How impotent man can have a baby in their bedroom using the Malpani Baby Kit
One of the problems of being infertile because of erectile dysfunction ( impotence) is that these men can ’t stop thinking of themselves as failures . They can't even do such a simple thing like making a baby in their bedroom - something which millions of men have been doing since time immemorial !The problem is compounded by the fact that their wife will often blame herself. She will feel that her husband does not find her sexually attractive, which is why he is not able to get an erection when have sex with her.This can be hard to come to terms with - specially for many young successful professional men w...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - September 19, 2020 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Why is uncertainty so stressful?
Stress caused by uncertainty can be paralyzing. The information we are getting about the coronavirus seems to be changing by the hour — creating unprecedented uncertainty. There is a good reason your nerves are jangle, or you are feeling unsettled or anxious. Uncertainty is perceived as unsafe and potentially painful. Whether the situation is predictably positive or predictably negative, your brain prefers something familiar to something unfamiliar. Under stress, our brains depend on instinct rather than rational thought because the part of the brain responsible for critical thinking is busy dealing with the psycholo...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - March 25, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Eliz Greene Tags: Stress Management uncertainty Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Fears: What the AIDS Battle Should Teach Us About COVID-19
By ANISH KOKA, MD As the globe faces a novel, highly transmissible, lethal virus, I am most struck by a medicine cabinet that is embarrassingly empty for doctors in this battle.  This means much of the debate centers on mitigation of spread of the virus.  Tempers flare over discussions on travel bans, social distancing, and self quarantines, yet the inescapable fact remains that the medical community can do little more than support the varying fractions of patients who progress from mild to severe and life threatening disease.  This isn’t meant to minimize the massive efforts brought to bear to keep...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: CORVID-19 Health Policy Patients Physicians AIDS Anish Koka AZT coronavirus COVID-19 FDA novel coronavirus Pandemic Source Type: blogs

How to be Self-Aware in a Troubled World
You're reading How to be Self-Aware in a Troubled World, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Right now, it’s a challenging thing to stay connected, listening, and loving. To have a tender heart and an alive intelligence. From global to personal, so many issues press in from all sides. Admitting to yourself that sometimes no matter what you do, it all feels impotent. This can leave you feeling powerless and somewhat devastated. But we can remember that we have a deeper, real power at our disposal. Thi...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kiran Trace Tags: featured happiness philosophy psychology self improvement awareness mental health pickthebrain self-aware Source Type: blogs

Sound Advice for When You ’ re Feeling Useless
My friend is in the hospital, too sick for any food or flowers I might bring. Too sick for songs or stories. Too sick for silly nostalgia: “Remember our sailing lesson?” sounds random and rude. Right now it all comes down to cells and drugs and doctoring. Unable to provide those, I feel useless. Feeling useless — worse yet, telling you I do — makes me feel even more useless: not just basically useless as in being neither a magician nor a physician but now also a whiny baby making everything all about me. Feeling useless is an under-discussed form of suffering which, I think, drives depression. It me...
Source: World of Psychology - October 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Family Friends Publishers Spirituality & Health action hero complex Inaction useful useless Source Type: blogs

The Auer Doctrine Suffers Pyrrhic Victory in Kisor v. Wilkie
Sometimes it ’s possible to lose in name only. Consider, for example,Cato ’s position inKisor v. Wilkie, which the Supreme Court yesterday decided.By a 5 – 4 vote, the Court upheld theAuer doctrine, or binding judicial deference to an agency ’s interpretation of its own regulation. Only four Justices actually validated theAuer doctrine; Chief Justice Roberts provided the fifth vote solely out of respect for precedent. Ina brief supporting the petitioner, Cato had argued that the Court should overturn  Auer, so technically our position lost.Nevertheless, the opinion of the Court “reinforce...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 27, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: William Yeatman Source Type: blogs

Politically Driven Public Health Disinformation - the Latest Examples: Dread Infections, Porn Causing White Male Impotence
(Source: Health Care Renewal)
Source: Health Care Renewal - June 23, 2019 Category: Health Management Tags: disinformation health policy propaganda public health Source Type: blogs

