RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™): a guide to its use

Abstract RTS,S/AS01 (Mosquirix™), the first malaria vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, is indicated for the active immunization of infants and children aged 6 weeks to 17 months, with three intramuscular doses administered at months 0, 1 and 2 and a booster dose administered at month 20. In a phase 3 trial, RTS,S/AS01 had efficacy in both infants aged 6–12 weeks and children aged 5–17 months, with an acceptable tolerability profile. However, the duration of protection afforded by RTS,S/AS01 remains unclear. In modelling studies, RTS,S/AS01 had a significant public health impact was cost effective. The WHO has recommended pilot implementation of RTS,S/AS01 in children aged 5–17 months before a wider scale-up is considered.
Source: Drugs and Therapy Perspectives - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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(Deakin University) Researchers have narrowed down the malaria proteins and disease-fighting antibodies that could be used to develop a vaccine against the most severe forms of malaria.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Abstract Malaria is a disease of public health importance in many parts of the world. Currently, there is no effective way to eradicate malaria, so developing safe, efficient, and cost-effective vaccines against this disease remains an important goal. Current research on malaria vaccines is focused on developing vaccines against pre-erythrocytic stage parasites and blood-stage parasites or on developing a transmission-blocking vaccine. Here, we briefly describe the progress made towards a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, the most pathogenic of the malaria parasite species to infect humans. PMID: 3168740...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Control and elimination of malaria can be accelerated by transmission-blocking interventions such as vaccines. A surface antigen of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, Pfs230, is a leading vaccine target antigen, ...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The safety profile of RTS,S/AS01 in HIV-infected children was comparable to that of the comparator (meningococcal or rabies) vaccines. RTS,S/AS01 was immunogenic in HIV-infected children but antibody concentrations were lower than in children with an unknown or negative HIV status. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00866619. PMID: 31708182 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract Plasmodium vivax, the chronic relapsing human malaria parasite with the most widespread distribution, possesses proteins associated with the merozoite surface that could be targets for host immune responses and potential vaccine candidates. Of these, the merozoite surface protein 3 of P. vivax (PvMSP3) is an attractive vaccine target as well as a genetic marker for epidemiological surveillance. PvMSP3 comprises a group of protein members encoded by a multigene family. Although some protein members, i.e. PvMSP3α and PvMSP3β, have been targets for molecular and immunological investigations, the m...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
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Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
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Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
In this study, using samples collected from young children in Ghana at multiple time points during a longitudinal study, we adapted a predictive modelling framework which combines feature selection and machine learning techniques to identify an antigen signature of clinical immunity to malaria. Our results show that an individual's immune status can be accurately predicted by measuring antibody responses to a small defined set of 15 target antigens. We further demonstrate that the identified immune signature is highly versatile and capable of providing precise and accurate estimates of clinical protection from malaria in a...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Proteomics : MCP - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Mol Cell Proteomics Source Type: research
Lassa fever outbreaks West Africa have caused up to 10,000 deaths annually. Primary infection occurs from contact with Lassa virus-infected rodents and exposure to their excreta, blood, or meat. Incubation takes 2 to 21  days. Symptoms are difficult to distinguish from malaria, typhoid, dengue, yellow fever, and other viral hemorrhagic fevers. Clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic, to mild, to severe fulminant disease. Ribavirin can improve outcomes. Overall mortality is between 1% and 15%. Lassa fever s hould be considered in the differential diagnosis with travel to West Africa. There is an urgent need for...
Source: Infectious Diseases Clinics of North America - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Illness is universal, health care is not. Over half of the world’s 7.3 billion people, including 1 billion in rural communities, lack access to health care. Approximately 13 million children still go without a single dose of any vaccine. Nearly 9 million newborns, children and mothers still die each year from preventable or treatable conditions. Compounding this crisis is a massive health-worker shortage, forecast to grow to 18 million by 2030. Training more doctors is necessary, but because doctors are concentrated in cities, they alone are insufficient to close this gap. What if the residents of rural communities&n...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare Source Type: news
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