cancer cells can be a promising anti-cancer tool in near future. Here we made an attempt to generate an oncolytic virus using Measles viral genome (Edmonston strain) backbone and to further arm this recombinant virus with non viral genes of known anti-proliferative activity to enhance its antitumor activity.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Type: Poster Presentation Source Type: research

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m Self-replicating single-stranded RNA viruses such as alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles viruses, and rhabdoviruses provide efficient delivery and high-level expression of therapeutic genes due to their high capacity of RNA replication. This has contributed to novel approaches for therapeutic applications including vaccine development and gene therapy-based immunotherapy. Numerous studies in animal tumor models have demonstrated that self-replicating RNA viral vectors can generate antibody responses against infectious agents and tumor cells. Moreover, protection against challenges with pathogenic Ebola virus was obta...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff
Source: MedPage Today Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
The measles news continues: an outbreak in New Jersey, continuing outbreaks in Europe, and a mother of a child with cancer pleads with people to get the measles vaccine.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
The measles news continues: an outbreak in New Jersey, continuing outbreaks in Europe, and a mother of a child with cancer pleads with people to get the measles vaccine.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
The measles news continues: an outbreak in New Jersey, continuing outbreaks in Europe, and a mother of a child with cancer pleads with people to get the measles vaccine.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
In this study, we developed a new non-integrating measles virus (MV) vector-based delivery system with F deletion to eliminate cell membrane fusion-associated cytotoxicity. MV vectors transduced genes through MV receptors including CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150/SLAM). First, we examined transduction efficiencies of MV vectors and SV vectors in hematopoietic cells by using GFP expression vectors (MV-Gs and SV-Gs). Compared to SV-Gs, our MV-Gs allowed more efficient gene transfer into most hematopoietic cell type including T (3-fold) and B cells (7-fold) (Fig. 1). Furthermore, at the same multiplic...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 801. Gene Therapy and Transfer: Poster II Source Type: research
Conclusion: In the lowest dose levels tested to date, VSV-IFNβ-NIS has not led to any observed dose limiting toxicity. Dose escalation is ongoing and updated results will be reported.DisclosuresLacy: Celgene: Research Funding. Peng: Vyriad: Equity Ownership. Russell: Vyriad: Equity Ownership. Dueck: Bayer: Employment; Phytogine: Employment; Pfizer: Honoraria. Witzig: Celgene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Dispenzieri: Celgene, Takeda, Prothena, Jannsen, Pfizer, Alnylam, GSK: Research Funding. Gertz: spectrum: Consultancy, Honoraria; Physicians Educa...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 653. Myeloma: Therapy, excluding Transplantation: Poster II Source Type: research
Beloved Hollywood celebrities, famous politicians or members of the British royal family: no better advertisement for fitness tracker producers and health tech companies. As models, actors and actresses are highly influential people, their early adoption of digital solutions could also push the masses towards living more healthily with technologies. On the other hand, celebrities are inclined to follow questionable health trends, too, which go against decades of medical evidence. Those examples, everyone should rather reject. Wearables conquered Hollywood, the White House, and the British royal family Celebrities are all a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Social media in Healthcare celebrities digital health digital technologies digital technology famous fitness future health influencer health influencers Hollywood trackers trends wearables wellness Source Type: blogs
Do all medical educators start out by publishing advanced research? Or do some try their hand at something else first? We asked the members of the Academic Medicine editorial board about their first publication. This is what they said. M. Brownell Anderson, National Board of Medical Examiners Except for serving as editor of my high school newspaper, my first publication was: Soler NG, Mast TA, Anderson MB, Kienzler L. A logbook system for monitoring student skills and experiences. J Med Educ. 1981;56:775-777. My first publication as first author was: Anderson MB, Mast TA, Soler NG. A required internal medicine precept...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Editorial Board Q & A Featured Academic Medicine Anthony R. Artino Jr Brenessa Lindeman Bridget C. O’Brien Carrie L. Byington Christopher S. Candler Colin P. West Denice Cora-Bramble Grace Huang John P. Sánchez M. Brownell Ander Source Type: blogs
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news
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