The Placebo Effect, Digested – 10 Amazing Findings
By Christian Jarrett The placebo effect usually triggers an eye-brow raise or two among even the most hard-nosed of skeptics. We may not be able to forecast the future or move physical objects with our minds, but the placebo effect is nearly as marvellous (Ben Goldacre once called it the “coolest, strangest thing in medicine”). The term “placebo effect” is short-hand for how our mere beliefs about the effectiveness of an inert treatment or intervention can lead to demonstrable health benefits and cognitive changes – an apparently incontrovertible demonstration of the near-magical power of mind...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Feature Source Type: blogs

Bloomberg Unwittingly Vindicates Stigler
In a recent Bloomberg Governmentarticle, Cheryl Bolen pushes back against what she perceives to be two myths of the much-touted Trump deregulatory agenda: that deregulation is in fact occurring, and that repeal of existing regulations actually helps businesses. I shall address these in reverse order, first demonstrating that most regulation is a net drag on the economy, and then mustering evidence to the effect that the Trump administration ’s deregulatory push is real indeed.Do Regulations Hurt Businesses?Celebrating deregulatory efforts concedes the premise that the typical regulation is on net more costly than it ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 26, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Stop Your Mind from Broadcasting Fake News
We who experience anxiety, depression and self-hatred know fake news better than anyone. At a recent rally in Washington DC, Catholic students from Kentucky’s Covington High School encountered Native American elder Nathan Phillips. Things occurred. Words were said. Spectators captured images. Within minutes, the media went wild. Divergent factions accused each other of bigotry, harassment, violently punishable crimes — and the ultimate modern-day offense: spreading fake news. As now occurs so often, amidst a maelstrom of ever-more-adjustible pictures and words, real-life events become hazy accounts, transferred...
Source: World of Psychology - February 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Brain and Behavior Publishers Self-Esteem Self-Help Spirituality & Health anxiety Depression Fake News Self-Hatred Source Type: blogs

Hormonal therapy for aggressive prostate cancer: How long is enough?
This study reaffirms what many clinicians have put into practice: longer duration hormonal therapy in appropriately selected patient populations provides a greater benefit,” said Dr. Marc Garnick, the Gorman Brothers Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and editor in chief of HarvardProstateKnowledge.org. “Prior studies using three years of hormonal therapy have also shown this, but it is important to recognize that some men may have significantly delayed return of the body’s testosterone upon completion of the therapy — a fact that needs to be di...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Health Living With Prostate Cancer Prostate Knowledge Treatments HPK Source Type: blogs

Psychotherapy: When not doing is doing it best
It ’s hard to sit with someone who is crying or angry or yearning or silent for long periods and not want to do something to make them feel better, to break the tension in the room. But most of the time if that desire to do something is acted upon, the outcome is not what we hope. For me, this is a l esson I have had to learn again and again.I have been thinking about this a lot lately. What comes to me is the image of an infant in the throes of colic. You try everything to make them stop because that cry is distressing, because it makes you feel impotent and frustrated and even angry. Rock the baby. Pat the baby. Si...
Source: Jung At Heart - January 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: blogs

Index Funds: Promise or Peril?
This is Part I in a two-part series in which I address the argument that: 1) index funds are seizing an outsized influence over publicly traded corporations, and 2) that they are wielding this influence so as to reduce intra-industry competition between firms in their portfolio. In this post, I summarize the argument and offer some criticisms as to why this influence may not be as significant as it appears. In Part II, I will proceed to argue that, to the extent that index funds have indeed acquired some  influence over the firms in their portfolio, this may in fact be a salutary development.I. “Common Ownership...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 13, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Q & A with Dr. Daniel Rukstalis on prostatic urethral lift for enlarged prostates
A new procedure that relieves symptoms without causing sexual side effects As men get older, their prostates often get bigger and block the flow of urine out of the bladder. This condition, which is called benign prostatic hyperplasia, causes bothersome symptoms. Since men can’t fully empty their bladders, they experience sudden and frequent urges to urinate. Treatments can relieve these symptoms, but not without troubling side effects: pharmaceutical BPH treatments cause dizziness, fatigue, and retrograde ejaculation, meaning that semen gets diverted to the bladder during orgasm instead of being ejected from the bod...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: BPH Prostate Knowledge Q & A HPK Source Type: blogs

As I ’ve always suspected, Health Care = Communism + Frappuccinos
By MATTHEW HOLT Happy 15th birthday THCB! Yes, 15 years ago today this little blog opened for business and changed my life (and at least impacted a few others). Later this week we are going to celebrate and tell you a bit more about what the next 15 years (really?) of THCB might look like. But for now, I’m rerunning a few of my favorite pieces from the mid-2000s, the golden age of blogging. Today I present “Health Care = Communism + Frappuccinos”, one of my favorites about the relationship between government and private sector originally published here on Jan7, 2005. And like the Medicare one from last we...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Matthew Holt OP-ED 15th Birthday Celebration Commumism Frappuchinos Source Type: blogs

A Tale of 2 FDAs
By ANISH KOKA Frances Oldham Kelsey by all accounts was not mean to have a consequential life.  She was born in Canada in 1914, at a time women were meant to be seen and not heard.  Nonetheless, an affinity for science eventually lead to a masters in pharmacology from the prestigious McGill University.  Her first real break came after she was accepted for PhD level work in the pharmacology lab of a professor at the University of Chicago.  An esteemed professor was starting a pharmacology lab and needed assistants, and the man from Canada seemed to have a perfect resume to fit.  That’s right, ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A Public-Private Partnership to Fix Health Care
By BILL ROSENBERG The Administration proposal that would enable small employers to band together to purchase health insurance by forming Association Health Plans has several good features. Large companies do pay about 15% less, apples-to-apples, for health insurance than small businesses because they negotiate lower administrative fees, get larger discounts on health care prices and avoid premium taxes and risk charges by self-insuring. Allowing small business to replicate what boils down to volume discounts also appeals politically to many as a market-based alternative to government intervention. Reliance on Association H...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: OP-ED Trump's Health Bill Rosenberg Medicare public-private partnerships Source Type: blogs

MedStar Franklin Center:   The Case Against Global Capitation
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD Baltimore County, Maryland is one hour north of Washington DC, where politicians appear impotent to contain runaway healthcare expenditures.  In January 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the state of Maryland, piloted an “All Payer Model,” where every insurer, including Medicare and Medicaid, paid a fixed annual amount irrespective of inpatient or outpatient hospital utilization.  Maryland agreed to transition hospitals from fee-for-service arrangements to this global capitation model over five years.  Capitation, in general, reimb...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Would You Want To Know Whether You ’re At Risk For Alzheimer’s?
Do genetic tests help in preparing for potential future health issues or open Pandora’s box full of concerns, worries and hypochondriac thoughts? Would you want to know your genetic fate? Whether you are at risk for Alzheimer’s or a chronic disease 30 years in advance? Would you want to live with this kind of information? Would you take the BRCA test to find out that you are at risk for breast cancer? What would you do if you were? The Medical Futurist team contemplated situations requiring hard, life-altering decisions. What would you do? Our genetic heritage carries secrets that are difficult to process In Se...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 28, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Genomics alzheimer disease DNA dna testing doctor-patient doctor-patient relationship DTC future genetics Huntington's patient empowerment personal genomics Source Type: blogs

Our brains rapidly and automatically process opinions we agree with as if they are facts
By Christian Jarrett In a post-truth world of alternative facts, there is understandable interest in the psychology behind why people are generally so wedded to their opinions and why it is so difficult to change minds. We already know a lot about the deliberate mental processes that people engage in to protect their world view, from seeking out confirmatory evidence (the “confirmation bias“) to questioning the methods used to marshal contradictory evidence (the scientific impotence excuse). Now a team led by Michael Gilead at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev report in Social Psychological and Personality Sci...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Decision making Thought Source Type: blogs

