Diabetes and Dementia Risk

Over the past several years I have been calling attention to the profound relationship that exists between elevation of blood sugar and risk for developing dementia. This evolving body of knowledge stems from the incontrovertible evidence linking risk for dementia with having diabetes. More compelling is the evidence that demonstrates that this relationship becomes even more dramatic based on the length of time a person has suffered from diabetes. To be sure, I’m talking about type 2 diabetes which now affects about 28.6 million Americans. This is the type of diabetes that, in most people, is directly reflective of dietary and other lifestyle choices like exercise, stress reduction and getting enough sleep. In this report from the Journal of the American Medical Association, Dr. Rosebud Roberts, of the Mayo Clinic, whose work I have cited before, demonstrated a profoundly increased risk for developing dementia in elderly individuals who became diabetic before the age of 65, as well as in those who had been diabetic for 10 years or longer. Here’s the take home message: you can absolutely and dramatically reduce your risk for becoming a diabetic today by changing your diet to one that includes much fewer carbs and sugars and reintroduces healthful fats back to the table. In addition, regular aerobic exercise will help to reduce diabetes risk, and, as such, go a long way to helping you avert dementia. For more information, order your copy of Grain...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - Category: Neurologists Authors: Tags: Grain Brain Nutrition Science blood sugar Dementia diabetes exercise stress type 2 Type 2 diabetes Source Type: blogs

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By the time Janet Johnson’s father reached his mid-80s, he was on so many medications their names are now impossible to recall. There were pills for managing his cholesterol, blood pressure, and asthma, says Johnson, an administrative assistant who lives near Minneapolis. Other drugs helped with his sleep problems and treated his type 2 diabetes. There were more, too, but who can remember? One thing was certain though: As the number of prescriptions increased, his health seemed to get worse. Continue reading on HealthCentral to learn more about how too many medications can cause more harm than good - particularly for...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractIntroductionA recent study demonstrated that large glucose fluctuations were associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and acute myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether glucose fluctuations are related to the incidence of CVD or the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with T2DM with no apparent history of CVD. In this protocol, we will be investigating the relationships of glucose fluctuations evaluated by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to the incidence of composite cardiovascular events and the progression of at...
Source: Diabetes Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
By the time Janet Johnson’s father reached his mid-80s, he was on so many medications their names are now impossible to recall. There were pills for managing his cholesterol, blood pressure, and asthma, says, Johnson, an administrative assistant who lives near Minneapolis. Other drugs helped with his sleep problems and treated his type 2 diabetes. There were more, too, but who can remember? One thing was certain though: As the number of prescriptions increased, his health seemed to get worse. Read the full article on HealthCentral to learn more from this geriatrician about why too many medications might be bad for an...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
By the time Janet Johnson’s father reached his mid-80s, he was on so many medications their names are now impossible to recall. There were pills for managing his cholesterol, blood pressure, and asthma, says, Johnson, an administrative assistant who lives near Minneapolis. Other drugs helped with his sleep problems and treated his type 2 diabetes. There were more, too, but who can remember? One thing was certain though: As the number of prescriptions increased, his health seemed to get worse. Read the full article on HealthCentral to learn more from this geriatrician about why too many medications might be bad for an...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Personalized Medicine UniverseAuthor(s): Minako Abe, Hiroyuki AbeAbstractLifestyle-related chronic illnesses, such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and dementia are rising at an alarming, epidemic rate. In this modern world of increasing lifespan, we are actually decreasing our health span, placing an undue burden on healthcare costs to society. Modern medicine has largely gotten away from addressing key issues to prevent or even reverse some of these chronic conditions. Yet the evidence for successful interventions in four key areas – nutrition, s...
Source: Personalized Medicine Universe - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
This study provides a possible reason why genes carrying health risks have persisted in human populations. The second found evidence for multiple variants in genes related to ageing that exhibited antagonistic pleiotropic effects. They found higher risk allele frequencies with large effect sizes for late-onset diseases (relative to early-onset diseases) and an excess of variants with antagonistic effects expressed through early and late life diseases. There also exists other recent tangible evidence of antagonistic pleiotropy in specific human genes. The SPATA31 gene has been found under strong positive genomic sele...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
By Arman Azad, CNN (CNN) — If you’re sitting down while reading this, stand up. Guidelines released Monday by the federal government show that most Americans are not getting the exercise they need, costing the health care system over $100 billion each year. The new standards are similar to those released 10 years ago, but the government is scrapping a recommendation that physical activity occur in 10-minute blocks, instead telling Americans to “move more and sit less” whenever possible. Any amount of exercise has some health benefits, officials say, and some benefits are even immediate, like better ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Exercise Source Type: news
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