Psychology Around the Net: October 12, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes an interesting look at how our shadow selves affect relationships, why death anxiety is keeping men awake, strategies to help boost focus and motivation, and more. New Psychology Research Has Linked Death Anxiety to Bedtime Procrastination: A new study published in The Journal of General Psychology suggests “death anxiety” is a predictor of bedtime procrastination in males. After surveying 229 Turkish participants about their attitudes about death, sleeping behaviors, and self-control, researchers found that men who are bothered by their own mortality are more ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Adhd Brain Scans Children death death anxiety Focus Language Skills Mortality Motivation Relationships shadow self Sleep Spiritual Health Suicidal Behavior Suicide Risk Source Type: blogs

Should pediatricians treat ADHD with medications or behavioral treatment first?
When children are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, stimulant medications like Ritalin or Adderall are usually the first line of treatment. The American Academy of Pediatrics issued new guidelines Monday upholding that central role of medications accompanied by behavioral therapy in ADHD treatment. Some experts say, however, they are disappointed the new guidelines don ’t […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/alex-smith-2" rel="tag" > Alex Smith < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

From Theranos To Google Glass: The Biggest Flops In Digital Health
The tech start-up scene, investors, and news-reading audiences reward great stories on the edge of human capabilities – sometimes even on the boundary of science and science fiction – with their attention, money, or invested energy. However, sometimes marketing machines are better than actual technologies, and the ‘little bubbles’ around companies burst. Here, we collected the most promising digital health ideas and companies over the years that proved to be the greatest flops in medical innovation so far. ‘Big little bubbles’ that turned into digital health failures Humans love g...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers AI artificial intelligence companies development device digital digital health digital health market gadgets google google glass hype Innovation invention medical device promis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 30th 2019
In conclusion, older adults exhibited decreased markers of UPR activation and reduced coordination with autophagy and SC-associated gene transcripts following a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise. In contrast, young adults demonstrated strong coordination between UPR genes and key regulatory gene transcripts associated with autophagy and SC differentiation in skeletal muscle post-exercise. Taken together, the present findings suggest a potential age-related impairment in the post-exercise transcriptional response that supports activation of the UPR and coordination with other exercise responsive pathways (i.e....
Source: Fight Aging! - September 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

23andMe Moving into Clinical Trial Recruitment, a Potential Source of New Income
I have been blogging about23andMe for about six years (see:Update on 23andMe; Time for a Review of FDA Definition of Medical Devices). During that time, I have seen the company evolve from the first major consumer genomics enterprise to a clinical laboratory authorized by the FDA to perform testing for ten diseases or conditions. These are the first direct-to-consumer (DTC) tests authorized by the FDA that provide information about an individual ’s genetic predisposition to certain medical diseases or conditions (see:FDA allows marketing of first direct-to-consumer tests that provide genetic risk information for...
Source: Lab Soft News - September 27, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Food and Drug Administration Genomic Testing Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Lab Regulation Lab Standards Medical Consumerism Medical Research Pharmaceutical Industry Source Type: blogs

8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall
You're reading 8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Nootropics is a term coined by Dr. Corneliu E. Giurgea to describe a class of drugs, supplements, and other synthetic and naturally occurring compounds that improve cognitive function in our brains. They’re often called “smart drugs,” as they can help us think faster and more efficiently. Although used by pretty much everyone, these nootropic supplements are especially popular among youn...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - September 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nadav Dakner Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement nootropics pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Senescent Cells Implicated in Age-Related Changes in Blood Clotting
In this study, researchers validated the expression of some of the specific factors in cultured cells and in mice, which were treated with doxorubicin, a widely-used chemotherapy drug which induces widespread senescence. Those mice showed increased blood clotting, similar to what happens in humans who undergo chemotherapy. "Conversely, when we selectively removed senescent cells in specially bred transgenic mice, the increased clotting caused by doxorubicin went away." SILAC Analysis Reveals Increased Secretion of Hemostasis-Related Factors by Senescent Cells Cellular senescence irreversibly ar...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

CVS Health: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) apps may help you more than sleeping pills
__________ Sleep Therapy for the Masses May Be Coming to You Soon (The New York Times): “CVS Health wants to help millions of American workers improve their sleep. So for the first time, the big pharmacy benefits manager is offering a purely digital therapy as a possible employee benefit. The company is encouraging employers to cover the costs for their workers to use Sleepio, an Sleepio app featuring a cartoon therapist that delivers behavior modification lessons. CVS Health’s push could help mainstream the nascent business of digital therapeutics, which markets apps to help treat conditions like schizophrenia...
Source: SharpBrains - September 25, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Big Health cognitive-behavioral-therapy CVS Health digital therapeutics digital therapy mental health Novartis sleep sleep aid medications Sleepio Source Type: blogs

Reviewing Changes in Platelet Function in Aging
Platelets are essentially structured chunks of cytoplasm shed by the megakaryocyte cells responsible for producing them, released into the blood stream. They are important in blood clotting and the innate immune response. Inappropriate blood clot formation known as thrombosis occurs more readily in later life, but it is unclear as to the degree to which age-related changes in platelets, versus other systems, are important to this process, or where platelets sit in the complex chains of cause and effect. The open access paper noted here reviews what is known of the aging of platelets and related mechanisms, a topic that is ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

5 Mental Health ‘To Dos’ Parents Need to Add to Their Back-To-School Checklist
As a parent of two, I live by a checklist during the back-to-school season. One, because I enjoy checking items off the list, and two, because I know in order to make my children feel secure in the new academic year I need to ensure they have the tools to prevail with confidence. To successfully do this, there are some key items not related to school supplies or bus routes that parents should consider including on their annual checklist.  If you are like me, every year you make sure your children get their “back to school sports physical.” This is a necessity and is probably at the top of your to-do list &...
Source: World of Psychology - September 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Keita Franklin, LCSW, PhD Tags: Bullying Children and Teens College Communication Parenting Students Success & Achievement Back To School Source Type: blogs

Driving for teens with ADHD: What parents need to know
For all parents, it’s a scary time when their teen starts to drive. For parents of teens with ADHD, it can be — and should be — even scarier. ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, is a condition that can cause problems with attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. These are not problems you want to have when you are driving. What does research tell us about ADHD in teens and driving? In a 2019 study published in Pediatrics, researchers looked at information about accidents, violations, and suspensions over the first four years of licensure for about 15,000 adolescent drivers. About 2,000 of...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Brain and cognitive health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Universal Childcare Could Have Terrible Social Consequences
Some Democratic presidential candidates want to introduce government-funded,universal childcare programs.The stated rationale is usually the need for targeted financial help for families with children. But this reasoning is usually buttressed by a faith that government-funded care or preschool would improve the life chances of the children using it.Such assertions are based on extrapolating research findings frommore limited programs targeted at those on low incomes, such as Head Start, the Perry Preschool Project and the Carolina Abecedarian Project. But assuming these results apply to more universal programs is fraught w...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 30, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

How Teens and Young Adults with ADHD Can Thrive
When Grace Friedman was diagnosed with ADHD at 12 years old, she didn’t know much about it. What she did know was that it was hard to make friends, her emotions seemed to be “on steroids,” and focusing on homework and in class felt impossible. It also was difficult to accept that her brain and body worked differently than the average student’s. It was frustrating that she had to work harder on every assignment, staying up later and later just to finish a few math problems. Friedman was convinced that because of these differences, she wouldn’t be able to succeed. She feared she’d “n...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Books Children and Teens College Disorders General Habits Motivation and Inspiration Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Students Success & Achievement attention Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Self Care self Source Type: blogs

Digital Health Technologies Bring Change To The World Of Autism
People living with autism are sensitive to the social world and the environment in general. They could experience great difficulties in social situations, have anxieties, fears, phobias, or sensory sensitivities. On the other hand, they could be on good terms with technologies: social stories apps can navigate them in difficult situations, virtual and augmented reality can offer a safe space for them to exercise, and artificial intelligence helps in early detection. We scoured the ground carefully and hereby present you the intersections of autism and digital health. Raymond Babbitt’s heritage and the chronicles ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine AI app AR artificial intelligence autism digital digital health digital technology games genetics health app health apps Innovation virtual reality VR Source Type: blogs

