2015 AAFP-CGHI Malaria review (Mark K Huntington MD, PhD)

Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

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Publication date: 19 November 2019Source: Cell Reports, Volume 29, Issue 8Author(s): Ann Ly, Yang Liao, Halina Pietrzak, Lisa J. Ioannidis, Tom Sidwell, Renee Gloury, Marcel Doerflinger, Tony Triglia, Raymond Z. Qin, Joanna R. Groom, Gabrielle T. Belz, Kim L. Good-Jacobson, Wei Shi, Axel Kallies, Diana S. HansenSummaryDespite the key role that antibodies play in protection, the cellular processes mediating the acquisition of humoral immunity against malaria are not fully understood. Using an infection model of severe malaria, we find that germinal center (GC) B cells upregulate the transcription factor T-bet during infecti...
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
(University of Barcelona) Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) described a mechanism, the increase of proteinaceous synthesis, which takes part in the degeneration of the type of neurons that are affected in Huntington's disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
(Duke University) Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal settings needed to complete a given diagnostic task. In the initial proof-of-concept study, the microscope simultaneously developed a lighting pattern and classification system that allowed it to quickly identify red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite more accurately than trained physicians and other machine learning approaches.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Source: BMJ News - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Clinical manifestation of malaria is mainly due to intra-erythrocytic development of Plasmodium parasites. Plasmodium falciparum merozoites, the invasive form of the blood-stage parasite, invade human erythrocytes in a complex but rapid process. This multi-step progression involves interactions between parasite and human host proteins. Here we show that antibodies against a vaccine antigen, PfGAMA, co-immunoprecipitate with PfMSP10. This interaction was validated as direct by surface plasmon resonance analysis. We then demonstrate that antibodies against PfMSP10 have growth inhibitory activity against cultured parasites, w...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conditions:   Malaria;   Malaria, Asymptomatic Parasitaemia Intervention:   Combination Product: Artemisinin Combination Therapy ACTs Sponsors:   Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research;   World Health Organization Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
An experimental study tests 56 traditional soup broths and finds that some of them contain ingredients that have antimalarial properties.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news
Conditions:   Malaria;   Malaria, Asymptomatic Parasitaemia Intervention:   Combination Product: Artemisinin Combination Therapy ACTs Sponsors:   Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research;   World Health Organization Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Abstract S-Palmitoylation is a uniquely reversible and biologically important post-translational modification as it plays an essential role in a variety of cellular processes including signal transduction, protein-membrane interactions, neuronal development, lipid raft targeting, subcellular localization and apoptosis. Due to its association with the neuronal development, it plays a pivotal role in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, mainly Alzheimer's, Schizophrenia and Huntington's disease. It is also essential for developmental life cycles and pathogenesis of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, kn...
Source: Analytical Biochemistry - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Anal Biochem Source Type: research
Cysteamine has been used for treating cystinosis for many years, and furthermore it has also been used as a therapeutic agent for different diseases including Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, malaria, cancer, and others. Although cysteamine has many potential applications, its use may also be problematic. The effects of low doses of cysteamine on the reproductive system, especially the mammary glands are currently unknown. In the current investigation, low dose (10  mg/kg BW/day) of cysteamine did not affect sheep body weight gain or organ index of the liver, spleen, or...
Source: Theriogenology - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
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