Sierra Leone: 'Malaria, Polio Will Be Key After Ebola'

[Concord] The Deputy Minister of Health and Sanitation has said the ministry would take malaria and polio as top priority after defeating Ebola in the country.
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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Discussion Dengue is an important arboviral infection that affects about 40% of the world population. It is found mainly in topical and subtropical areas of the world mainly in developing countries but it range is spreading including the United States. A review of common arboviruses can be found here. It is a flaviavirus with 4 distinct serotypes named DENV-1 through DENV-4 and is spread by A. aegypti a day biting mosquito. Infection with one serotype confers immunity to that serotype but not the others. It does offer some protection for cross-infection but this only lasts a few months. Incubation period is 3-14 days with ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
A young boy in Pakistan receives an oral polio vaccine (OPV). Over the last 30 years huge progress has been made against polio and it is now only endemic in 2 countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan, with only 33 cases confirmed cases last year. Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, May 1 2019 (IPS) Since the introduction of vaccines, diseases such as measles and polio were quickly becoming a thing of the past. However, the world’s progress on immunisation is now being threatened. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 85 percent of the world’s children received basic va...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse North America Population Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations diptheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) human papillomavirus (HPV) Measles Vaccines World Health Organ Source Type: news
Malaria has plagued humanity for thousands of years. Caused by a tiny parasite transported from person to person by a certain kind of mosquito, the disease poses a risk to nearly half the world’s population. The WHO attempted to eradicate malaria in the 1960s and while it succeeded in ridding many countries of the disease, it fell short of the goal due to growing drug resistance and by failing to focus enough attention on Africa. Every year on World Malaria Day, April 25, the malaria community celebrates progress made to date and focuses on the challenges ahead. This year is especially exciting as just this past Fri...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria World Malaria Day Source Type: news
Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been developed. In the second golden age, the cell culture technology enabled polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines be dev...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Tristate Heart and Vascular Centre in Nigeria. Credit: Tristate Heart and Vascular CentreBy Pavithra Rao, Africa Renewal*NEW YORK, Sep 28 2017 (IPS)In the 2017 World Happiness Report by Gallup, African countries score poorly. Of the 150 countries on the list, the Central African Republic, Tanzania and Burundi rank as the unhappiest countries in the world. Some of the factors driving unhappiness are the poor state of the continent’s health care systems, the persistence of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and the growth of lifestyle diseases such as hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.Few African countries make...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
With cases rising in Florida, Singapore, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago, the Zika virus pandemic is raising public concern in regions across the globe, including the U.S., where about 80 percent of Americans are aware of it but only 40 percent understand how it is actually transmitted. This raises a host of questions not only about the clinical and epidemiological scope of the outbreak, but also about the ability of citizens, public health authorities and politicians at all levels to adequately deal with it.  So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: The PEI-led coordination systems are thus recognized as having made significant contribution to the coordination and delivery of other public health interventions in the African Region. PMID: 27381643 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Aaron Motsoaledi is tired of delivering the same spiel over and over again. No matter how many times the charismatic health minister of South Africa speaks out, people don’t seem to grasp the threat presented by tuberculosis, now the No. 1 infectious killer in the world. “People think it’s a curable disease that’s been there for ages, so what’s new? I think that’s the mentality,” Dr. Motsoaledi told The Huffington Post. As chair of the Stop TB Partnership, a group of public and private leaders hosted through the United Nations Office for Project Service, he has seen the eyes o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Anti-infectious human vaccination in historical perspective. Int Rev Immunol. 2015 Nov 25;:1-32 Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been deve...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
The most important resolution the United Nations ever passed is also the one of the most head-smackingly obvious ones. It’s been in force since Nov. 20, 1959 and in a perfect—or at least better—world, it would not have been necessary at all. It’s the straightforwardly named Declaration of the Rights of the Child, guaranteeing every child on the planet a name and a nationality, the right to “grow old and develop in health,” to be “protected from racial, religious and other forms of discrimination,” and to have, most fundamentally, a happy childhood. So, how’s that going?...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized child brides Children Disease global child mortality health polio UNICEF United Nations vaccines wars Source Type: news
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