Mary O.

I’ve heard many responses from folks who have read Grain Brain, but to know that I brought tears to someone’s eyes is incredibly humbling. – Dr. Perlmutter I live in Australia and, by chance, came across Grain Brain whilst browsing iBooks for a good summer read. Once I got over the shock of the scientific revelations of your findings, I did three things: I cried with relief: I finally had some answers as to why my health was deteriorating in recent years (I am a 50 year old who exercises and followed a low fat/carb diet). I collected all my statins and hypertensive medication and threw them in the bin. Next, I cleared my pantry of all sugary foodstuffs along with anything containing gluten. As I was doing all this, it suddenly occurred to me why a recent holiday to Sri Lanka had left me feeling “normal” and refreshed: it was because I was eating good oils and detoxing spices and had not touched wheat for two weeks! It takes a couple of days to adjust to no sugar, but two weeks into your lifestyle plan, I feel a lot better and feel I am coming back to my natural self with good energy levels and deep sleep. And, without even intending for it to happen, the spare tire around my middle is shrinking. I am horrified that I was contributing to the demise of my brain and thank you once again, from the bottom of my heart, for helping thousands of people avoid premature aging and degeneration. -Mary O. The post Mary O. appeared first on D...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - Category: Neurologists Authors: Tags: Success eneergy Hypertension Medication Sleep Statins sugar weight loss wheat Source Type: blogs

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Hey Athletes: My colleague, Professor Rachel Lampert, from Yale, along with the StopAF.org patient group, seek to learn more about how atrial fibrillation (AF) and its treatments affect athletic people. If you are an athlete or if you regularly exercise vigorously, please give the Yale researchers a few moments of your time. Here is the link to the survey. Since I had AF in the past, I filled it out. It takes only a few minutes. Prof. Lampert’s research into this area is important because AF affects people in vastly different ways. It’s weird; while most AF stems from advanced age or lifestyle...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Embolism associated with asymptomatic carotid stenosis shows circadian variation with highest rates 4–6 h before midday. This corresponds with peak circadian incidence of stroke and other vascular complications. These and ASED Study results show that monitoring frequency, duration, and time of day are important in ES detection. Introduction Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detected microembolism in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) may help stratify the risk of stroke and other arterial disease complications in persons with advanced (≥60%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis. If so, this techniqu...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
When Tom Shicowich’s toe started feeling numb in 2010, he brushed it off as a temporary ache. At the time, he didn’t have health insurance, so he put off going to the doctor. The toe became infected, and he got so sick that he stayed in bed for two days with what he assumed was the flu. When he finally saw a doctor, the physician immediately sent Shicowich to the emergency room. Several days later, surgeons amputated his toe, and he ended up spending a month in the hospital to recover. Shicowich lost his toe because of complications of Type 2 diabetes as he struggled to keep his blood sugar under control. He wa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health Nutrition Source Type: news
Evidence Supporting Three Interventions That Might Slow Cognitive Decline and the Onset of Dementia Is Encouraging but Insufficient to Justify a Public Health Campaign Focused on Their Adoption (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine): “Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, E...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Professional Development Acetylcholinesterase antidementia treatments biomarkers blood pressure management cognitive-decline Cognitive-impairment Cognitive-Training Source Type: blogs
It’s so hard to remember to take your medicine, let alone take it correctly (with food, on an empty stomach, not at the same time as other things you’re taking, at night, without grapefruit juice… the list seems endless). There are so many barriers and distractions that can get in the way. Many people aren’t thrilled about having to take medications because they worry about side effects, or they’re having side effects, or they just don’t like the idea of needing to take medicine. If it’s for prevention, like aspirin to prevent strokes, or to treat an “invisible” condit...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Drugs and Supplements Managing your health care Source Type: blogs
By MICHEL ACCAD, MD Jim was at his desk, looking weary. The last few weeks had been brutal.  Despite working twelve-hour days, he felt that he had little to show for it.  His annual board meeting was to take place the next day, and he expected it to be tense. With a replacement bill for the ACA about to be voted on, and with Trump in the White House, the situation seemed particularly precarious.  The board members had asked him to present a contingency plan, in case things in DC didn’t go well. As CEO of a major health insurance company, Jim was well aware that business as usu...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized AHCA health reform MICHEL ACCAD repeal and replace Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 2 May 2017 Source:The Lancet Author(s): Ajay Gupta, David Thompson, Andrew Whitehouse, Tim Collier, Bjorn Dahlof, Neil Poulter, Rory Collins, Peter Sever Background In blinded randomised controlled trials, statin therapy has been associated with few adverse events (AEs). By contrast, in observational studies, larger increases in many different AEs have been reported than in blinded trials. Methods In the Lipid-Lowering Arm of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial, patients aged 40–79 years with hypertension, at least three other cardiovascular risk factors, and fasting tota...
Source: The Lancet - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
This article reviews the current recommendations for the management of each of these modifiable risk factors. Recent Findings: It has been documented that some blood pressure medications may increase variability of blood pressure and ultimately increase the risk for stroke. Stroke prevention typically includes antiplatelet therapy (unless an indication for anticoagulation exists), so the most recent evidence supporting use of these drugs is reviewed. In addition, emerging risk factors, such as obstructive sleep apnea, electronic cigarettes, and elevated lipoprotein (a), are discussed. Summary: Overall, secondary stroke p...
Source: CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
New details, possible treatment in the link between heart disease and sleep apnea People with obstructive sleep apnea are at significantly increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The relationship between the two conditions is complex, and the mechanisms by which they may trigger or exacerbate one another are not yet well understood. But the fundamental connection between OSA and cardiovascular disease is strong. Studies indicated that obstructive sleep apnea is 2-3 times more prevalent among people with cardiovascular disease than those without. Research shows that the mortality rate for cardiovascular disease is hig...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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