Gluteomorphin: The opiate in your food
Yes: there are opiates that derive from various food proteins that exert peculiar effects on the human brain. The worst? The opiates that come from the gliadin protein of wheat and related grains. Opiate receptor researchers at the National Institutes of Health originally coined the term “gluteomorphin” nearly 40 years ago when it was determined that the gliadin protein of wheat undergoes partial digestion (since humans lack the digestive enzymes to fully digest proline-rich amino acid sequences in proteins from seeds of grasses) to yield peptides that are 4- to 5-amino acids long. Some of these peptides w...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 11, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Opioids addictive binge eating bulimia eating disorders Gliadin opiates wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Five Essential Guidelines to Improve Brain Health for All
Since 2010, the SharpBrains Virtual Summit has been bringing together neuroscientists, entrepreneurs, and practitioners with a mission to improve mental healthcare, brain performance and general well-being. As we get ready to host our next collective brainstorming next week, let us share some key themes from our last Summit, as they helped shape the Agenda for this next one. In 2017, the gathering’s tone was generally optimistic–given the explosion of scientific and technological breakthroughs, start-ups and investments–but important ethical concerns were also widely discussed. 1. The Need is Very Real, V...
Source: SharpBrains - May 3, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Peak Performance Professional Development Technology aging brain health brain-performance digital medicine digital phenotyping entrepreneurs healthcare innovati Source Type: blogs

First Drug-Free Option for ADHD Cleared in America
For the first time, children in the United States will have a non-drug option for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The FDA just cleared the Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) System from NeuroSigma, a Los Angeles, California company, to treat ADHD in kids between 7 and 12 years old. The system has already been used to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), epilepsy, and depression. The Monarch delivers low-energy electrical current through an electronic patch attached to the forehead. It creates a tingling sensation, but otherwise there doesn’t seem to be any pain or di...
Source: Medgadget - April 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Pediatrics Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

9 Tips and Tricks for Creating a Calming Bedtime Routine When You Have Kids
It’s safe to say that everyone knows about the importance of having a bedtime routine for helping us get a good night’s sleep. But when you have kids, things can get tricky, because there are plenty of competing factors. Sometimes, it takes forever, plus an hour, to get your child to bed, and by that point, you’re exhausted — and restless. Maybe you find yourself zoning out on the couch or staring at the ceiling, thinking about the 100,000 things you need to do. And maybe you start doing them. Catch up on email. Unload the dishwasher, and load it back up. Sweep. Dust. Fold. Fix that random thi...
Source: World of Psychology - April 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Sleep Bedtime Children Hyperactivity Sleep Habits Sleep Hygiene Source Type: blogs

Crystal Meth Addiction
What is a Crystal Meth Addiction? Crystal meth is the name for the street drug crystal methamphetamine. Crystal meth can also be known as ice or glass, and it can be either snorted, smoked or dissolved and injected. It is a very strong and highly addictive drug. It affects the central nervous system, and crystal meth addiction has dangerous life-threatening effects. Understanding Crystal Meth Crystal meth is a man-made stimulant drug that has no legal use. It is made with methamphetamine, pseudoephedrine and a combination of other chemicals. Methamphetamine has been around for a long time, originally created to keep soldie...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - March 14, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Drug Treatment Methamphetamines Substance Abuse crystal methamphetamine meth addiction Source Type: blogs

Training Your Mind with Meditation
You're reading Training Your Mind with Meditation, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. “Meditation is a science, the systematic process of training the mind.” – John Yates, Ph.D. By sophomore year of high school, it had become clear that my mind was completely out of control. After a series of car crashes resulting from my own distraction and declining grades in school, I was promptly diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and prescribed several medications. This ca...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: liammccl Tags: featured meditation self improvement adhd health pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

8 Vital Ways Dads Can Support Their Partners ’ Mental Health Postpartum
You’ll be bringing your baby home soon. Or maybe you already have. And you want to be there for your spouse. You know that having a baby not only affects your wife’s body, but it also affects her mental health. You want to be supportive, encouraging and helpful. But you’re not exactly sure how to do that. What does it look like to support your spouse’s mental health? Where do you start? What should you avoid? Here, you’ll find suggestions from Kirsten Brunner, MA, LPC, a perinatal mental health and relationship expert. She’s the co-author of The Birth Guy’s Go-To Guide for New D...
Source: World of Psychology - March 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Family Friends General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Child Development Fatherhood Postpartum Source Type: blogs

“Brain Training” Is Supported by Neuroscience
Online computer games promise to improve “memory, problem solving, concentration, speed of thinking, language, and visual-spatial recognition.” They further promise that they “work your social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control” while you’re having fun. These are tempting offers, and this is a very lucrative and growing business in the United States as people age and many older adults seek out ways to maintain cognitive functioning. “Brain training” grew from $600 million in annual revenues in 2009 to more than a $1 billion in 2012 and is projected to reach ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior Neuromyths Brain Training Concentration Memory Skills Neuroscience problem solving speed of thinking visual-spatial recognition Source Type: blogs

Neuromyth: “Brain Training” Is Supported by Neuroscience
Online computer games promise to improve “memory, problem solving, concentration, speed of thinking, language, and visual-spatial recognition.” They further promise that they “work your social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control” while you’re having fun. These are tempting offers, and this is a very lucrative and growing business in the United States as people age and many older adults seek out ways to maintain cognitive functioning. “Brain training” grew from $600 million in annual revenues in 2009 to more than a $1 billion in 2012 and is projected to reach ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior Neuromyths Brain Training Concentration Memory Skills Neuroscience problem solving speed of thinking visual-spatial recognition Source Type: blogs

ADHD: Parenting Beyond Behavior, Beliefs, and Grades
When we look at the whole story of children diagnosed with ADHD, we find that hindsight reveals deeper challenges that have not received attention. While the average age of presentation is between 3 to 6 years of age with the average age of diagnosis coming at 7 years of age, developmentally, other pictures emerge. In taking history we learn of symptoms and challenges that were present from an early age. Eventually, those children diagnosed (and undiagnosed) have endured labels very different from the ones many parents do not want (ADHD, ODD, etc.). Most of these other identifiers come within relationships with peers, with...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John C. Panepinto, PsyD, LPCS, NCC Tags: ADHD and ADD Children and Teens Self-Esteem Stigma Students Success & Achievement grades Parenting School Performance Source Type: blogs

Be careful of assigning the diagnosis of ADHD to young children just entering school
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common diagnosis in children today, and is increasingly a diagnosis assigned to adults, too. ADHD is a real thing, despite some having some skeptics and a few outright denialists; differences in brain scans between persons who have it and who don ’t show there is a definite physiological basis […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 19, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christopher-johnson" rel="tag" > Christopher Johnson, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Frequent Problem Behavior in Your Child? This Might Be Why
Having to deal with problem behavior in your child can leave you feeling frustrated and helpless. But what if this behavior was sparked by anxiety? A number of studies have found that children’s inability to process difficult emotions often leads to what commonly comes across as “problem” behavior. This may look like uncontrollable tantrums, unpredictability and impulsiveness, extreme clinginess, an inability to do what is expected (for example, an inability to follow simple instructions in school or at home), developmental difficulties, uncontrollable anger, extreme reactions, defiance and aggressive or...
Source: World of Psychology - February 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sanya Pelini, PhD Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens Parenting Students Success & Achievement Bad Behavior Child Development Discipline Source Type: blogs

CBD Oil for Depression, Schizophrenia, ADHD, PTSD, Anxiety, Bipolar & More
In conclusion, the studies presented in the current review demonstrate that CBD has the potential to limit delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairment and improve cognitive function in various pathological conditions. Human studies suggest that CBD may have a protective role in delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairments; however, there is limited human evidence for CBD treatment effects in pathological states (e.g. schizophrenia). In short, they found that CBD may help alleviate the negative impact of a person with schizophrenia from taking cannabis, both in the psychotic and cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia. T...
Source: World of Psychology - February 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Disorders General Research Treatment cannabidiol Cannabis cbd cbd oil Marijuana THC Source Type: blogs

Brain training seen as promising non-pharmacological method to enhance attention in healthy young adults
This brain training app may help you stay focused, says new study (CNN): “Our digital lives make concentration difficult…A group of Cambridge university researchers believes to have developed a “fun” solution to this modern problem. By playing a “brain training” game, called Decoder, players can increase their concentration. In order to test the game’s effect, the research team conducted a study published Monday in the journal Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience. For the study, 75 healthy participants were split into three groups: one that played Decoder, one th...
Source: SharpBrains - February 1, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness adhd Brain-Training brain-training-app Decoder improve-concentration Neuropsychology non-pharmacological Ritalin Source Type: blogs

New Findings Could Help Explain Why ADHD Is Often Overlooked In Girls
By Emma Young For every girl with ADHD, there are three boys with the same diagnosis. But among adults, the gender ratio is more like 1:1. That’s a big discrepancy. So what’s going on?  In 2017, Aja Louise Murray and colleagues investigated possible predictors of childhood vs. later (adolescent/adult-onset) ADHD, and they found hints that girls tend to develop ADHD at a later age than boys. Now a team that includes the same researchers has investigated this explicitly and in their paper in Developmental Science, they’ve confirmed it seems to be the case, which could partially explain the discrepancy ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: ADHD Gender Source Type: blogs

Younger kindergarteners more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD
In a class of kindergarteners, a child born in August is about 30% more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and 25% more likely to be treated for it, than a child born in September — if you have to be 5 years old by September 1st to start kindergarten. These were the findings of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. They didn’t find such a difference between any two other months — and in schools that didn’t have a September 1 cutoff for entry, the difference between August and September disappeared. It’s not a Leo versus Virgo thing:...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

If you or your kid have ADHD, do have a treatment monitoring plan in place for the New Year?
When a child is diagnosed with ADHD, parents confront the difficult decision about which treatment(s) to pursue to best help their child succeed. While deciding on an initial treatment plan is important, equally important is establishing a plan to monitor how well that treatment is working on a sustained basis, regardless of what specific treatment(s) is being used. This is because children’s response to ADHD treatment often changes over time and a strong initial treatment response – be that medication treatment, behavior therapy, dietary treatment, etc., — provides no assurance that important treatment b...
Source: SharpBrains - January 11, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD hyperactivity impulsivity monitoring Source Type: blogs

Time For A Fresh Approach To Learning Difficulties? The Cognitive Profile Of Kids Struggling At School Bore No Relation To Their Official Diagnoses
The study used “machine learning” to organise children into clusters based on their cognitive profiles. (Figure 4 reproduced from Astle et al, 2018. See their open-access paper for description.) By Emma Young Around 30 per cent of British children fail to meet expected targets in reading or maths at age 11. These children face a future of continuing difficulties in education, as well as poorer mental health and employment success. Understanding why some kids struggle – and providing them with tailored support as early as possible – is clearly vital. Some will be diagnosed with a specific disorder, s...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Developmental Educational Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 7th 2019
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Tau and Amyloid- β Synergize to Impair Neural Activity in Alzheimer's Disease
The mainstream of the Alzheimer's research community remains primarily interested in clearing deposits of amyloid-β from the aging brain. That said, there is a growing interest in tackling tau aggregation as well, particularly given the long years of failure to achieve meaningful results through clinical trials of immunotherapies that target amyloid-β. The current consensus on the development of the disease is that increased amyloid-β, leading to solid deposits of amyloid in and between cells, is an early phenomenon, and may in and of itself do little more than create mild cognitive impairment. However, amyl...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Psychological & Environmental Components That Lead to Behavioral Disorders in Teens
Even the most well-behaved teens can have moments where they’re difficult and challenging, pushing their parents’ buttons and testing boundaries. It’s a normal part of growing up and becoming autonomous individuals. However, parents sometimes notice a much more serious pattern of ongoing negative behavior from their teens. The teenager becomes uncooperative, hostile, defiant and argumentative especially towards authority figures. These behaviors end up disrupting not only the teens’ life but also their families’, interrupting their daily functioning. With time, these behaviors become more ext...
Source: World of Psychology - December 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Students Conduct Disorder Juvenile Delinquency Neurobehavioral Disorder Oppositional Defiant Disorder Source Type: blogs

