Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease (Book Index)
In January, 2018, Academic Press published my bookPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease. This book has an excellent " look inside " at itsGoogle book site, which includes the Table of Contents. In addition, I thought it might be helpful to see the topics listed in the Book's index. Note that page numbers followed by f indicate figures, t indicate tables, and ge indicate glossary terms.AAbandonware, 270, 310geAb initio, 34, 48ge, 108geABL (abelson leukemia) gene, 28, 58ge, 95 –97Absidia corymbifera, 218Acanthameoba, 213Acanthosis nigricans, 144geAchondroplasia, 74, 143ge, 354geAcne, 54ge, 1...
Source: Specified Life - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: index jules berman jules j berman precision medicine Source Type: blogs

A Possible Path to Preventing TDP-43 Aggregation
TDP-43 is known to increase with age, and also forms aggregates observed in ALS and frontemporal dementia, among other conditions. The increased amount of TDP-43 alone, even without aggregates, appears to diminish the cellular housekeeping process of autophagy, with detrimental long term consequences. Artificially reducing the levels of TDP-43 too far will produce other issues, however, as this disrupts correct microglial function in the brain, making the microglia too aggressive when it comes to dismantling synaptic connections between brain cells. Thus building a therapy that targets TDP-43 isn't as straightforward as it...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Indirect Evidence for Misfolded Proteins that Accumulate in Muscle to Contribute to the Progression of Sarcopenia
One of the differences between old tissue and young tissue is an accumulation of misfolded proteins, normally soluable, into solid aggregates. The best known of these are the varieties of amyloid that are clearly associated with specific diseases and are present in significant amounts in patient tissues. These are far from the only proteins that accumulate in such a way, however, and there are many more types of misfolded or damaged proteins that do not form aggregates. Unfortunately the mapping of aggregates by tissue to specific consequences in the course of degenerative aging is far from complete. In the paper I'll poin...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 23, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 61-year-old man with generalized weakness
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 61-year-old man is evaluated for a 10-month history of generalized weakness. He reports no pain or myalgia. History is significant for hypercholesterolemia treated with a stable dose of simvastatin for the past 3 years. On physical examination, temperature is normal, blood pressure is 138/74 mm Hg, pulse rate is 70/min, and respiration rate is 16/min. BMI is 27. There is symmetric weakness of the arm and thigh muscles with slightly reduced grip and power of the finger flexors. No muscle tenderness is n...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 20, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Neurology Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 184
Welcome to the 184th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Here’s an awesome new echo resource from the Nepean Hospital ICU in Penrith, NSW, Australia, containing basic and advanced physics and scanning resources. [SO]   The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Boring EM reviews the relevance o...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 31, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

NIH and Other Public Private Partnerships to Research Treatments for Multiple Diseases
Over the past few weeks, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has made a number of important announcements regarding collaborations with industry as well as the funding of several new research initiatives. Below is a summary of these stories. NIH Partners With Eli Lilly and Others on Rare Diseases FierceBiotechResearch reported that NIH selected four (4) new preclinical drug development studies to uncover new therapies for rare diseases. The projects will be funded through the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program under NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NCATS, which ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 4, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Not exactly fraud
Obviously the cause of science, and therefore the cause of humanity, is harmed when scientists make up results or misrepresent their findings in a scientific paper. I get outraged about it, but it probably isn't all that common.Even so, false beliefs often persist for a long time. Steven A. Greenberg, in BMJ, tells us how this can happen. This is an excellent and important piece of work which gores some very powerful, oxen, so I recommend it even though it may be somewhat heavy going.To translate it into English, what Greenberg did was to study all the papers addressing a claim or hypothesis that an uncommon muscle disease...
Source: Stayin' Alive - September 16, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs