A Tale of Two Clinics

This is a tale of two academic gender clinics -- for one it is the best of times, for the other, the worst. I will start with the worst -- not only the worst of times, but the worst gender clinic in North America -- at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Gender Identity Clinic (GIC) is being closed by the Province of Ontario, after an investigation which led to the dismissal of the clinic's gender identity director, Kenneth Zucker. Dr. Zucker has long been considered by his peers as one of the leading experts in transgender medicine, so much so that he, a psychologist from Canada, was put in charge of the revision of the gender identity section of the psychiatric bible, the DSM 5. (For those who may be unaware, psychiatrists are medical doctors, while psychologists have done advanced professional work in psychology. Sometimes they get along; at other times they do not). The clinic review was done for the province by independent experts, long after trans health advocates had made the CAMH (also known as "Jurassic Clarke," after its previous name, the Clarke Institute) the poster child of trans conversion therapy. This past year has seen a number of states pass laws banning conversion therapy, years after multiple medical associations had proclaimed conversion therapy harmful to LGBT persons, and this trend was joined by none other than the White House. In other words, it was about time. The review stated, among many conclusions...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Abstract BACKGROUND: Opioids are effective analgesics in the management of chronic pain. However, their clinical use is hindered by adverse side effects such as addiction and analgesic tolerance. Naringenin is a common polyphenolic constituent of the citrus fruits and is one of the most commonly consumed flavonoids within our regular diet. However, its influences on opioid tolerance and addiction have not yet been clarified. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of different doses of naringenin on analgesic tolerance, conditioned place preference and neuroinflammation in morphine-exposed rats. METHODS: Analg...
Source: The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse Source Type: research
Digital media&downloads Pain Relief Caused by SARS-CoV-2 Infection May Help Explain COVID-19 Spread New research shows SARS-CoV-2 promotes pain relief when it infects cells through a common protein receptor, neuropilin-1. The finding gives scientists a novel target for non-opioid pain therapeutics, while also offering an explanation for the unrelenting spread of COVID-19. Stacy Pigott Today University of Arizona Health SciencesKhanna_Raj_klh3067.jpg Doctoral student Lisa Boinon prepares buffers while Rajesh Khanna looks on. (Photo: Kris Hanning/University of Arizona Health Sciences)HealthCollege of Medicine - Tuc...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Hassaballa D, Harvey RL Abstract The management of pain in persons with neurological injuries is challenging and complex. A holistic view and clinical approach are necessary when addressing pain in patients with neurological impairment because interpreting signs and symptoms and deciphering sources of pain is never a straightforward process. This problem is further magnified with the management of central pain syndromes. The best approach is to have a good understanding of the clinical characteristics commonly found in this patient population, in particular for patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS)...
Source: NeuroRehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: NeuroRehabilitation Source Type: research
Walter OlsonLast week theSixth Circuit rejected a federal judge ’s novel certification of an unusual “negotiating class” aimed at promoting a global settlement between opiate manufacturers and cities and counties around the country that have sued them. The designated class would have included thousands of cities and counties around the country that have not filed suit, and the way in which it would have handled their legal interests was assailed from many directions as lacking in fairness. Last week ’s ruling triumphantly vindicates the prescience of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsbu...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Can people with schizophrenia fall in love? Can they date or even get married? In today’s episode, host Rachel Star Withers (a woman who lives with schizophrenia) and co-host Gabe Howard review their own past romantic experiences. They also interview Andrew and Stephanie Downing, authors of Marriage and Schizophrenia: Eyes on the Prize. Listen to learn about their incredible journey of overcoming schizophrenia and building a healthy, rewarding, and happy marriage. Computer Generated Transcript of “Love, Dating, Marriage with Schizophrenia” Episode Editor’s Note: Please be mindful that this trans...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Marriage and Divorce Motivation and Inspiration Podcast Relationships Sexuality Source Type: blogs
umdar Achieving effective pain management is one of the major challenges associated with modern day medicine. Opioids, such as morphine, have been the reference treatment for moderate to severe acute pain not excluding chronic pain modalities. Opioids act through the opioid receptors, the family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate pain relief through both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Four types of opioid receptors have been described, including the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), κ-opioid receptor (KOR), δ-opioid receptor (DOR), and the nociceptin opioid peptide recept...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
This week is Te Wiki o te Maori – and the theme is Kia Kaha te Reo Maori. For those readers not familiar with te reo, kia kaha translates to “be strong.” It’s a word people from Otautahi (Christchurch) have used a lot since 2010 and the first of the many events that have shaken (literally) our world since then. Te Wiki o te Maori is a week dedicated to celebrating and strengthening the use of Maori language in New Zealand. While the week celebrates the language of Aotearoa, it also helps us tangata tiriti, or people of the Treaty of Waitangi, remember that we have a place in this whenua (land). ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Pain conditions Professional topics Research Resilience/Health Science in practice respect values Source Type: blogs
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Fall 2020 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities NIH/HHS News Funding Notices Science Advances Subscribe to NICDR News Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR Announces Availability of COVID-19 Research Funding On May 5, NIDCR issued two Notices of Special Interest highlighting the urgent need for research on coronavirus disease 2019. This research may be conducted either via the National Dental PBRN infrastructu...
Source: NIDCR Science News - Category: Dentistry Source Type: news
Studies have shown that narcotic substance addiction has been on a rise across all patient populations, including pediatrics. Narcotics have long been used in complex spine surgeries as a measure of pain control, and are often given in the form of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) during postoperative recovery as well as take-home medication.
Source: The Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
Since 2000, the annual death toll from opioid associated overdose has increased by over 300%. To reduce the opioid consumption, physicians have used alternative approaches, which have proven to not only be effective, but also reduce the side effects such as nausea, constipation, and addiction. IV acetaminophen has been shown to successfully accomplish the reduction in opioid use, however, it is an expensive alternative. Testing the efficacy of IV acetaminophen vs its oral formulation will likely modify future postoperative pain management regimens while also addressing cost-effectiveness.
Source: The Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Academia | Addiction | African Health | Back Pain | Child Development | Children | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Health | Internet | John Hopkins University | Legislation | Men | Pain | Psychiatry | Psychology | Science | Study | Websites | Women