TWiV 364: It’s not SARS 2.0

On episode #364 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent, Rich, and Kathy speak with Ralph Baric and Vineet Menachery about their research on the potential of SARS-like bat coronaviruses  to infect human cells and cause disease in mice. You can find TWiV #364 at www.twiv.tv.
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: This Week in Virology bat coronavirus gain of function host range infectious viral DNA MERS pathogenesis SARS spike glycoprotein tropism viruses zoonoses zoonosis Source Type: blogs

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A rapidly evolving health story broke in late December when a novel illness originating in Wuhan, China made the news. Reports of the number of infected people swiftly rose, and isolated cases of this new coronavirus — dubbed 2019-nCoV by scientists — have appeared in several countries due to international travel. At this writing, almost 1,300 confirmed cases and over 40 deaths have occurred in China, according to an article in the New York Times. Fortunately, public health officials in many countries, including the US, have put measures in place to help prevent further spread of the virus. These measures inclu...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
This reporter was once served slices of sashimi still attached to the carcass of a gasping fish.) Eating wild animals is also considered a luxury because of their rarity and cost, much like game is in the West. Some practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine also believe that eating exotic creatures can cure certain ailments and boost “male potency.” “This is just part of Chinese culture,” says Yanzhong Huang, a public heath expert at the Council for Foreign Relations. “They love to eat anything alive.” Wild animals are, of course, especially problematic because their murky provenienc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news
BOSTON (CBS/CNN) – A new Chinese coronavirus, a cousin of the SARS virus, has infected more than 200 people since the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December. Boston’s Logan Airport is not currently screening passengers for the illness, a spokesman for Customs and Border Protection told WBZ-TV. That’s because there are no direct flights to Boston from that region. Additional health screening for coronavirus is in place at JFK Airport in New York, San Francisco International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport. The agency said the CDC has determined that coronavirus presents a low risk to the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Coronavirus Logan Airport Source Type: news
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 1/10/2020. The main aim of this five-page national capacities review tool is to better understand existing capacities in the area of detection and response to a novel coronavirus (nCoV) that is zoonotic and causes respiratory disease. The tool was developed with other coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, in mind and in consultation with member states. This information will help national authorities to identify main gaps, perform risk assessments, and plan for additional investigations, response, and control actions. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
A new coronavirus appears to be causing a pneumonia-like illness in China. It is certainly a zoonotic infection – jumping from non-human animals to humans – as exemplified by previous outbreaks of SARS and MERS coronaviruses. The government in Wuhan, China confirmed on 31 December that dozens of cases of pneumonia of unknown cause were […]
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Basic virology Information coronavirus emerging virus MERS pneumonia respiratory disease SARS viral viruses Wuhan outbreak zoonosis Source Type: blogs
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 1/9/2020. The main aim of this five-page tool is to better understand existing capacities in the area of detection and response to a novel coronavirus (nCoV) that is zoonotic and causes respiratory disease. The tool was developed with other coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, in mind and in consultation with member states. This information will help national authorities to identify main gaps, perform risk assessments, and plan for additional investigations, response, and control actions. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 1/2020. A novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) was identified by Chinese authorities on January 7, 2020. Available evidence on the 2019-nCoV virus and previous experience with other coronavirus (MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV) and other respiratory viruses (e.g., avian influenza) suggest that there may be zoonotic transmission associated with the 2019-nCoV. This web page provides the World Health Organization's general recommendations, and recommendations for at-risk groups, regarding live animal markets to reduce risk of transmission of emerging pathogens. (Text)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Publication date: 2019Source: Advances in Virus Research, Volume 105Author(s): M. Alejandra Tortorici, David VeeslerAbstractCoronaviruses (CoVs) have caused outbreaks of deadly pneumonia in humans since the beginning of the 21st century. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in 2002 and was responsible for an epidemic that spread to five continents with a fatality rate of 10% before being contained in 2003 (with additional cases reported in 2004). The Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and has caused recurrent outbreaks in humans w...
Source: Advances in Virus Research - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 August 2019Source: Advances in Virus ResearchAuthor(s): M. Alejandra Tortorici, David VeeslerAbstractCoronaviruses (CoVs) have caused outbreaks of deadly pneumonia in humans since the beginning of the 21st century. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in 2002 and was responsible for an epidemic that spread to five continents with a fatality rate of 10% before being contained in 2003 (with additional cases reported in 2004). The Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and has caused recurrent outbre...
Source: Advances in Virus Research - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Abstract Human coronavirus (HCoV) infection causes respiratory diseases with mild to severe outcomes. In the last 15 years, we have witnessed the emergence of two zoonotic, highly pathogenic HCoVs: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Replication of HCoV is regulated by a diversity of host factors and induces drastic alterations in cellular structure and physiology. Activation of critical signaling pathways during HCoV infection modulates the induction of antiviral immune response and contributes to the pathogenesis of HCoV. Recent st...
Source: Annual Review of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Annu Rev Microbiol Source Type: research
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