Possible new way to fight lung infections

Check out this article. http://www.spiritindia.com/health-ca...cles-7534.html A study done in collaboration with the University of Washington found that using a metallic "Trojan Horse" - tricking the bacteria by replacing the iron they need from their environment with the metallic element gallium - can ki ll bacteria. The study will appear in the April 2 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The UC team headed by Bradley Britigan, MD, chairman of the internal medicine department at UC and staff physician at the Cincinnati Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, found substituting gallium for iron would prevent the bacteria from growing. "All bacteria need iron from their host environment to grow and replicate," said Britigan, coauthor of the study. "Without enough iron, the organism has a much more difficult time forming 'biofilms,' protective skins that form around colonies of bacteria and help them maintain chronic infections." Rather than trying to find a new way to attack and ki ll off bacteria, researchers used gallium, which resembles iron but cannot be used by bacteria, to create an inhospitable environment. "Cells take up gallium as they would iron and insert it into enzymes," said Britigan. "But when they do this, the enzymes stop working and the bacteria don't grow." In both cell cultures and in mice, the gallium treatment ki lled bacteria and prevented the formation of biofilms. ...
Source: Cystic Fibrosis Alternative Medicine Forum - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Alternative Medicine Source Type: forums

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Publication date: Available online 8 November 2019Source: Respiratory InvestigationAuthor(s): Lucia Vietri, Annalisa Fui, Laura Bergantini, Miriana d’Alessandro, Paolo Cameli, Piersante Sestini, Paola Rottoli, Elena BargagliAbstractSerum amyloid A is an acute-phase protein with multiple immunological functions. Serum amyloid A is involved in lipid metabolism, inflammatory reactions, granuloma formation, and cancerogenesis. Additionally, serum amyloid A is involved in the pathogenesis of different autoimmune lung diseases. The levels of serum amyloid A has been evaluated in biological fluids of patients with different...
Source: Respiratory Investigation - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
This review presents and discusses a new frontier for fast, risk-free and potentially inexpensive diagnostics of respiratory diseases by detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in exhaled breath. One part of the review is a didactic presentation of the overlaying concept and the chemistry of exhaled breath. The other part discusses diverse sensors that have been developed and used for the detection of respiratory diseases (e.g. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, lung cancer, pulmonary arterial hypertension, tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and pneumoconiosis) by analy...
Source: European Respiratory Review - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Pulmonary pharmacology and therapeutics Review Source Type: research
Santosh K. Ghosh1*, Thomas S. McCormick1,2 and Aaron Weinberg1* 1Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States 2Dermatology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States Human beta-defensins (hBDs, −1, 2, 3) are a family of epithelial cell derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that protect mucosal membranes from microbial challenges. In addition to their antimicrobial activities, they possess other functions; e.g., cell activation, proliferation, regulation of cytokine/chemokine production, migration, diffe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion Microorganisms are involved in many life activities, and affect their surrounding environment and other organisms. Microorganisms play important roles in human heath, crop growth, livestock farming, environmental management, industrial chemical production and food production. In the 19th century, people first observed microbes using microscopes and began to study them. However, the development of high-throughput sequencing technology has led to generation of large amounts of microbial related data. As a result, machine-learning methods are now being applied to microbiological research. Here, we discuss the curr...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study we found blocking autophagy led to increased CP growth in both macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In vivo, loss of the autophagy elongation component ATG16L1 specifically in myeloid cells led to increased mortality in response to CP infection, characterized by greater numbers of neutrophils and dendritic cells, but no change in the CP burden in the lungs. This was accompanied by an increase in inflammasome-active macrophages and IL-1β production. While induction of autophagy in macrophages led to reduced CP growth in vitro, in vivo treatment with rapamycin led to increased mortality of infected...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study they also showed PTX3 localized in NETs formed after neutrophil activation (5). Proteomics analysis revealed that PTX3 forms complexes with two anti-microbial proteins [azurocidin (AZU1) and myeloperoxidase (MPO)] associated to NETs (30). More recently, PTX3 localization in NETs has been confirmed, and the colocalization with AZU1 and MPO has been defined more accurately (31). Further investigation will be needed to understand the involvement of PTX3 interaction with AZU1 and MPO in their antibacterial role during NET formation. Regulation of Complement Activation PTX3 interaction with microorganisms is not...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Mur LA, Huws SA, Cameron SJ, Lewis PD, Lewis KE Abstract The lung microbiome has been shown to reflect a range of pulmonary diseases-for example: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. Studies have now begun to show microbiological changes in the lung that correlate with lung cancer (LC) which could provide new insights into lung carcinogenesis and new biomarkers for disease screening. Clinical studies have suggested that infections with tuberculosis or pneumonia increased the risk of LC possibly through inflammatory or immunological changes. These have now been supersede...
Source: Ecancermedicalscience - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Ecancermedicalscience Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: These results demonstrated the high frequency of M. fortuitum in respiratory samples and that this bacterium causes transient infection or colonization in patients with underlying pulmonary conditions, such as cystic fibrosis and cigarette smoking-induced. Additionally, it appears that infection with M. fortuitum is particularly common and may be important in patients with HIV. PMID: 30052175 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Conclusions: Peroral arsenic has little effect on local airway immune responses to bacteria but compromises respiratory epithelial barrier integrity, increasing systemic translocation of inhaled pathogens and small molecules. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1878 Received: 09 March 2017 Revised: 14 August 2017 Accepted: 16 August 2017 Published: 28 September 2017 Address correspondence to M.B. Fessler, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Dr., P.O. Box 12233, Maildrop D2-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA. Telephone: (919) 541-3701. Email: fesslerm@niehs.nih.gov *Current address: UN...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells characterised by their potential to control T-cell responses and to dampen inflammation. While the role of MDSCs in cancer has been studied in depth, our understanding of their relevance for infectious and inflammatory disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Recent studies highlight an emerging and complex role for MDSCs in pulmonary diseases. In this review, we discuss the potential contribution of MDSCs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in lung diseases, particularly lung cancer, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cystic fibrosis.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Mechanisms of lung disease Back to Basics Source Type: research
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