New discovery is a step towards developing Huntington's disease treatments bef
(University of Surrey) Early warning signs of Huntington's disease have been uncovered in sheep carrying the human HD mutation, leading the way for new insight into this devastating illness, a new study in Scientific Reports has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How Huntington's Disease ravaged a young mother
Heartbreaking images show the ravaging effects of Huntington's Disease, after 20-year-old Becky Aspinall, from Oxton, Merseyside was diagnosed eight years ago and can no longer walk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Licata Enterprises Asks For Volunary Recall of Multiple Vitamin Because of A Possible Fish Allergen Health Risk
Licata Enterprieses of Huntington Beach, California is recalling its The Supreme One / Theravits 100 multiple vitamin (all lots) due to the discovery of a confusing labeling issue which could cause cause individuals allergic to fish oils to ingest the product in error. The product contains Vitamin A (partially from fish liver oil) which is clearly stated in the Supplement Facts portion of the label; however, another part of some labels also incorrectly state “... contains no common allergens” leading some with fish allergies to believe the product is safe for them. Further, the separate Allergen statement c...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 17, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

[Research Article] Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen
Producing metallic hydrogen has been a great challenge in condensed matter physics. Metallic hydrogen may be a room-temperature superconductor and metastable when the pressure is released and could have an important impact on energy and rocketry. We have studied solid molecular hydrogen under pressure at low temperatures. At a pressure of 495 gigapascals, hydrogen becomes metallic, with reflectivity as high as 0.91. We fit the reflectance using a Drude free-electron model to determine the plasma frequency of 32.5 ± 2.1 electron volts at a temperature of 5.5 kelvin, with a corresponding electron carrier density of 7....
Source: ScienceNOW - February 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ranga P. Dias Source Type: news

Cellular quality control process could be Huntington's disease drug target
The loss of motor function and mental acuity associated with Huntington's disease might be treatable by restoring a cellular quality control process, which researchers have identified as a key factor in the degenerative illness. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 13, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cellular quality control process could be Huntington's disease drug target
(Duke University Medical Center) The loss of motor function and mental acuity associated with Huntington's disease might be treatable by restoring a cellular quality control process, which Duke Health researchers have identified as a key factor in the degenerative illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

There's No Silver Bullet For Solving School Lunch
Some seven years ago, British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver traveled to Huntington, West Virginia, on a mission: To save the residents of the so-called “fattest and unhealthiest” U.S. city from themselves. As Oliver’s ABC reality show, “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” told the story, the residents of Huntington were slowly being killed by the fatty, fried foods dominating the menus of their city’s school cafeterias. And as the cameras rolled, he was going to put a stop to it. Of course, it didn’t work out that way. Students were unhappy with the changes Oliver made to the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain Cells Of 'Villainous Character' Might Explain Diseases Like Parkinson's
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain Cells Of 'Villainous Character' Might Explain Diseases Like Parkinson's
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Thief Steals Needles from Cabell County Ambulance
jwplayer.key="Xb4pq7jNsbZ4Vfx+msWU558xEnsZPO4TpfmMIQ==";  jwplayer("player").setup({title: "Thief steals needles from Cabell County ambulance",mediaid: "Thief steals needles from Cabell County ambulance_6db35e65e4c34c76b9c4c04540d33349",file:"https://d2pvyxdw30n8fd.cloudfront.net/WSAZ/v5882aec78367e/6db35e65e4c34c76b9c4c04540d33349-HD.mp4",image:"https://d2pvyxdw30n8fd.cloudfront.net/WSAZ/v5882aec78367e/6db35e65e4c34c76b9c4c04540d33349.jpg",tracks: [{file: "https://d2pvyxdw30n8fd.cloudfront.net/WSAZ/v5882aec78367e/6db35e65e4c34c76b9c4c04540d33349-Unknow...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 23, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WSAZ Tags: News Videos Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Source Type: news

Chip ’n Dipped Voluntarily Expands Recall to Include 7 More of it’s Dark Chocolate Bars Due to Possible Presence of Undeclared Milk
Chip ’n Dipped of Huntington, NY, is expanding its recall of it’s dark chocolate bars to include, Dark Chocolate Almond, 63% Dark Chocolate, Dark Chocolate Pretzel, Hot Dark Chocolate Habanero, Dark Chocolate Marshmallow, Extra Dark Chocolate 72%& Super Smooth Dark Chocolate 86%. People who have allergies to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reactions if they consume these products. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - January 20, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Chip ’n Dipped Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Milk in " Dark Chocolate Crunch Bar "
Chip ’n Dipped of Huntington, NY, is recalling its 2.9-oz. bar, Dark Chocolate Crunch because they may contain undeclared milk. People who have allergies to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reactions if they consume these products. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - January 11, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Single protein may hold secret to treating Parkinson's disease and more
New details about a key cellular protein could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and ALS. At their root, these disorders are triggered by misbehaving proteins in the brain. The proteins misfold and accumulate in neurons, eventually killing the cells. In a new study, researchers used a different protein, Nrf2, to restore levels of the disease-causing proteins to a normal, healthy range, thereby preventing cell death. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Risk factors for suicidal ideation in people at risk for Huntington's disease - Anderson KE, Eberly S, Groves M, Kayson E, Marder K, Young AB, Shoulson I.
BACKGROUND: Suicidal ideation (SI) and attempts are increased in Huntington's disease (HD), making risk factor assessment a priority. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether, hopelessness, irritability, aggression, anxiety, CAG expansion status, depression... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Single protein may hold secret to treating Parkinson's disease and more
(Gladstone Institutes) New details about a key cellular protein could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and ALS. At their root, these disorders are triggered by misbehaving proteins in the brain. The proteins misfold and accumulate in neurons, eventually killing the cells. In a new study, researchers at the Gladstone Institutes used a different protein, Nrf2, to restore levels of the disease-causing proteins to a normal, healthy range, thereby preventing cell death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Huntington's disease linked to brain structure dysfunction
Amy WallaceEVANSTON, Ill., Dec. 21 (UPI) -- Scientists have identified a link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of a part of the brain responsible for movement and impulse control. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Huntington's disease linked to dysfunction of brain structure
Scientists have identified a link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of the subthalamic nucleus, a component of the basal ganglia, a group of brain structures critical for movement and impulse control. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Huntington's disease linked to dysfunction of brain structure
(Northwestern University) Scientists have identified a link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of the subthalamic nucleus, a component of the basal ganglia, a group of brain structures critical for movement and impulse control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[In Depth] Antisense rescues babies from killer disease
Spinal muscular atrophy, the leading inherited killer of children, has forced generations of parents to watch their kids become progressively weaker and, in severe cases, die by about their second birthdays. The recessively inherited disease inexorably destroys the motor neurons of the spinal cord and brain stem, hobbling muscle movement, including breathing. But now, building on a deep understanding of the biology of the disease, biologists have produced a breakthrough drug that is on the brink of regulatory approval. Nusinersen is an antisense therapy that restores cells' ability to make a protein that is vital...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Meredith Wadman Tags: Biomedicine Source Type: news

Verily launches Liftware smart utensils
Verily Life Sciences, the healthcare play owned by Google parent Alphabet (NSDQ:GOOGL), said this week it launched the Liftware Level smart utensil designed to aid individuals with limited hand or arm mobility. The Liftware Level is designed to help individuals who have hand and arm mobility issues, including those with cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, Huntington’s disease or post-stroke deficits. The device operates by constantly monitoring the position of the hand, based on the handle, and intelligently adjusting the angle of the utensil, either a spoon or fork, so the user can ea...
Source: Mass Device - December 8, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Verily Source Type: news

How Fasting Allows The Brain To Recharge Itself
We know that fasting can be great for the body, with benefits including improved metabolic health, increased longevity and better heart health, but we’re still figuring out what kind of role it could play in a healthy lifestyle. Preliminary research shows it could also do your brain good ― especially if you’re at risk for neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.  Scientists at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging have shown, for the first time, how fasting benefits the brain on a neurological level.  There are many different techniques and sch...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Fasting Allows The Brain To Recharge Itself
We know that fasting can be great for the body, with benefits including improved metabolic health, increased longevity and better heart health, but we’re still figuring out what kind of role it could play in a healthy lifestyle. Preliminary research shows it could also do your brain good ― especially if you’re at risk for neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.  Scientists at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging have shown, for the first time, how fasting benefits the brain on a neurological level.  There are many different techniques and sch...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Huntington's disease affects muscle as well as brain
After studying cell processes in mice, researchers suggest Huntington ’s disease involves defects in muscle maturation as well as death of brain cells. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Huntington's Disease Source Type: news

