Potential for misuse & diversion of opioids to addicts should not overshadow their therapeutic value

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Opioids are very effective for treating some types of pain, such as cancer pain and postoperative pain, but not for other kinds of pain like chronic low back pain. An increase in the number of opioid-related deaths among addicts has led to the current movement to restrict opioid prescribing by state and federal authorities. While a laudable goal, these restrictions threaten to block their use for safe and effective pain relief when medically indicated.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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Conclusion Evidence of clinical benefit of most available apps is very limited. Design features that enhance usability and maximise efficacy were identified. A provisional 'first-pass' evaluation framework is proposed that can help decide which apps should be endorsed by government agencies following more detailed technical assessments and which could then be recommended with confidence by clinicians to their patients.What is known about the topic? Smartphone health apps have attracted considerable interest from patients and health managers as a means of promoting more effective self-management of chronic diseases, which l...
Source: Australian Health Review - Category: Hospital Management Authors: Tags: Aust Health Rev Source Type: research
Low back pain, the scourge of mankind: it is the second leading cause of disability here in the United States, and the fourth worldwide. It’s also one of the top five medical problems for which people see doctors. Almost every day that I see patients, I see someone with back pain. It’s one of the top reasons for lost wages due to missed work, as well as for healthcare dollars spent, hence, a very expensive problem. Looking at two kinds of back pain Let’s talk about the most common forms of back pain: acute (which lasts less than four weeks) and subacute (which lasts four to 12 weeks). Most of these cases ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Managing your health care Pain Management Source Type: blogs
When I was in medical school, doctors only wrote prescriptions for opioid painkillers for terminal cancer patients, surgical patients and critical emergencies. That's because they knew these drugs were lethal. Opioids come from the same poppy plant used to make opium and heroin. And just like those addictive street drugs, the risk of getting hooked on them is extremely high. It's incredible how things have changed since then… What are opioids prescribed for? Today, you're likely to get a prescription for opioids for just about any kind of pain. That includes chronic pain, fibromyalgia, depression, heada...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Natural Cures Source Type: news
By Stacy SimonThe ancient Indian practice of yoga combines meditation, breathing, and precise postures and poses to make a connection with thoughts, body, and spirit. People who practice yoga claim it leads to a state of physical health, relaxation, happiness, peace, and tranquility.Some evidence shows that yoga can lower stress, increase strength, and lessen lower back pain, while providing exercise. And according to a report from the National Institutes of Health, there is also some evidence to suggest yoga may be helpful when used alongside conventional medical treatment to help relieve some of the symptoms linked to ca...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Complementary and Alternative Methods Source Type: news
Follow me at @mallikamarshall If your doctor told you that she was giving you a placebo and that it would help you, would you believe her? As it turns out, based on new research, maybe you should. Placebos are often considered “fake” treatments. You may have heard them described as “sugar pills.” They usually take the form of pills, injections, or even entire procedures that are used in clinical trials to test “real” treatments. For example, one group of study participants is given an active drug and another group is given a placebo, which looks exactly like the active medication but is ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pain Management Source Type: news
Over the last year, the general public has been inundated with a steady stream of reports about the dangers of opiates — pain medicines like codeine, Percocet, and OxyContin. The harm in terms of ruined lives and death from illicit drugs such as heroin is not news. But what is new, and concerning, are the risks of prescription pain medicines — those doctors prescribe for pain due to a range of causes, including musculoskeletal problems like low back pain. The history of using opiates for chronic pain Back pain isn’t a new problem either, but the history of how doctors have treated it is probably new to ma...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Back Pain Behavioral Health Pain Management Source Type: news
Conclusion This systematic review found no evidence that opioids provide a meaningful effect on chronic non-specific lower back pain. Opioids are often used as a last resort for people who have not responded to other painkillers. But these results found opioids gave only half the size of the effect that would be needed to make a real difference – about a 10-point score difference, rather than 20. On the whole, the body of evidence was high quality. A large number of trials where identified, and most were multi-centre trials with good sample sizes carried out in the US, Canada, Australia and Europe. This means ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Neurology Source Type: news
"Please, I need my Oxycodone! " my patient, M, pleaded with me. My eyes met his. I observed every fleeting facial expression, hoping to gauge his intentions. The discussion about whether to continue to prescribe this medication was one I 'd had too many times with too many patients over the past few months. "My arthritis is always worst in the winter, " he said, rubbing his lower back. It was a snowy afternoon in clinic, and M and I were in the midst of a debate. Oxycodone is an opioid medication, and, like other painkillers such as Oxycontin, Percocet, and Vicodin, it carries...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
"Please, I need my Oxycodone!" my patient, M, pleaded with me. My eyes met his. I observed every fleeting facial expression, hoping to gauge his intentions. The discussion about whether to continue to prescribe this medication was one I'd had too many times with too many patients over the past few months. "My arthritis is always worst in the winter," he said, rubbing his lower back. It was a snowy afternoon in clinic, and M and I were in the midst of a debate. Oxycodone is an opioid medication, and, like other painkillers such as Oxycontin, Percocet, and Vicodin, it carries a significant risk of ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: TR and BFB are effective for anxiety and somatic stress-related disorders, associated with coping and quality of life improvement and affordable costs; they are minimally invasive but needing an active participation in the treatment process. Some limits are responders' prediction, continuity of practice and limited effectiveness for depression disorders. Finally, it is shown that they are real psychosomatic therapies that are able to produce somatic peripheral changes (neuroendocrine, neurovegetative and muscular systems) generated by the mind and secondary to the involvement of central neurotransmitter circui...
Source: Rivista di Psichiatria - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Riv Psichiatr Source Type: research
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