NeuroTribes Explains Autism 'Epidemic'

(MedPage Today) -- Calls for a greater focus on services, particularly for autistic adults
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: news

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The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news
AbstractThe new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is changing how society operates. Environmental changes, disrupted routines, and reduced access to services and social networks will have a unique impact on autistic individuals and their families and will contribute to significant deterioration in some. Access to support is crucial to address vulnerability factors, guide adjustments in home environments, and apply mitigation strategies to improve coping. The current crisis highlights that our regular care systems are not sufficient to meet the needs of the autism communities. In many parts of the world, people have s...
Source: Molecular Autism - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
(Natural News) Despite ongoing increases in the number of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) nationwide, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has consistently failed to declare ASD an epidemic.  This public messaging decision highlights the CDC’s ongoing disregard for prevalence increases over time that support the overriding importance of environmental causes rather...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
 When was the last time you simply enjoyed being in nature? Whether it’s a camping trip to the mountains, a walk in the park or just watching the squirrels from your backyard, being in nature is profoundly healing. In today’s Psych Central Podcast, our guest Richard Louv, a journalist, author and co-founder of the nonprofit Children &Nature Network, discusses the science behind nature’s healing powers. What counts as “nature?” Are pets included? What are some modern barriers to accessing nature, and how can we overcome them? Join us for the answers to these questions and more. SUBSCRIB...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Green and Environment Interview LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
The TWiVerers continue their coverage of the new coronavirus outbreak in China, as the number of cases increase dramatically and the virus begins person-to-person transmission in other countries. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASV 2020 Real time tracking of 2019-nCoV (JHU) Estimation of 2019-nCoV R0 (Int J Inf Dis) WHO Sitreps on 2019-nCoV Coronavirus overtakes SARS (SCMP) HHS press conference Discovery of 201...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
oft Rubella is a systemic virus infection that is usually mild. It can, however, cause severe birth defects known as the congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) when infection occurs early in pregnancy. As many as 8%–13% of children with CRS developed autism during the rubella epidemic of the 1960s compared to the background rate of about 1 new case per 5000 children. Rubella infection and CRS are now rare in the U.S. and in Europe due to widespread vaccination. However, autism rates have risen dramatically in recent decades to about 3% of children today, with many cases appearing after a period of normal developme...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
We are in the midst of a measles epidemic. As of July 25th, more than 1,100 cases have been reported in 30 states since the beginning of the year. That’s the highest number since 1992 — and since measles was declared eliminated in 2000. Given that measles is extremely contagious — the virus can linger in rooms even after a sick person has left — and can lead to serious complications, this is really alarming. There is a simple way to help: get more people immunized. How many children receive vaccines? Most children in the US are immunized. Only a little more than 1% of children have no immunizations....
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) In the 1950s, when autism was not yet a household word, the day’s leading psychiatrists and psychologists propagated the “refrigerator-mother hypothesis.” According to this theory, autism—rare at the time—was the result of emotionally distant mothering. As the condition now known as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) began attaining epidemic proportions (with about 1 in 36 children diagnosed...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Discussion The negative effect of poverty and toxic stress on children born preterm, as depicted by the eco-bio-developmental model, is supported by this analysis. Healthcare providers are encouraged to address the tripartite vulnerability resulting from prematurity, poverty, and toxic stress.
Source: Nursing Research - Category: Nursing Tags: FEATURE ARTICLES Source Type: research
Recent measles epidemics in US and European cities where vaccination coverage has declined are providing a harsh reminder for the need to maintain protective levels of immunity across the entire population. Vaccine uptake rates have been declining in large part because of public misinformation regarding a possible association between measles vaccination and autism for which there is no scientific basis. The purpose of this article is to address a new misinformed antivaccination argument —that measles immunity is undesirable because measles virus is protective against cancer.
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Special article Source Type: research
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