Scripps Florida scientists pinpoint regulator of amphetamine induced motor activity
In new findings that could have an impact on the development of therapies for a number of currently untreatable brain disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, scientists from the... (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - November 21, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

NINDS Chief Sees Hope for Huntington's Tx
(MedPage Today) -- Walter Koroshetz, MD, talks antisense (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - November 17, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Scripps Florida scientists pinpoint regulator of amphetamine induced motor activity
(Scripps Research Institute) In new findings that could have an impact the development of therapies for a number of currently untreatable brain disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found, for the first time, that a specific signaling circuit in the brain is deeply involved in motor activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Your Flu Risk May Depend On When You Were Born
The year in which you were born may predict your risk of getting some types of the flu, a new study of people in Asia and the Middle East suggests. Researchers found that the people in this study who were born before 1968 were less susceptible to a certain strain of the flu than those born in 1968 or later, because this older group had been more exposed to a similar strain as children. In the study, the researchers looked at data from more than 1,400 people, predominantly in Asia and the Middle East, who had been infected at any point in their lives with two strains of the bird flu called H5N1 and H7N9. The new findings co...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hunt for Huntington's cause yields clues
Scientists have uncovered new details about how a repeating nucleotide sequence in the gene for a mutant protein may trigger Huntington's and other neurological diseases. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hunt for Huntington's cause yields clues
(Rice University) Rice University scientists have uncovered new details about how a repeating sequence in a mutant protein may trigger Huntington's and other neurological diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The messenger in Huntington's disease
A research effort reveals new molecular mechanisms of Huntington ’s disease. The results question the approaches used up to now for treatment of the disease. They also point to messenger RNA as a key pathogenic component that will make it possible to define new therapeutic strategies. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The messenger in Huntington's disease
(Center for Genomic Regulation) A research effort led by Eul à lia Mart í at the Centre for Genomic Regulation reveals new molecular mechanisms of Huntington's chorea. The results, recently published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, question the approaches used up to now for treatment of the disease. They also point to messenger RNA as a key pathogenic component that will make it possible to define new therapeutic strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study identifies new biomarkers for Huntington's disease
Researchers have identified several new biological markers to measure the progression of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder Huntington ’s disease. Their findings could benefit clinical trials that test new treatments for the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Changes in mental state and behaviour in Huntington's disease - Eddy CM, Parkinson EG, Rickards HE.
Changes in mental state and behaviour have been acknowledged in Huntington's disease since the original monograph in 1872 provided evidence of disinhibition and impaired social cognition. Behavioural problems can manifest before obvious motor symptoms and ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

C-Path and CHDI establish a consortium to expedite approval of HD therapeutics
(The Critical Path Institute (C-Path)) C-Path and CHDI are collaborating to set up a Huntington's Disease Regulatory Science Consortium (HD-RSC), bringing together participants from within and without the HD community to advance drug development tools and facilitate clinical data standardization and collaboration. 'The need for C-Path's expertise in consortium building and regulatory science has become increasingly apparent as our community sees a number of high-quality therapeutic programs approach the clinic,' says Robi Blumenstein, President of CHDI Management, Inc. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 31, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Japanese scientist wins Nobel medicine prize for work on “ self-eating ” cell mechanism
(Reuters) – Japan’s Yoshinori Ohsumi won the 2016 Nobel prize for medicine for ground-breaking experiments with yeast which exposed a key mechanism in the body’s defenses where cells degrade and recycle their components. Understanding the science behind the process, called “autophagy” or “self-eating”, has led to a better understanding of diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s and type 2 diabetes, the prize committee said in its statement on Monday. “Ohsumi’s discoveries led to a new paradigm in our understanding of how the cell recycles its content,” it said....
Source: Mass Device - October 3, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Research & Development Source Type: news

Intoxicated Patient's Injury is More than Originally Suspected
It's near the end of a 24-hour shift when the call comes. EMS is dispatched to a residence for a 20-something-year-old male who's reportedly fallen at home while intoxicated and has facial trauma. His family was unable to get him into their private vehicle, so 9-1-1 is called for ambulance transport to the ED of the local rural hospital. At the scene, the patient is found lying supine on the floor, attended by family members. Upon entering the residence, blood is noted on the floor. The patient tracks the responders' movement with his eyes as he's approached. Figure 1: Location of patient's injuries He's responsive to ver...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seth A. Huntington, NREMT-P Tags: Trauma Patient Care Source Type: news

