Cancer survivor to run marathon.

Cancer survivor to run marathon. Nurs Stand. 2014 Feb 26;28(26):9 Authors: Abstract Oncology nurse Mandy Holdsworth has recovered from bowel cancer - and is now in training for the London Marathon to raise money for the charity Beating Bowel Cancer. PMID: 24568382 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Nursing Standard - Category: Nursing Tags: Nurs Stand Source Type: research

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UK researchers looked at more than 120,000 individuals having a colonoscopy, the main test for colorectal cancer, in England between 2005 and 2013.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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(University of Leeds) A colonoscopy is the main test used to detect bowel cancer, but like most tests, it is not always 100% accurate and cancers can be missed.
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In conclusion, two molecular subtypes have been consistently identified in our series of CD-SBCs, a microsatellite instability-immune and a mesenchymal subtype, the former likely associated with an indolent and the latter with a worse tumor behavior.
Source: Virchows Archiv - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
BOWEL cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK and the second biggest cancer killer. Symptoms of the disease can be subtle and doesn ’t necessarily make a person feel ill. But having a certain colour stools could signal the deadly disease.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
New research uses Mendelian randomization and genetic data to study potential causal relations between certain types of gut bacteria and bowel cancer.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Colorectal Cancer Source Type: news
A Bristol University paper studying how someone's gut bacteria could affect their health found that people with more of a certain type - named Bacteroidales - were more likely to get bowel cancer.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
People who have a certain type of bacteria in their guts may be at greater risk of developing bowel cancer. The findings will be presented by University of Bristol researcher, Dr Kaitlin Wade, at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow today [Monday 4 November].
Source: University of Bristol news - Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research, International; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Institutes, Elizabeth Blackwell; Press Release Source Type: news
Study shows people with more Bacteroidales bacteria may have up to 15% more risk of diseaseBacteria in the gut might influence the chance of developing bowel cancer, research suggests, in the latest study to link human health to the microbes within.The gutmicrobiome– the collection of fungi, bacteria and viruses within our gut – is a booming topic of research, with scientists suggesting certain microbial makeups could be linked to conditions ranging from anxiety to obesity.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Cancer research Science Health Society Microbiology Medical research UK news Source Type: news
People with an unclassified type of Bacteroidales bacteria in their guts may be at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer Related items fromOnMedica Invest in workforce to roll out bowel cancer screening, urges former health secretary Bowel cancer screening tests exceed target set in Scotland Taking aspirin with a PPI reduces risk of oesophageal cancer FOB associated with rise in all-cause mortality Screening for colorectal cancer should start at 45 years
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
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