Community Integration and Quality of Life in Aphasia after Stroke.

CONCLUSION: Community activities of PWA were very limited, and depression was highly associated with decreased community integration and QOL. Enhancing social participation and reducing emotional distress should be emphasized for rehabilitation of PWA. PMID: 26446656 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Yonsei Medical Journal - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Yonsei Med J Source Type: research

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Shuo Wang, Chun-Xue Wang, Ning Zhang, Yu-Tao Xiang, Yang Yang, Yu-Zhi Shi, Yi-Ming Deng, Mei-Fang Zhu, Fei Liu, Ping Yu, Gabor S. Ungvari, Chee H. Ng
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conditions:   Stroke;   CVA (Cerebrovascular Accident);   CVA; Sequelae;   Stroke, Ischemic;   Stroke Hemorrhagic;   Hemianopia;   Hemiplegia;   Hemiparesis;   Aphasia;   Cerebral Infarction;   Intracerebral Hemorrhage;   Anxiety;   Depression;   Dysphagia;   Dysarthria;   Hemispatial N eglect;   Mild Cognitive Impairment Intervention:   Sponsor:   Aneurin Bevan University Health Board Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
The objective of our study was to investigate the extent to which subjective cognitive complaints predicted community reintegration following a stroke, and whether this relationship would be mediated by emotional status. Methods Using a cross-sectional design, patients with a primary diagnosis of stroke (n = 102; age range 25-89 years) were recruited from the register of a neurological rehabilitation service if they were at least 6 months post-stroke and had been discharged home following the stroke. Exclusions included history of dementia, co-morbid psychiatric or neurological disorder, or significant ...
Source: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Top Stroke Rehabil Source Type: research
ConclusionsIdentifying stroke patients who are eligible for rTMS is essential to accelerate their recovery. rTMS has proven to be safe and effective for treating stroke complications. Functional brain activity can be optimised by applying excitatory or inhibitory electromagnetic pulses to the hemisphere ipsilateral or contralateral to the lesion, respectively, as well as at the level of the transcallosal pathway to regulate interhemispheric communication. Different studies of rTMS in these patients have resulted in improvements in motor disorders, aphasia, dysarthria, oropharyngeal dysphagia, depression, and perceptual-cog...
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
We report 2 longitudinal studies that identified 2 variables at onset that were strongly associated with good recovery of naming (the most common residual deficit in aphasia) in the first 6 months after stroke: damage to left posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) and/or superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus (SLF/AF), and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use. We then tested these variables in 2 independent cohorts of chronic left hemisphere stroke patients, using chi‐square tests and multivariate logistic regression for dichotomous outcomes and t tests for continuous outcomes. ResultsLesion l...
Source: Annals of Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION This is the first reported case demonstrating that EMDR can be effective for depression, even in those with severe expressive aphasia. In our case, there was no reluctance to disclose information, simply a neurological inability to do so. Through preparation, patience, perseverance, and plasticity (clinician flexibility, though perhaps also neuroplasticity), the patient’s PSD gradually improved, and she was able to reinvent her life within her limitations. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors gratefully acknowledge Eugene Schwartz, E.C. Hurley, and Mark Hubner for providing consultation during patient care. REFEREN...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Case Report Current Issue Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Neurology Psychotherapy Stroke aphasia depression EMDR Source Type: research
Dear Colleagues: Welcome to the January-February 2018 issue of Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience (ICNS). This is a milestone year for us as it marks the beginning of our 15th year of publication! We are pleased to continue serving you, our valued readers and colleagues, by providing peer-reviewed, evidence-based information on the latest innovations in both research and clinical practice in the field of neuroscience. We’d like to thank those dedicated readers who have been with us since 2004, the year we launched the journal, and to welcome new readers who are just discovering ICNS and what it has to offer. We&rsq...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Editor's Message: Issue Highlights Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
This study aimed to explore the feasibility of motivational interviewing (MI) in people with post-stroke aphasia. METHODS: In a small-scale feasibility study, consecutive patients admitted to an acute stroke ward were screened for eligibility. People with moderate to severe aphasia were eligible. Those consenting received an intervention consisting of up to eight MI sessions delivered twice per week over four weeks. Sessions were modified using aids and adaptations for aphasia. Session quality was measured using the Motivational Interviewing Skills Code (MISC) to assess MI fidelity. RESULTS: Three consenting pati...
Source: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Top Stroke Rehabil Source Type: research
Conclusions Half the stroke survivors reported fatigue at six months post-stroke. Reduced independence in activities of daily living and higher anxiety levels were associated with the level of fatigue. Persistent and delayed onset fatigue may affect independence and participation in rehabilitation, and these findings should be used to inform the development of appropriate interventions. PMID: 28891760 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Top Stroke Rehabil Source Type: research
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