Nigeria: NACA Takes HIV Testing to Lagos, Nasarawa

[Guardian] Abuja/Lagos -The National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) will today conclude a four day free medical screening programme consisting of HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT), test for diabetes, hypertension and malaria as well as deworming for children Awofeso Olaleye Market in Shomolu Local Government Area (LGA) of Lagos State.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractThirty years ago, chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity accounted for less than 45% of the global disease burden. Today, they are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide, having surpassed infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and malaria. We have understood for decades the roles of ‘classical’ risk factors including elevated LDL-cholesterol, hypertension, elevated blood glucose, and smoking in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. More recent research is continuing to define the contribution of other emerging factors to the risk of developing cardiovascular di...
Source: Internal and Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Cabinet Secretary Sicily Kariuki pushing hard for UHC in Kenya. Credit: MOH KenyaBy Felipe Jaramillo and Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya, Mar 27 2019 (IPS) Consider this. One million Kenyans fall into poverty every year due to catastrophic out of pocket health expenditures. For the almost four in every five Kenyans who lack access to medical insurance, the fear that they are just an accident or serious illness away from destitution. Ill health is easily the most destructive wrecking-ball to any country’s plans for sustainable development, which validates President Uhuru Kenyatta’s commitment to deliver Univ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Featured Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news
Cabinet Secretary Sicily Kariuki pushing hard for UHC in Kenya. Credit: MOH KenyaBy Felipe Jaramillo and Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya, Mar 27 2019 (IPS) Consider this. One million Kenyans fall into poverty every year due to catastrophic out of pocket health expenditures. For the almost four in every five Kenyans who lack access to medical insurance, the fear that they are just an accident or serious illness away from destitution. Ill health is easily the most destructive wrecking-ball to any country’s plans for sustainable development, which validates President Uhuru Kenyatta’s commitment to deliver Univ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Featured Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news
Tristate Heart and Vascular Centre in Nigeria. Credit: Tristate Heart and Vascular CentreBy Pavithra Rao, Africa Renewal*NEW YORK, Sep 28 2017 (IPS)In the 2017 World Happiness Report by Gallup, African countries score poorly. Of the 150 countries on the list, the Central African Republic, Tanzania and Burundi rank as the unhappiest countries in the world. Some of the factors driving unhappiness are the poor state of the continent’s health care systems, the persistence of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and the growth of lifestyle diseases such as hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.Few African countries make...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
A disaster in slow motion; that is how Dr Githinji Gitahi, CEO of African health NGO AMREF, describes the threat of non-communicable diseases (NCDs).Long thought of as diseases of the richer countries, the threat of NCDs – including cancer, diabetes and hypertension – is growing in low-to-middle-income countries, which now account for three-quarters of the annual death toll of more than 40 million.A toxic mix of modernization, urbanization and lifestyle changes has seen this growth in NCDs in developing countries, a scenario that has already played out in developed countries, where smoking, alcohol, processed f...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Elected village leaders successfully planned and conducted a 6-day multi-disease health campaign with service provision by local clinic staff that reached over half of a rural Ugandan community. These data suggest it is feasible for local leaders and clinics to adopt a multi-disease health campaign approach to scale-up HIV testing in rural Africa. PMID: 28406269 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the International AIDS Society - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: J Int AIDS Soc Source Type: research
[This Day] Abuja -A new report entitled: 'Dissemination of Research Findings Programme Agenda and Analysis of Non-Communicable Diseases Prevention Policies in Africa' inaugurated by African health scientists said deaths from non-communicable diseases, particularly, cancer, stroke, diabetes, hypertension among others will increase in Nigeria in the next seven years.
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Conclusions The way forward is to improve maternal and child care, promote screening of at-risk populations, and develop strategies for primary prevention and early intervention to optimize glycemic control. Greater commitment to health care by the government and nongovernmental organizations and greater awareness by Nigerians should facilitate the desired improvements in disease prevention and glycemic control in those who are already affected.
Source: Annals of Global Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
Conclusions Patterns of disease are changing rapidly in LMICs. Pollution-related chronic diseases are becoming more common. This shift presents a particular problem for children, who are proportionately more heavily exposed than are adults to environmental pollutants and for whom these exposures are especially dangerous. Better quantification of environmental exposures and stepped-up efforts to understand how to prevent exposures that cause disease are needed in LMICs and around the globe. To confront the global problem of disease caused by pollution, improved programs of public health monitoring and environmental protecti...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Brief Communication March 2016 Source Type: research
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