Reflections on school violence: a psychodynamic perspective
The mental health community must increase its clinical acumen regarding complex psycho-pathology consisting of the avoidant personality, social impotence, and related rage. School violence has taken on epidemic proportions since two disturbed adolescents masterminded Columbine and became role models for the mentally ill young men who drive the new culture of school shootings. While the profile of the school shooter has evolved over the last couple of decades, it’s worth considering the behavioral patterns and psychodynamics significantly present in school shootings. For the mental health profession to increase its cl...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jonathan-berent" rel="tag" > Jonathan Berent, LCSW < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

New study once again casts doubt on PSA screening
This study adds to the discouraging screening literature, and again, simply does not support screening of asymptomatic individuals,” he said. Fortunately, Garnick added, men diagnosed with prostate cancer following a PSA test may not have to be treated either in the short or long term. Depending on tumor characteristics, some can opt to have their cancer monitored with active surveillance, which relies on periodic prostate biopsies or MRI to look for new signs that treatment may be necessary. “Hopefully, current research that uses sophisticated genetic testing or biomarkers of prostate cancer may help provide m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prostate Health Screening Source Type: blogs

The 1000th Thread!
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - December 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs

The 1000th Thread!
This is the 1000th presentation to my bioethics blog since starting on Google Blogspot.com in 2004.There has been many topics covered. Though comments by the visitors has always been encouraged and, since as a "discussion blog", comments leading to discussions I have felt was the definitive function here. Virtually none of the thread topics have gone unread and most have had some commentary, some with mainly particularly strong and emphatic opinions http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2013/01/should-pathologists-be-physicians.html, some with extensive up to 12 years long continued discussion http://bioethicsd...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Weekend Poem #1
CarnageWe sit together on our balcony by the coastSipping coffee, reading the papers.A plate of untouched stacked toastIn repose on the table between us.We meditate and take exaggerated deep breaths.Complacent, self-assured smilesAfter all the hard work, all the trekked miles.I write in the margins of a magazine:The surf gently laps against the shoreThe ocean is a flat gray matLapping and lollingBut the early morning ocean sheenUnfurled before us is not a peaceful scene.Before us is a vast, unbeknownst killing fieldAnd the ashen water an impotent shieldExtending westward in ever deafening silenceUntil it ’s cut by a ...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - December 17, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Weekend Poem
CarnageWe sit together on our balcony by the coastSipping coffee, reading the papers.A plate of untouched stacked toastIn repose on the table between us.We meditate and take exaggerated deep breaths.Complacent, self-assured smilesAfter all the hard work, all the trekked miles.I write in the margins of a magazine:The surf gently laps against the shoreThe ocean is a flat gray matLapping and lollingBut the early morning ocean sheenUnfurled before us is not a peaceful scene.Before us is a vast, unbeknownst killing fieldAnd the ashen water an impotent shieldExtending westward in ever deafening silenceUntil it ’s cut by a ...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - December 17, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Why Smart Pill Bottles and Financial Rewards Don ’t Improve Medication Adherence
By HILARY HATCH A study published recently in JAMA Internal Medicine showed financial rewards and connected pill bottles don’t work. One explanation suggests that “other patient concerns about potential adverse effects of these medications, such as impotence or fatigue, were not targeted by this engagement strategy.” What?!!!!!?? How can a patient engagement strategy not target the patient’s concerns? Isn’t that the very definition of patient engagement? Impotence and fatigue are a big deal to most people. Would an extra $15 a week compel you to take a medication that made you impotent? $150 a...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A Real (Living, Breathing) Health Care Reform Plan: Drop MACRA
By STEVEN SOUMERAI Dear Washington, Congratulations! You have listened to the AMA and practicing physicians and made it a little easier to comply (at first) with the Medicare Quality Payment Program, part of the massive MACRA “pay for value” law.  But CMS’ announcements in The Federal Register and “fact sheet” are incomprehensible gobbledygook that will be understood by neither doctors, patients, nor the rest of society. The language personifies the complexity, unwieldiness and confused thinking in this huge national policy.  MACRA is a $15 billion boondoggle that the best rese...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized ACO CMS Health Care Reform MACRA Veerma Source Type: blogs

The striking parallels between doctors and journalists
Once during my TV news days, I was feeling pretty good about myself during a three-hour drive to the Mayo Clinic. “I am so glad I don’t practice!” I crowed to my photographer. “Practicing physicians are so sad. They’ve lost their income, their autonomy, and the public’s respect.” My photographer didn’t miss a beat. “Yeah,” he replied. “They sound just like you.” By which he meant that as a journalist, I’d lost those very same entitlements. As they say: You can’t see the paradigm when you’re in the paradigm. For better or worse, though...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 25, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-breen" rel="tag" > Michael Breen, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Mainstream media Source Type: blogs

The Jobs Conundrum
At next week ’s FOMC meeting, the state of the labor market will play a key role in policy deliberations. But there’s a lot more going on underneath top line unemployment numbers that make them a bad tool for monetary policy decision-making.The May employment reportis a conundrum. Employment growth and the unemployment rate sent opposing signals about labor market conditions — much like they have been doing throughout the recovery. The economy added138,000 jobs last month, with the three-month average only at 121,000 jobs, suggesting labor market weakness.By contrast, the unemployment rate fell to 4.3 per...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 8, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Gerald P. O ' Driscoll Jr. Source Type: blogs

Where Are All These Globalists I Keep Reading About?
There ’s a new scholarly journal out there called American Affairs. Eliana Johnson of Politico describes it as “a journal of public policy and political philosophy with an eye toward laying the intellectual foundation for the Trump movement.” Many people in the Trump movement purport to be in favor of “nationalism” over “globalism,” so you can imagine the journal will have some things to say about this topic. In themission statement, the editors note the following:We are said to live in a “globalized” world. Yet the most conspicuous global phenomenon of the pr...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 15, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Simon Lester Source Type: blogs

To PSA test or not to PSA test: That is the discussion
Though it seems Americans don’t agree on much, screening for cancer is an exception. Who wouldn’t support preventing or identifying cancer at an early, more treatable stage, when the alternative is pain, toxic therapies, and a shortened life? That may be why people get confused when news headlines don’t reinforce a “just do it” message. A recent example of the disconnect between public perception and medical evidence is screening for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), a non-governmental expert panel that pr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steven J. Atlas, MD, MPH Tags: Cancer Health Managing your health care Men's Health Prostate Health Screening Source Type: blogs

Beta-blockers, Statins, AF, and the Nocebo Effect
Our brains can easily fool us. No experienced doctor would deny the power of the placebo effect. Today I want to discuss the nocebo effect, which occurs when negative expectations of something causes it to have a more negative effect than it otherwise would. Drugs can exert a strong nocebo effect. If your brain thinks you will have a side effect, you may actually get that effect. Nocebo brain trickery is relevant to statins. That’s why I used this wording in my last post: (Note the italics) The actual frequency of muscle symptoms is hotly debated. Randomized controlled trials (in which patients don’t know wheth...
Source: Dr John M - May 2, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

USPSTF adopts my reasoning on PSA screening for prostate cancer
Which way on PSA? I oppose over-testing and over-treatment, so I really had to think hard five years ago when I turned 45 and my doctor offered PSA screening for prostate caner. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) had just come out against PSA screening, concluding that the harms outweighed the benefits. Nonetheless (Why I decided to get a PSA screening test for prostate cancer), I did go forward. As I wrote: I know that PSA is a very imperfect indicator. I definitely want to avoid the stress and possible discomfort of having a biopsy. I’m worried about false positive and false negative biopsy re...
Source: Health Business Blog - April 13, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: dewe67 Tags: Patients Physicians Policy and politics Research Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Top Virtual Reality Companies in Healthcare
What is the common denominator of behavioral psychology, pain management, medical training, rehabilitation and meditation? The answer is virtual reality. I believe that within a few years, VR will be a game-changer in these areas. Thus, it is high time to enlist the most important VR companies in healthcare. VR is conquering new heigths in terms of healthcare and sales figures Medical VR is an area with fascinating possibilities. It has not just moved the imagination of science-fiction fans, but also clinical researchers and real life medical practitioners. As a doctor, you could assist in the OR without ever lifting a sca...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 5, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Virtual Reality in Medicine future GC1 Healthcare Innovation meditation pain management Personalized medicine psychology rehabilitation VR Source Type: blogs

6 Mental Hacks For Working Out
You're reading 6 Mental Hacks For Working Out, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 50% of people over 18 years don´t meet the amount of recommended weekly exercise. If you are one of those people struggling to finally start and keep a regular workout routine, here are 6 mental hacks for working out: 1. Think longterm The truth is, no matter how hard you may train, you won´t suddenly lose 20 pounds in a week or go from running 2 ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Runningmax95 Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement best health advice mental discipline mental hacks pickthebrain workout tips Source Type: blogs

Don't Put Your Suicide Message in a Bottle
“Oh please, dear Lord, take me home.” ☜ Somebody posted this on Facebook last night. I had been reading this woman’s cries for help for weeks, but never spoke up because dozens upon dozens of people jumped into each post to give her love and encouragement. I didn’t believe that I could add anything that her peers hadn’t already expressed. Last night, however, this post bothered me. If you’ve read my blog, you know how I feel aboutdrive-by suicide notes. These types of posts are cathartic for the people who leave them, but they burden the folks who read them. They aren’t construct...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - January 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Depression Goodreads Suicide Source Type: blogs

How Meditation Helps Our Relationships
We may think of meditation as a way to gain inner peace and tranquility. But have you considered how a meditation practice can create a climate that deepens intimacy and improves communication? John Gottman’s research into what makes marriages succeed rveals that when partnerships are marred by a high degree of criticism, contempt, stonewalling, and defensiveness, they often end up in divorce. How can we reduce these intimacy-busting behaviors and create a climate that supports the love we want? Uncovering Deeper Feelings Our tendency to criticize, attack, or diagnose others (“you’re self-centered, arrog...
Source: World of Psychology - December 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Anger General Happiness Mindfulness Psychology Relationships Self-Help Spirituality Attachment Theory Criticism Intimacy john gottman Love Meditation trust Source Type: blogs

How the “Public Option” Became Just Another Fuzzy Buzzword
By KIP SULLIVAN, JD In an earlier post, I criticized managed care proponents for promoting concepts defined only by the aspirations of their proponents.  HMO, ACO, “medical home,” and “patient-centered this and that” are examples. The “public option” (PO) is the latest example of a buzzword defined only by the aspirations of its proponents. The PO, first introduced to the public a decade ago by Jacob Hacker, Democratic presidential candidates and advocates of what would become the Affordable Care Act, has been revived by Democrats over the last five months. [1] Hacker, Hillary Clint...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Five Lessons From 30 Years Of Bundled Payments
In recent years, large employers, physician groups, and commercial and governmental payers have been increasingly interested in the use of episode-based bundled payments as a mechanism to promote high-quality health care and smarter spending. A “bundled payment” occurs when a payer provides reimbursement to providers for a full range of care, rather than paying individual bills for parts of that care such as the surgery, physician fees, and post-acute care. The Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model and the recently announced acute myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass graft bundled payment p...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 3, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Alan L. Kaplan, Chad Ellimoottil and J. Thomas Rosenthal Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Organization and Delivery Payment Policy Alternative Payment Models Bundled Payments California Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model Source Type: blogs

Vicarious Trauma: How Much More Can We Take?
Another week, another tragedy. It’s hard to take it all in, let alone make any sense of it. How does bad news affect us? We can all be affected by vicarious trauma. That is the “one step removed” trauma that didn’t actually happen to us directly, but which still impacts us nonetheless. Obviously, for the victims’ friends and relatives the effects are acute, but for onlookers (also from the news, social media and the press) these events have a profound cumulative effect. When experiencing physical or emotional trauma first- or secondhand, our brains are affected by a perceived threat...
Source: World of Psychology - August 31, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maxine Harley Tags: Disorders General Grief and Loss Psychology PTSD Trauma Violence and Aggression brain Emotion Feeling fight or flight Mass murder mass shooting Psychological Trauma ripple effect social media Terrorism Tragedy Worry Source Type: blogs

To the doctors struggling with depression: You are not alone
By the end of my first year of residency, I knew I was in trouble. I was overwhelmed by the 15-hour days, the unbearable sadness of the tragedies I witnessed, my feelings of impotence and my fears of making a mistake. My life was my work, and everything else seemed to be falling apart: my physical health, my relationships, my ability to sleep after months of night shifts. Yet, I came to work every day. I completed every task. And then I’d go home each night and cry. An administrator pulled me aside one morning: “How’s it going?” she asked. I began to sob. “Well, get yourself together and get r...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 30, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/elisabeth-poorman" rel="tag" > Elisabeth Poorman, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Macro View – Health And Political News Relevant To E-Health And Health In General.
August 18 Edition.-----A fortnight where we have all sorts of macro-economic news dominating little Australia with the central banks in the US, UK and Japan all adjusting policy of leaving things as they are for now.Interest rates in Australia have dropped again and overseas we see ongoing issues with other economies. Zerohedge reports that the global money supply has risen to $89 Trillion from only 10% of that just 15 years ago.The major themes this week have been the impotence of central banks and the need for Governments to actually start making some sensible decisions.The most important issue that was flagged this...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - August 18, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 153
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 153 Question 1 What part of your body could be considered callipygian? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1470131363'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1470131363')) Your buttocks The Callipygian Venus, literally meaning “Venus (or Aphrodite) of the beautiful buttocks is a roman statue, housed in Naples. [Reference] Question 2 Why do you hands and feet wr...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 8, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five callipygian cardiac tamponade electrical alternans Q-fever Stethoscope total alternans Source Type: blogs

Suicide Watch: Can You Walk Away from Cyberbullying?
The other day a young girl from Florida named Tovonna committed suicide after friends posted nude photos & video of her onto Snapchat—a popular mobile app for sharing media with friends. According to reports, her mother didn’t understand what Tovonna was upset about. It’s possible she was hysterical and not clear, because it turns out she had been filmed while showering. Three hours after talking to her mother, she shot herself with her mother’s pistol. Tovonna’s death has been overshadowed this weekend by the horrific gay bar mass-shooting in Orlando, but while some people might want to f...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - June 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Depression Goodreads Suicide Source Type: blogs

When Washington Should Say Nothing
North Korea appears headed for a fifth nuclear test. The U.S. joined South Korea and Japan in warning Pyongyang against violating its international obligations. Just as the three governments have done for the last quarter century. Alas, they cannot stop the North from moving forward with its nuclear program, at least at reasonable cost. Washington should learn the value of saying nothing The U.S. stands apart from the rest of the world. American officials circle the globe lecturing other nations. Yet other governments rarely heed Washington. It doesn’t matter whether they are friends or foes. Other states act in thei...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 31, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs

Hyperbole is seldom helpful. Especially when it comes to medical errors.
Josef Stalin famously said: “One death is a tragedy; one million is a statistic.” Perhaps 250,000 preventable deaths from medical errors, according to an analysis by Makary and Daniel in the BMJ, maketh a Stalin. The problem with Makary’s analysis, which also concluded that medical errors are the third leading cause of death, isn’t the method. Yes, the method is shaky. It projects medical errors from a series of thirty-five patients to a country of 320 million, which is like deciding national spice tolerance on what my family eats for dinner. The problem with Makary’s analysis isn’t that...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 29, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Hospital Malpractice Source Type: blogs

In defense of medical societies – especially ACP
A recent comment attacked medical societies as being impotent on several issues.  The commenter clearly expects these societies to work quick visible changes.  Here is my take: My recent leadership role at ACP makes this answer biased, but I believe your expectations of medical societies are harsh. These societies are not impotent, but they are also not potent enough to drive policies. I can speak best for ACP. Let’s take your concerns: Defining quality Please read the ACP’s performance measurement evaluations – https://www.acponline.org/clinical-information/performance-measures These evaluation...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - May 25, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs