Tanzania: Search for Malaria Vaccine Gets Boost

[Citizen] Melbourne -Researchers at Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have discovered why the body's immune system is unable to develop immunity during a malaria infection.
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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The development of malaria vaccines is constrained by genetic polymorphisms exhibited by Plasmodium falciparum antigens. The project the age-dependent distribution of alleles or haplotypes of three P. falciparum ...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Funding Opportunity RFA-AI-20-064 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this initiative is to support research to advance understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms that contribute to malaria vaccine-elicited protection or vaccine hypo-responsiveness in endemic regions by capitalizing on recent research advances in systems vaccinology and systems immunology as well as emerging opportunities in data science and informatics. Multidisciplinary science and collaboration among investigators from the malaria vaccine research field and other relevant scientific areas are highly encouraged. The goal i...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
CONCLUSIONS: BK-SE36/CpG has an acceptable safety profile. Use of CpG-ODN(K3) greatly enhanced immunogenicity in malaria naïve Japanese adults when compared to BK-SE36 alone. The utility of BK-SE36/CpG is currently under evaluation in a malaria endemic setting in West Africa. TRIAL REGISTRATION: JMACCT Clinical Trial Registry JMA-IIA00109. PMID: 33012605 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Despite extensive research, the development of an effective malaria vaccine remains elusive. The induction of robust and sustained T cell and antibody response by vaccination is an urgent unmet need. Chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform. VLPs are composed of multiple subunit capsomeres which can be rapidly produced in a cost-effective manner, but the ability of capsomeres to induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses has not been thoroughly investigated. Accordingly, we have compared chimeric VLPs and their sub-unit capsomeres for capacity to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell and antibody ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Malaria continues to pose a severe threat to over half of the world's population each year. With no long-term, effective vaccine available and a growing resistance to antimalarials, there is a need for innovative methods of Plasmodium treatment. Recent evidence has pointed to a role of the composition of the gut microbiota in the severity of Plasmodium infection in both animal models and human studies. Further evidence has shown that the gut microbiota influences the adaptive immune response of the host, the arm of the immune system necessary for Plasmodium clearance, sustained Plasmodium immunity, and va...
Source: Current Opinion in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Microbiol Source Type: research
In conclusion, PvMSP1-42 of Indonesian isolates displayed allelic polymorphisms caused by mutation, recombination, and positive selection. These results will aid the understanding of the P. vivax population in Indonesia and to develop a PvMSP1 based vaccine against P. vivax. PMID: 32987191 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
We present advances in modeling techniques that have led to fundamental disease discoveries and impacted clinical translation.Recent FindingsCombining mechanistic models and machine learning algorithms has led to improvements in the treatment ofShigella and tuberculosis through the development of novel compounds. Modeling of the epidemic dynamics of malaria at the within-host and between-host level has afforded the development of more effective vaccination and antimalarial therapies. Similarly, in-host and host-host models have supported the development of new HIV treatment modalities and an improved understanding of the i...
Source: Current Pathobiology Reports - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
This article focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child health in sub-Saharan Africa. We review the epidemiology of major pediatric diseases and, referencing modeling projections, discuss the short- and long-term impact of the pandemic on major disease control. We deliberate on potential complications of SARS-CoV-2 co-infections/co-morbidities and identify critical social and ethical issues. Furthermore, we highlight the paucity of COVID-19 data and clinical trials in this region and the lack of child participants in ongoing studies. Lastly, approaches and interventions to mitigate the pandemic's impact on chi...
Source: Pediatric Research - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Res Source Type: research
A, Sing'oei V, Sirima SB, Sylla K, Tine R, Tiono AB, Tivura M, Usuf E, Wéry S Abstract RTS,S/AS01E malaria vaccine safety, effectiveness, and impact will be assessed in pre- and post-vaccine introduction studies, comparing the occurrence of malaria cases and adverse events in vaccinated versus unvaccinated children. Because those comparisons may be confounded by potential year-to-year fluctuations in malaria transmission intensity and malaria control intervention usage, the latter should be carefully monitored to adequately adjust the analyses. This observational cross-sectional study is assessing Plasmodi...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
Abstract U.S. residents traveling internationally to regions with increased risk of infectious diseases infrequently seek pretravel health care. First- and second-generation immigrants traveling to their countries of origin and visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) have increased risk of certain infectious diseases and are more likely to participate in high-risk activities. In an online survey of 994 U.S. residents with two foreign-born parents who went on at least one international trip to an at-risk country (defined as having a typhoid vaccine recommendation) in the prior 3 years, respondents were questioned abo...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
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