Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 9th 2020
In this study, young adult mice were submitted to endurance exercise training and the function, differentiation, and metabolic characteristics of satellite cells were investigated in vivo and in vitro. We found that injured muscles from endurance-exercised mice display improved regenerative capacity, demonstrated through higher densities of newly formed myofibres compared with controls (evidenced by an increase in embryonic myosin heavy chain expression), as well as lower inflammation (evidenced by quantifying CD68-marked macrophages), and reduced fibrosis. Enhanced myogenic function was accompanied by an increased ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

RyR2 as a Target to Prevent Alzheimer's Symptoms in a Mouse Model of the Condition
Mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are quite artificial: mice, and indeed most mammals, do not naturally exhibit the relevant mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease, such as aggregation of amyloid-β. The details of the model become important in determining whether or not discoveries and interventions are relevant in anything other than the model. Thus one shouldn't become too excited by any small adjustment to cellular metabolism that appears to have profound effects on the progression of the condition in these models. Maybe it will be relevant to the human condition, but the odds are not good, looking at the hist...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 2nd 2020
In conclusion, the circulating antibody repertoire has increased binding to thousands of peptides in older donors, which can be represented as an immune age. Increased immune age is associated with autoimmune disease, acute inflammatory disease severity, and may be a broadly relevant biomarker of immune function in health, disease, and therapeutic intervention. The immune age has the potential for wide-spread use in clinical and consumer settings. In Vivo Reprogramming Improves Cognitive Function in Old Mice https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/in-vivo-reprogramming-improves-cognitive-function-in-old-mic...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 1, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Towards Restoration of Mitophagy to Reverse Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease
Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, a herd of bacteria-like organelles responsible for packaging energy store molecules used to power the chemistry of life. With age, mitochondria become dysfunctional throughout the body, for reasons that are not yet fully understood, but which clearly contribute to the onset of age-related declines and diseases. There is certainly stochastic damage to mitochondrial DNA that can lead to a small but significant number of pathological cells dumping oxidizing molecules into the surrounding tissue, but the general malaise of mitochondria is more sweeping than this. One impor...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Rabies – a dumb disease
Dog vaccination programs are the most effective way to prevent Rabies   Rabies is endemic to over 150 countries, and according to the World Health Organization, 99% of all transmissions to humans are from dogs, potentially bringing into question the animal’s status as the ‘man’s best friend’.  In Europe, southern Africa, and parts of North America, most cases are acquired from wild carnivores; mongooses, and vampire bats in Latin America and the Caribbean. In more recent years, humans have acquired rabies from inhalation of aerosols in bat caves, ingestion of dogs and cats for food, ticks...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 28, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 8, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net looks at a new study on building strong bonds between children and nature, how Google’s search monopoly is affecting the mental health crisis, research suggesting baby boomers aren’t as mentally sharp as their parents’ generation, and more. Stay well, friends! To Bond With Nature, Kids Need Solitary Activities Outdoors: A new study finds that solitary activities (thinking hunting, fishing, and just hiking around and exploring) are perfect for children to build strong bonds with nature. Not only do these kinds of activities help children enjoy being outside, bu...
Source: World of Psychology - August 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Adhd Amygdala antitrust anxiety Baby Boomers demntia Depression emotional processing Google Hippocampus kids Loneliness Memory Nature outdoors Source Type: blogs

Children, teens, and the safety of psychotropic medicines
Medicines prescribed for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders — known as psychotropic drugs — have largely been studied in adults. This concerns many parents whose children take these drugs regularly. Studies have most often looked at the effectiveness of these medicines in teens and children. Now a recent systematic review of multiple studies done in children and adolescents offers new guidance on safety for commonly used medicines. What did the study look at? The aim of this study was to comprehensively synthesize current evidence on the safety of four...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hyun Jung Kim, MD Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Debating ‘ Anti-Psychiatry ’ Advocacy
Conclusion, do not visit cardiologists. They will give you heart attacks. No, that’s ridiculous. It’s so mind blowing that anyone even said this, right? It’s just ugh. Obviously, people who are extremely sick and who are at risk of killing themselves get psychiatric care. No kidding. So, yeah, this is, in fact, very dangerous. Gabe: The word bullshit is not big enough. This is the literal equivalent of me saying that I looked at fifty thousand people who went to the hospital in the last year. And you were much more likely to die if you had a hospital admission. Now, I’m talking physical health now. ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Psychiatry Treatment Source Type: blogs

Beware Websites & Apps Pushing Fake Screening Quiz Results
As the internet grows and people find new ways to make money online, more anonymous websites are being published by companies who have little background or interest in mental health. And sadly, thousands of people flock to these sites every day, unaware that they may be taking a fake mental health test on depression or ADHD. Google and other search engines are supposed to be able to determine the quality of health websites, supposedly emphasizing and promoting those with good E-A-T — expertise, authoritativeness, and trustworthiness. That’s what they claim. So it’s a bit of head-scratcher when looking up...
Source: World of Psychology - June 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Technology Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Depression depression screening Source Type: blogs

FDA clears first videogame to be prescribed to kids with ADHD: EndeavorRx by Akili Interactive Labs
Screenshot of EndeavorRx In a landmark decision, FDA greenlights a video game for kids with ADHD (STAT): The Food and Drug Administration on Monday for the first time gave a green light to a game-based therapeutic: a video game meant to be prescribed to kids with ADHD. The game, known as EndeavorRx and developed by Boston-based Akili Interactive Labs, can now be marketed as a way to improve attention function in kids with ADHD as measured by computerized testing. Physicians can prescribe it to children between the ages of 8 and 12 who have an ADHD diagnosis and have demonstrated an issue with attention. The FDA’s mov...
Source: SharpBrains - June 18, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Professional Development Technology 510(k) Adam Gazzaley adhd Akili Interactive Labs computerized testing De Novo digital therapeutics EndeavorRx FDA game-based therapeutic TOVA videog Source Type: blogs

Launching Late: How to Help Your Child with Failure to Launch
“Failure to launch” has been used recently to describe grown children who, for one reason or another, aren’t willing or able to leave their family home to pursue their own goals, lead independent lives and become self-sufficient. This phenomenon is on the rise, and it’s important to understand what can cause it and what you can do to help a child get through it.  Early Signs of Failure to Launch Most parents who have an adult child who has “failed to launch” identify some of these factors being present in their child: Unwillingness or inability to take on responsibilities Low self-...
Source: World of Psychology - June 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sean Paul, MD Tags: Parenting Success & Achievement Autonomy college Failure to Launch Personal Independence Source Type: blogs

Are You Experiencing Quarantine Brain?
Another term is being added to the lexicon in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: quarantine brain. It takes many forms, from confusion and fogginess to limited executive functioning. Those who fall prey to it may find themselves unable to complete tasks, manage their time and routine, and make sound decisions. This occurs even if the person has no prior history with attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Some report a lack of motivation to get out of bed, let alone engage in their daily activities. What helps them is knowing that their boss, teachers, and family are counting on them to launch...
Source: World of Psychology - May 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Dreams Memory and Perception Personal Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Resilience social distancing Source Type: blogs

Struggling with attention and organization as you age? It could be ADHD, not dementia
As we get older, occasional forgetfulness may become more worrisome. Is this the start of dementia, or are we just stressed? Has the loss of structure due to retirement led to this change? Or could we be suffering from another illness, maybe the same illness as our son or granddaughter, who also struggle with attention and organization? What are the symptoms of ADHD in older adults? Although the diagnosis of ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is often associated with school-age children, this condition may persist throughout adulthood and into old age. Older adults with ADHD struggle with attention, memory, an...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephanie Collier, MD, MPH Tags: Healthy Aging Memory Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Bipolar & Substance Abuse Disorders: A Complex Diagnosis that Demands Integrated Medical & Psychological Care
The word “bipolar” has become colloquially associated with anything that changes rapidly or is unpredictable: the weather, technology, sports teams, politics, or even a teenager’s attitude. But for roughly 46 million people worldwide, being “bipolar” is far more serious than typical unpredictability, mood swings, or temperamental behavior. And, when bipolar disorder is complicated by substance use disorder (SUD), the situation can become incredibly dangerous for the individual and those around them. Recognizing the symptoms of bipolar and the complicating factors of substance use disorder is c...
Source: World of Psychology - March 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marlon Rollins Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Bipolar Disorder Detox Dual Diagnosis World Bipolar Day Source Type: blogs

Large study finds positive yet mixed results from Akili ’s digital therapeutic for kids with ADHD
This study aimed to assess whether AKL-T01 improved attentional performance in paediatric patients with ADHD. Findings: Between July 15, 2016, and Nov 30, 2017, 857 patients were evaluated and 348 were randomly assigned to receive AKL-T01 or control. Among patients who received AKL-T01 (n=180 [52%]; mean [SD] age, 9·7 [1·3] years) or control (n=168 [48%]; mean [SD] age, 9·6 [1·3] years), the non-parametric estimate of the population median change from baseline TOVA API was 0·88 (95% CI 0·24–1·49; p=0·0060). The mean (SD) change from baseline on the TOVA API was ...
Source: SharpBrains - February 25, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology ADHD-medication Akili Akili Interactive Akili Interactive Labs AKL-T01 behavioral digital health digital therapeutics pediatric ADHD Project EVO TOVA AP Source Type: blogs

Handheld Eye Scanner to Detect Autism Spectrum Disorder
Researchers at Flinders University in Australia have developed a handheld eye scanner that could help to identify children with autism spectrum disorder. The device allows clinicians to obtain light-adapted electroretinograms, which involves detecting electrical signals in the retina. The device could help in diagnosing children with autism much earlier, meaning that they can get appropriate support as soon as possible. Parents who have had one autistic child have a higher chance of having a second, and early diagnosis would be very valuable for such families. One of the researchers behind the device, Dr. Paul Constabl...
Source: Medgadget - February 24, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Ophthalmology Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

What ’s normal? When it comes to the brain, it’s hard to say, and that’s why we need to study global neurodiversity
In a small village in India—a place so remote it has no electricity, no telecommunication system, and no cars or buses—a research worker prepares to place an EEG headset on a female villager’s head. The woman, who earns $3.75 a day laboring in a nearby rice paddy and who has never ventured outside her village, eyes the futuristic device with trepidation. “Is it going to hurt my head?” she asks. Sathish, the research worker, has heard this question before. In fact, he’s heard several similar queries from anxious villagers who have gotten scared when they saw the brainwear. “Wil...
Source: SharpBrains - February 12, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tan Le Tags: Author Speaks Series Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology alpha oscillation axons Berger’s Wave bias big data brain-enhancement brain-related diseases Brainnovations brains brainwa Source Type: blogs

Understanding, educating, and supporting children with specific learning disabilities: 50 years of science and practice. - PsycNET
https://psycnet-apa-org.ezp2.lib.umn.edu/record/2019-25332-001Grigorenko, E. L., Compton, D. L., Fuchs, L. S., Wagner, R. K., Willcutt, E. G.,& Fletcher, J. M. (2020). Understanding, educating, and supporting children with specific learning disabilities: 50 years of science and practice. American Psychologist, 75(1), 37 –51. https://doi-org.ezp2.lib.umn.edu/10.1037/amp0000452AbstractSpecific learning disabilities (SLDs) are highly relevant to the science and practice of psychology, both historically and currently, exemplifying the integration of interdisciplinary approaches to human conditions. They can...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - January 29, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Using AI and MRI to Detect ADHD
Researchers from theCincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center are utilizingmultichannel deep neural network model (mcDNN) in conjunction with MRI to predict attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to a  studyrecently published inRadiology: Artificial Intelligence. In the United States, a total of 6.1 million children have been diagnosed with ADHD. Many children with ADHD also struggle with at least one other mental, emotional, or behavioral condition, and 30 percent of youth suffer from anxiety. To lessen the symptoms, many children undergo a combination of behavioral therapy and med...
Source: radRounds - January 18, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Top 25 Psychiatric Medications for 2018
Psychiatric medications are an important part of treatment for many people with mental disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, anxiety, and others. They play an important role in helping to alleviate the most serious symptoms, allowing people to better focus on their lives and on other treatment types, such as psychotherapy. Psychiatric medications are an important part of many people’s treatment plans for obtaining the most effective treatment for a mental health concern or mental illness. It’s good to know what drugs are being prescribed most often for mental disorders in the U.S...
Source: World of Psychology - December 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Medications Psychiatry psychiatric meds psychiatric prescriptions Source Type: blogs

Neural Feedback Technique to Improve Attention
Many people suffer from an inability to focus on tasks that require a great deal of attention. Drugs such as Ritalin are available to help mitigate symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and related conditions, but these medications come with a number of side effects, including long term dependence. Now, researchers at MIT have developed a neural feedback technique that may be effective in helping people to generate the types of brainwaves that are beneficial for maximizing attention. The technology used in the study is non-invasive and doesn’t in itself affect the brain in any way. Rather, in...
Source: Medgadget - December 9, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: December 7, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at what to do if you think your child is at risk for mental illness, why self-regulation is so important for people with ADHD, the symptoms of problematic smartphone use, and the mental and physical fatigue that often accompanies chronic illness, and more.     Does Mental Illness Run in Families?: What should you do if you suspect your child is at risk of developing a mental disorder — especially when mental illness runs in your family? According to psychologist Scott Bea PsyD, an important first step is helping your child build resilience, a persona...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Traci Pedersen Tags: ADHD and ADD Anxiety and Panic Autism Children and Teens Depression Disorders Family General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Asd Bipolar Disorder Source Type: blogs

This Supplement Treats ADHD Better Than Drugs (M)
The common supplement reduces symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - November 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: ADHD subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Concerning Findings About Cannabis Use
While recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states as of November 2019, more states gravitating toward legalizing the recreational use of the substance, and 33 states allowing medical marijuana, there’s apparently no stopping this trend. Cannabis, in the form of marijuana, hemp, and cannabidiol (CBD)  is being used for pain relief, to alleviate stress, cope with anxiety, and a number of other mental health disorders and addictions. Yet, there’s a dearth of clinical studies that have been conducted on the overall effects on a user’s health. Clearly, as Crain’s Detroit Business points out, more ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Medications Substance Abuse Cannabis Marijuana Source Type: blogs

Think your child has ADHD? What your pediatrician can — and should — do
ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, is the most common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood. It affects approximately 7% to 8% of all children and youth in the US. As the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) pointed out in their recent clinical practice guideline for ADHD, that’s more than the mental health system can handle, which means that pediatricians need to step up and help out. So, if your child is having problems with attention, focus, hyperactivity, impulsivity, or some combination of those, and is at least 4 years old, your first step should be an appointment with your child’s primary...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Neurological conditions Parenting Source Type: blogs

Video Game Uses Brain Wave Monitoring to Treat ADHD
While there are a number of drugs to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), they can have some pretty serious side effects. Researchers in Singapore at the country’s Institute of Mental Health (IMH), Duke-NUS (National University of Singapore) Medical School, and A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), have developed a system that combines neuromonitoring with video games to help kids improve their ADHD symptoms. Neeuro Pte Ltd. is a local company that has been spun off to commercialize the technology. So far, a randomized controlled trial of the prototype of the technology was su...
Source: Medgadget - November 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Neurology Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How ADHD Can Hamper Sex —And How Both Partners Can Help
During sex, partners don’t only connect physically; they can connect emotionally and spiritually, too. During this kind of intimacy, couples are able to be fully present, focusing on their partners—without the distractions of phones, jobs, and expanding to-do lists. Which is vital. After all, satisfying sex contributes to a satisfying relationship—and even a satisfying life, according to Ari Tuckman, PsyD, CST, a psychologist, certified sex therapist, and speaker specializing in ADHD, relationships, and sexuality. Sex also provides us with a pleasurable break from daily mundane tasks—like chores, bi...
Source: World of Psychology - November 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Disorders General Happiness Marriage and Divorce Relationships Self-Help Sexuality Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Intimacy Sex Life Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: November 2, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net focuses on how turning your to-do list into an action plan can help you become more productive, why nightmares can be beneficial to your mental health, how your brain type affects who you are, and more. How Nightmares Could Be Good for Your Mental Health: Typically, we don’t view nightmares as pleasant experiences, but they might be positive ones. Well, have positive benefits, that is. Research shows that nightmares can help relieve stress, offer insight into our suppressed emotions, and prepare us for real-life threats. According to Harvard University’s Dr. Deirdre...
Source: World of Psychology - November 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Abusive Relationships Adhd brain types Mothers Nightmares Romantic Relationships Self Destruction Self Sabotage Teens Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: October 12, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes an interesting look at how our shadow selves affect relationships, why death anxiety is keeping men awake, strategies to help boost focus and motivation, and more. New Psychology Research Has Linked Death Anxiety to Bedtime Procrastination: A new study published in The Journal of General Psychology suggests “death anxiety” is a predictor of bedtime procrastination in males. After surveying 229 Turkish participants about their attitudes about death, sleeping behaviors, and self-control, researchers found that men who are bothered by their own mortality are more ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Adhd Brain Scans Children death death anxiety Focus Language Skills Mortality Motivation Relationships shadow self Sleep Spiritual Health Suicidal Behavior Suicide Risk Source Type: blogs

Should pediatricians treat ADHD with medications or behavioral treatment first?
When children are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, stimulant medications like Ritalin or Adderall are usually the first line of treatment. The American Academy of Pediatrics issued new guidelines Monday upholding that central role of medications accompanied by behavioral therapy in ADHD treatment. Some experts say, however, they are disappointed the new guidelines don ’t […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 6, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/alex-smith-2" rel="tag" > Alex Smith < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

From Theranos To Google Glass: The Biggest Flops In Digital Health
The tech start-up scene, investors, and news-reading audiences reward great stories on the edge of human capabilities – sometimes even on the boundary of science and science fiction – with their attention, money, or invested energy. However, sometimes marketing machines are better than actual technologies, and the ‘little bubbles’ around companies burst. Here, we collected the most promising digital health ideas and companies over the years that proved to be the greatest flops in medical innovation so far. ‘Big little bubbles’ that turned into digital health failures Humans love g...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers AI artificial intelligence companies development device digital digital health digital health market gadgets google google glass hype Innovation invention medical device promis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 30th 2019
In conclusion, older adults exhibited decreased markers of UPR activation and reduced coordination with autophagy and SC-associated gene transcripts following a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise. In contrast, young adults demonstrated strong coordination between UPR genes and key regulatory gene transcripts associated with autophagy and SC differentiation in skeletal muscle post-exercise. Taken together, the present findings suggest a potential age-related impairment in the post-exercise transcriptional response that supports activation of the UPR and coordination with other exercise responsive pathways (i.e....
Source: Fight Aging! - September 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

23andMe Moving into Clinical Trial Recruitment, a Potential Source of New Income
I have been blogging about23andMe for about six years (see:Update on 23andMe; Time for a Review of FDA Definition of Medical Devices). During that time, I have seen the company evolve from the first major consumer genomics enterprise to a clinical laboratory authorized by the FDA to perform testing for ten diseases or conditions. These are the first direct-to-consumer (DTC) tests authorized by the FDA that provide information about an individual ’s genetic predisposition to certain medical diseases or conditions (see:FDA allows marketing of first direct-to-consumer tests that provide genetic risk information for...
Source: Lab Soft News - September 27, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Food and Drug Administration Genomic Testing Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Lab Regulation Lab Standards Medical Consumerism Medical Research Pharmaceutical Industry Source Type: blogs

8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall
You're reading 8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Nootropics is a term coined by Dr. Corneliu E. Giurgea to describe a class of drugs, supplements, and other synthetic and naturally occurring compounds that improve cognitive function in our brains. They’re often called “smart drugs,” as they can help us think faster and more efficiently. Although used by pretty much everyone, these nootropic supplements are especially popular among youn...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - September 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nadav Dakner Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement nootropics pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Senescent Cells Implicated in Age-Related Changes in Blood Clotting
In this study, researchers validated the expression of some of the specific factors in cultured cells and in mice, which were treated with doxorubicin, a widely-used chemotherapy drug which induces widespread senescence. Those mice showed increased blood clotting, similar to what happens in humans who undergo chemotherapy. "Conversely, when we selectively removed senescent cells in specially bred transgenic mice, the increased clotting caused by doxorubicin went away." SILAC Analysis Reveals Increased Secretion of Hemostasis-Related Factors by Senescent Cells Cellular senescence irreversibly ar...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

CVS Health: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) apps may help you more than sleeping pills
__________ Sleep Therapy for the Masses May Be Coming to You Soon (The New York Times): “CVS Health wants to help millions of American workers improve their sleep. So for the first time, the big pharmacy benefits manager is offering a purely digital therapy as a possible employee benefit. The company is encouraging employers to cover the costs for their workers to use Sleepio, an Sleepio app featuring a cartoon therapist that delivers behavior modification lessons. CVS Health’s push could help mainstream the nascent business of digital therapeutics, which markets apps to help treat conditions like schizophrenia...
Source: SharpBrains - September 25, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Big Health cognitive-behavioral-therapy CVS Health digital therapeutics digital therapy mental health Novartis sleep sleep aid medications Sleepio Source Type: blogs

Reviewing Changes in Platelet Function in Aging
Platelets are essentially structured chunks of cytoplasm shed by the megakaryocyte cells responsible for producing them, released into the blood stream. They are important in blood clotting and the innate immune response. Inappropriate blood clot formation known as thrombosis occurs more readily in later life, but it is unclear as to the degree to which age-related changes in platelets, versus other systems, are important to this process, or where platelets sit in the complex chains of cause and effect. The open access paper noted here reviews what is known of the aging of platelets and related mechanisms, a topic that is ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

5 Mental Health ‘To Dos’ Parents Need to Add to Their Back-To-School Checklist
As a parent of two, I live by a checklist during the back-to-school season. One, because I enjoy checking items off the list, and two, because I know in order to make my children feel secure in the new academic year I need to ensure they have the tools to prevail with confidence. To successfully do this, there are some key items not related to school supplies or bus routes that parents should consider including on their annual checklist.  If you are like me, every year you make sure your children get their “back to school sports physical.” This is a necessity and is probably at the top of your to-do list &...
Source: World of Psychology - September 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Keita Franklin, LCSW, PhD Tags: Bullying Children and Teens College Communication Parenting Students Success & Achievement Back To School Source Type: blogs

Driving for teens with ADHD: What parents need to know
For all parents, it’s a scary time when their teen starts to drive. For parents of teens with ADHD, it can be — and should be — even scarier. ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, is a condition that can cause problems with attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. These are not problems you want to have when you are driving. What does research tell us about ADHD in teens and driving? In a 2019 study published in Pediatrics, researchers looked at information about accidents, violations, and suspensions over the first four years of licensure for about 15,000 adolescent drivers. About 2,000 of...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Brain and cognitive health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Universal Childcare Could Have Terrible Social Consequences
Some Democratic presidential candidates want to introduce government-funded,universal childcare programs.The stated rationale is usually the need for targeted financial help for families with children. But this reasoning is usually buttressed by a faith that government-funded care or preschool would improve the life chances of the children using it.Such assertions are based on extrapolating research findings frommore limited programs targeted at those on low incomes, such as Head Start, the Perry Preschool Project and the Carolina Abecedarian Project. But assuming these results apply to more universal programs is fraught w...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 30, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

How Teens and Young Adults with ADHD Can Thrive
When Grace Friedman was diagnosed with ADHD at 12 years old, she didn’t know much about it. What she did know was that it was hard to make friends, her emotions seemed to be “on steroids,” and focusing on homework and in class felt impossible. It also was difficult to accept that her brain and body worked differently than the average student’s. It was frustrating that she had to work harder on every assignment, staying up later and later just to finish a few math problems. Friedman was convinced that because of these differences, she wouldn’t be able to succeed. She feared she’d “n...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Books Children and Teens College Disorders General Habits Motivation and Inspiration Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Students Success & Achievement attention Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Self Care self Source Type: blogs

Digital Health Technologies Bring Change To The World Of Autism
People living with autism are sensitive to the social world and the environment in general. They could experience great difficulties in social situations, have anxieties, fears, phobias, or sensory sensitivities. On the other hand, they could be on good terms with technologies: social stories apps can navigate them in difficult situations, virtual and augmented reality can offer a safe space for them to exercise, and artificial intelligence helps in early detection. We scoured the ground carefully and hereby present you the intersections of autism and digital health. Raymond Babbitt’s heritage and the chronicles ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine AI app AR artificial intelligence autism digital digital health digital technology games genetics health app health apps Innovation virtual reality VR Source Type: blogs

Gluteomorphin: The opiate in your food
Yes: there are opiates that derive from various food proteins that exert peculiar effects on the human brain. The worst? The opiates that come from the gliadin protein of wheat and related grains. Opiate receptor researchers at the National Institutes of Health originally coined the term “gluteomorphin” nearly 40 years ago when it was determined that the gliadin protein of wheat undergoes partial digestion (since humans lack the digestive enzymes to fully digest proline-rich amino acid sequences in proteins from seeds of grasses) to yield peptides that are 4- to 5-amino acids long. Some of these peptides w...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 10, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Opioids addictive binge eating bulimia eating disorders Gliadin opiates wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Five Essential Guidelines to Improve Brain Health for All
Since 2010, the SharpBrains Virtual Summit has been bringing together neuroscientists, entrepreneurs, and practitioners with a mission to improve mental healthcare, brain performance and general well-being. As we get ready to host our next collective brainstorming next week, let us share some key themes from our last Summit, as they helped shape the Agenda for this next one. In 2017, the gathering’s tone was generally optimistic–given the explosion of scientific and technological breakthroughs, start-ups and investments–but important ethical concerns were also widely discussed. 1. The Need is Very Real, V...
Source: SharpBrains - May 3, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Peak Performance Professional Development Technology aging brain health brain-performance digital medicine digital phenotyping entrepreneurs healthcare innovati Source Type: blogs

First Drug-Free Option for ADHD Cleared in America
For the first time, children in the United States will have a non-drug option for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The FDA just cleared the Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) System from NeuroSigma, a Los Angeles, California company, to treat ADHD in kids between 7 and 12 years old. The system has already been used to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), epilepsy, and depression. The Monarch delivers low-energy electrical current through an electronic patch attached to the forehead. It creates a tingling sensation, but otherwise there doesn’t seem to be any pain or di...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Pediatrics Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

9 Tips and Tricks for Creating a Calming Bedtime Routine When You Have Kids
It’s safe to say that everyone knows about the importance of having a bedtime routine for helping us get a good night’s sleep. But when you have kids, things can get tricky, because there are plenty of competing factors. Sometimes, it takes forever, plus an hour, to get your child to bed, and by that point, you’re exhausted — and restless. Maybe you find yourself zoning out on the couch or staring at the ceiling, thinking about the 100,000 things you need to do. And maybe you start doing them. Catch up on email. Unload the dishwasher, and load it back up. Sweep. Dust. Fold. Fix that random thi...
Source: World of Psychology - April 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Sleep Bedtime Children Hyperactivity Sleep Habits Sleep Hygiene Source Type: blogs

Crystal Meth Addiction
What is a Crystal Meth Addiction? Crystal meth is the name for the street drug crystal methamphetamine. Crystal meth can also be known as ice or glass, and it can be either snorted, smoked or dissolved and injected. It is a very strong and highly addictive drug. It affects the central nervous system, and crystal meth addiction has dangerous life-threatening effects. Understanding Crystal Meth Crystal meth is a man-made stimulant drug that has no legal use. It is made with methamphetamine, pseudoephedrine and a combination of other chemicals. Methamphetamine has been around for a long time, originally created to keep soldie...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - March 14, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Drug Treatment Methamphetamines Substance Abuse crystal methamphetamine meth addiction Source Type: blogs

Training Your Mind with Meditation
You're reading Training Your Mind with Meditation, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. “Meditation is a science, the systematic process of training the mind.” – John Yates, Ph.D. By sophomore year of high school, it had become clear that my mind was completely out of control. After a series of car crashes resulting from my own distraction and declining grades in school, I was promptly diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and prescribed several medications. This ca...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: liammccl Tags: featured meditation self improvement adhd health pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

8 Vital Ways Dads Can Support Their Partners ’ Mental Health Postpartum
You’ll be bringing your baby home soon. Or maybe you already have. And you want to be there for your spouse. You know that having a baby not only affects your wife’s body, but it also affects her mental health. You want to be supportive, encouraging and helpful. But you’re not exactly sure how to do that. What does it look like to support your spouse’s mental health? Where do you start? What should you avoid? Here, you’ll find suggestions from Kirsten Brunner, MA, LPC, a perinatal mental health and relationship expert. She’s the co-author of The Birth Guy’s Go-To Guide for New D...
Source: World of Psychology - March 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Family Friends General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Child Development Fatherhood Postpartum Source Type: blogs

“Brain Training” Is Supported by Neuroscience
Online computer games promise to improve “memory, problem solving, concentration, speed of thinking, language, and visual-spatial recognition.” They further promise that they “work your social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control” while you’re having fun. These are tempting offers, and this is a very lucrative and growing business in the United States as people age and many older adults seek out ways to maintain cognitive functioning. “Brain training” grew from $600 million in annual revenues in 2009 to more than a $1 billion in 2012 and is projected to reach ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior Neuromyths Brain Training Concentration Memory Skills Neuroscience problem solving speed of thinking visual-spatial recognition Source Type: blogs