In America's drug death capital: How heroin is scarring the next generation
Heroin's shattering force hit Huntington, WV, in a span of 5 hours: 28 overdoses, 2 deaths. Here is the story of the day when "all hell broke loose." (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How heroin is scarring the next generation
Heroin's shattering force hit Huntington, WV, in a span of 5 hours: 28 overdoses, 2 deaths. Here is the story of the day when "all hell broke loose." (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In America's drug death capital, heroin is scarring the next generation
Sara Murray tends to two dozen babies in the neonatal therapeutic unit at Cabell Huntington Hospital. They shake. They vomit. Their inconsolable, high-pitched screams pierce the air. The symptoms can last for hours, days or months. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teva, Intel to develop wearable technology for Huntington's disease
(Reuters) - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd said on Thursday it was collaborating with Intel Corp to develop a wearable technology platform to track the progression of disease in patients with Huntington's, a fatal degenerative disorder. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Teva, Intel to develop wearables to monitor Huntington's disease
(Reuters) - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd said on Thursday it was collaborating with Intel Corp to develop a wearable device to monitor patients with Huntington's, a fatal degenerative disease. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

UCLA staff train residents for jobs testing for lead contamination in their neighborhoods
Staff at the UCLALabor Occupational Safety and Health Program (UCLA-LOSH) are training workers to take part in a multimillion-dollar cleanup of lead contamination at up to 10,000 properties in Los Angeles near the former Exide Technologies lead battery recycling facility in Vernon.For the first phase of this massive operation — taking soil samples at homes, schools, parks, daycare centers and small businesses located in seven southeastern L.A. County communities — UCLA-LOSH staff recently trained 30 people in two weeklong courses to handle hazardous waste safely.All 30 trainees were unemployed or under-employed...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 15, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Protein may protect nerve cells from Huntington's disease
Stephen FellerCLEVELAND, Sept. 14 (UPI) -- A novel peptide designed by researchers at Case Western Reserve University stopped Huntington's disease-like symptoms in mice, according to a recent study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BrainVectis receives funding to support gene therapy for Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease
Parisian-based BrainVectis, a spin-off of Inserm, has received €1m in funding from private investors, which will be used to complete preclinical pharmacological tests. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - September 13, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists develop therapeutic protein, protect nerve cells from Huntington's disease
Huntington's disease is an inherited genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes huntingtin protein. A new scientific study reveals one way to stop proteins from triggering an energy failure inside nerve cells during Huntington ’s disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine scientists develop therapeutic protein, protect nerve cells from Huntington ’ s Disease
(Case Western Reserve University) A new scientific study reveals one way to stop proteins from triggering an energy failure inside nerve cells during Huntington's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Activity of Huntington's disease gene curbed for six months in mice
A single injection of a new treatment has reduced the activity of the gene responsible for Huntington's disease for several months in a trial in mice. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Activity of Huntington's disease gene curbed for 6 months in mice
(Imperial College London) A single injection of a new treatment has reduced the activity of the gene responsible for Huntington's disease for several months in a trial in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Can some types of fat protect us from brain disease?
Having a little bit of extra fat may help reduce the risk of developing diseases caused by toxic protein aggregation, such as Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Scientists have discovered a new communication process between organelles inside the cell, including mitochondria, and shown how fat metabolism plays a central role in linking mitochondrial health to cytosolic protein homeostasis. Another study uncovers a new signaling pathway that may explain the peripheral wasting seen in Huntington's. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Opioid Epidemic Greatly Exaggerated?
Last week, when Michael Walker of Beckley, West Virginia, read in his local paper that high-potency heroin--or opioids sold as or cut with heroin--caused an outbreak of 27 overdoses in just four hours in the nearby city of Huntington, he thought of his 19-year-old son, Matthew, who has been off of opiates for three months, the longest he's been without the drug in years."I know it's early for Matthew, and what a struggle it still is," said Walker, 42, a white working-class dad. "A lot of people call this a problem, but it's an epidemic," he said, while describing the situation in West Virginia.West Virg...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news