3 Effective Ways to Beat Morning Depression
This article is for general educational purposes only and should not be relied upon as a substitute for individual professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you need help for an emotional or behavioural problem, please seek the assistance of a psychologist or other qualified mental health professional Greg is the director at Counselling in Melbourne, a private counselling practice in Melbourne, Australia. Greg has been involved in the medical profession for many years, and has immediate family members who also have also chosen careers in the medical field such as Theater Nurse, Midwife Sister Paramedic, GP and On...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Greg Melbourne Tags: featured self improvement depression morning morning routine pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Large study with twins highlights the limited role of genetics in mental health and the importance of effective early interventions for ADHD
CONCLUSIONS: Long-term associations of childhood ADHD with adverse physical health and socioeconomic outcomes underscore the need for early intervention. Young adult ADHD showed stronger associations with poorer mental health, substance misuse and psychosocial outcomes, emphasising the importance of identifying and treating adults with ADHD. The Study in Context: Neurofeedback or medication to treat ADHD? What are cognitive abilities and how to boost them? Rates of ADHD diagnosis and medication treatment continue to increase substantially (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - November 28, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness ADHD symptopms attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Genetics mental health problems psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Mental health of children and young people in England, 2017
NHS Digital - This survey collected information from 9,117 children and young people and combines information - depending on their age - from children and young people or their parents and teachers. It found that one in eight (12.8 per cent) of children and young people aged between five and 19, surveyed in England in 2017, had a mental disorder. Mental disorders were grouped into four broad categories - emotional, behavioural, hyperactivity and other less common disorders.SurveyPress release  (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - November 26, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 19th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

mTORC1 at the Intersection of Aging and Type 2 Diabetes
For the vast majority of patients, type 2 diabetes is caused by the presence of excess visceral fat tissue, and can be reversed even at a late stage by losing that fat tissue. The degree to which one needs to abuse one's own body in order to become diabetic falls with advancing age, however. Aging makes type 2 diabetes more likely to occur, all other factors being equal. Looking at the relationship from the other direction, the chronic inflammation and other forms of metabolic dysfunction characteristic of type 2 diabetes accelerates the progression of aging. The condition shortens life expectancy and is associated with gr...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Intensive CBT: How fast can I get better?
A highly effective psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on how our thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes can affect our feelings and behavior. Traditional CBT treatment usually requires weekly 30- to 60-minute sessions over 12 to 20 weeks. A faster option now emerging is intensive CBT (I-CBT), which employs much longer sessions concentrated into a month, week, or weekend — or sometimes a single eight-hour session. CBT helps people learn tools to reframe different types of thinking, such as black-and-white thinking (I can’t do anything right) and emotional reasoning (I feel you dislike me, ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Soo Jeong Youn, PhD Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

New evidence that the “chaotic mind” of ADHD brings creative advantages
Participant drawings from White, 2018 By Christian Jarrett Focus and concentration, while normally considered beneficial attributes, can stymie creativity – especially the generation of novel ideas. This has led some to wonder whether people with “leaky attention“, and especially those with ADHD – who have what Holly White, writing recently in the Journal of Creative Behaviour, calls “chaotic minds” – might have a creative advantage when it comes to breaking free from prior examples. White, who is based at the University of Michigan, has tested this possibility, and thoug...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: ADHD Creativity Source Type: blogs

Brain Sensing Tech Support to Mindfulness – The Muse Review
Do you want to control your brain? The Muse brain sensing headband promises to help you get the most out of your meditation practice by giving you real-time biofeedback about what’s going on in your mind. It’s not some dystopian headset trying to alter your brain. Instead, its makers, the InteraXon team, want to train you to modify it yourself by knowing your brain activity better. Here you find our experience with the headband – even the comparison for the early and latest versions: our big fat Muse review. Measuring brainwave activity? Really? How? For answering that question, we have to introduce you t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 18, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Medical Professionals Patients Researchers digital health future headband health technology Innovation Medicine meditation mental health mindfulness muse review stress stress release Source Type: blogs

Neurofeedback or medication to treat ADHD?
CONCLUSION: Neurofeedback is a promising alternative treatment for ADHD in children who do not respond to or experience significant adverse effects from ADHD medication. (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - October 17, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness brainwave medication methylphenidate Neurofeedback Ritalin Source Type: blogs

The decision to not vaccinate is driven by fear and misinformation
I was browsing the internet one day and came across a photo of a group of women who appeared educated and influential. They were wearing blue T-shirts with claims that vaccines cause autoimmune diseases, seizures, ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, death, autism, sudden infant death syndrome and infertility. I couldn’t help but laugh at them! I shared this photo on my Facebook page. To my surprise, one of my educated friends shared her concern about vaccinations and declared that she had withheld immunization from her own children. I decided to write this paper for young women li...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lubna-mirza" rel="tag" > Lubna Mirza, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Co-Occurring Mental Health and Addiction
What is a Co-Occuring disorder? The coexistence of both a mental health disorder and a substance abuse use disorder is referred to as a co-occurring disorder. Any combination of mental health and addiction can be referred to as having a co-occuring disorder. The combinations can be seemingly endless, and can even include more than one of either a mental disorder or an addiction. Combinations may include depression and alcoholism, anorexia and cocaine addiction, bipolar disorder and heroin addiction and the list goes on. Surprisingly, as many as 6 in 10 substance abusers also have at least one other mental disorder. There i...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - September 27, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources ADHD Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Anxiety Behavioral Addictions Depression Depression Treatment Drinking Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eat Source Type: blogs

Parents Guide for Disciplining Kids with ADHD
Receiving our son’s diagnosis of ADHD shed light as to why standard parenting advice wasn’t really working in our home. Understanding our son’s non-neurotypical condition enabled us to be more effective parents as we researched beneficial parenting techniques for children with ADHD. For those parents who have been struggling to discipline their children with ADHD, I will go through the research we found which revolutionized our parenting practices and helped our son improve his behavior. Discipline Starts with the Parents’ Personal Discipline The behavioral foundation for any child starts in the ho...
Source: World of Psychology - September 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: ADHD and ADD Children and Teens Parenting Students Success & Achievement Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Discipline Reinforcement Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 3rd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

ADHD and Addiction
What is ADHD? ADHD is a behavioral disorder, which stands for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. It is a condition that either makes it difficult to keep mental focus on a single topic, control the impulse to act out, or both. While it can be diagnosed as an adult, people with ADHD are usually diagnosed in childhood. This is the period of time in one’s life when symptoms become most prevalent. Children with ADHD are often misunderstood and looked at as troublemakers or class clowns in school. It’s difficult for them to stay still, to focus and to control their impulses while in the classroom. ADHD sympto...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - August 30, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Stories ADHD Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eating Disorder Treatment behavioral disorder Source Type: blogs

The Futility of Attempts to Rigorously Distinguish Age-Related Disease from Aging
Aging is caused by damage. Age-related diseases are the end result of sizable amounts of that damage, branched out into a network of interacting downstream consequences and system failures. Aging and age-related disease are points on a continuum; age-related disease is an integral part of aging. Yet the predominant way in which researchers and clinicians view aging and age related disease remains one in which an artificial, arbitrary line is drawn between these two things. There is "normal aging" and there is disease. What to make of this when there is very little difference between the level of damage and dysfun...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 29, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs