Statins reduce spirochetal burden and modulate immune responses in the C3H/HeN mouse model of Lyme disease

Publication date: Available online 16 March 2016 Source:Microbes and Infection Author(s): Tricia A. Van Laar, Camaron Hole, S.L. Rajasekhar Karna, Christine L. Miller, Robert Reddick, Floyd L. Wormley, J. Seshu Lyme disease (LD) is a systemic disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme spirochetes encode for a functional 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR EC 1.1.1.88) serving as a rate limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that contribute to components critical for cell wall biogenesis. Statins have been shown to inhibit B. burgdorferi in vitro. Using a mouse model of Lyme disease, we found that statins contribute to reducing bacterial burden and altering the murine immune response to favor clearance of spirochetes.
Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. The presence of cholesterol glycolipids in the membranes of Borrelia burgdorferi was detected and characterized by biophysical and biochemical approaches.  Cholesterol glycolipids are present in both the outer and inner membranes, but are different in composition and their ability to form lipid rafts and in their associated proteins.
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