Genetic diagnosis can rule out a suspected Huntington's chorea patient
(Neural Regeneration Research) Huntington's disease is an autosomal-dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease with a distinct phenotype, but the pathogenesis is unclear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 5, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA scientists hunt down origin of Huntington's disease in the brain
The gene mutation that causes Huntington's disease appears in every cell in the body, yet it kills only two types of brain cells. Why? UCLA scientists used a unique approach to switch the gene off in individual brain regions and zero in on those that play a role in causing the disease in mice. Published in the April 28 online edition of the journal Nature Medicine, the research sheds light on where Huntington's starts in the brain. It also suggests new targets and routes for therapeutic drugs to slow the devastating disease, which strikes an estimated 35,000 Americans. "From Day One of conception, the mutant gene that...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 28, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Origin of Huntington's disease found in brain; insights to help deliver therapy
The gene mutation that causes Huntington’s disease appears in every cell in the body, yet kills only two types of brain cells. Why? Scientists used a unique approach to switch the gene off in individual brain regions and zero in on those that play a role in causing the disease in mice. Their findings shed light on where Huntington's starts in the brain. It also suggests new targets and routes for therapeutic drugs to slow the devastating disease, which strikes an estimated 35,000 Americans. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 28, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Finding safe drugs to treat neurodegenerative diseases
'Mutant' protein clusters, long blamed for the progression of Huntington's and other neurodegenerative diseases, have been the primary focus of therapies in development by pharmaceutical companies. But according to new research, these drugs may not only be ineffective -- they may pose a serious threat to patients. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 23, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

On the defensive
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) 'Mutant' protein clusters, long blamed for the progression of Huntington's and other neurodegenerative diseases, have been the primary focus of therapies in development by pharmaceutical companies. But according to new research from Tel Aviv University, these drugs may not only be ineffective -- they may pose a serious threat to patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds long-term survival of human neural stem cells transplanted into primate brain
(Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair) Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were followed by MRI after transplantation into the brains of primates. The study evaluated the long-term survival and differentiation of hNSCs. The hNSCs differentiated into neurons at 24 months and did not cause tumors. Researchers concluded that hNSCs could be of great value as a source for cell replacement and gene transfer for treating Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, ALS, spinal cord injury and stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NeuroPhage discovers GAIM-changing molecules to combat Alzheimer's and related diseases
(MacDougall Biomedical Communications, Inc.) Researchers from NeuroPhage Pharmaceuticals, Inc. have engineered a series of molecules based on the discovery of GAIM which have the potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by misfolded proteins, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Research was published today in the Journal of Molecular Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 22, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Physicists push new Parkinson's treatment toward clinical trials
The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing. Research shows that a small 'molecular tweezer' keeps proteins from clumping, or aggregating, the first step of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 21, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

MSU physicists push new Parkinson's treatment toward clinical trials
(Michigan State University) The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing. Research at Michigan State University, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a small 'molecular tweezer' keeps proteins from clumping, or aggregating, the first step of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Boulder, Colo., Residents Still Least Likely to Be Obese
Boulder, Colo., continues to have the lowest obesity rate in the nation, at 12.4%. Residents of Huntington-Ashland, W.Va.-Ky.-Ohio, were the most likely to be obese in 2012-2013, at 39.5%. (Source: RWJF News Digest - Childhood Obesity)
Source: RWJF News Digest - Childhood Obesity - April 4, 2014 Category: Eating Disorders and Weight Management Authors: Rebecca Rifkin Source Type: news

Tweaking potassium levels in brain could be a key to fighting Huntington's disease
By boosting the ability of a specific type of cell to absorb potassium in the brain, UCLA researchers were able to improve walking and prolong survival in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.   Their findings, published March 30 in the online edition of the journal Nature Neuroscience, could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans.   Huntington's disease is passed from parent to child through a mutation in the huntingtin gene. By killing brain cells called neurons, the disorder gradually deprives patients of their ability to walk, speak, sw...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 31, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Potassium in brain could be key to fighting Huntington's disease
By boosting the ability of a specific type of cell to absorb potassium in the brain, UCLA researchers were able to improve walking and prolong survival in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.   Their findings, published March 30 in the online edition of the journal Nature Neuroscience, could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans.   Huntington's disease is passed from parent to child through a mutation in the huntingtin gene. By killing brain cells called neurons, the disorder gradually deprives patients of their ability to walk, speak, swallo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 31, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New approach to Huntington's disease?
Tweaking a specific cell type’s ability to absorb potassium in the brain improved walking and prolonged survival in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease, reports a study. The discovery could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 30, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

A new approach to Huntington's disease?
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Tweaking a specific cell type's ability to absorb potassium in the brain improved walking and prolonged survival in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, reports a University of California Los Angeles study published Mar. 30 in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience. The discovery could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 30, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

South Huntington Honored with SGIM Quality and Practice Innovation Award
Brigham and Women’s Advanced Primary Care Associates, South Huntington was honored with the Society of General Internal Medicine Quality and Practice Innovation Award (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - March 18, 2014 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

South Huntington Honored with SGIM Quality and Practice Innovation Award
Brigham and Women ’s Advanced Primary Care Associates, South Huntington was honored with the Society of General Internal Medicine Quality and Practice Innovation Award (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - March 18, 2014 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

High-Dose Creatine Promising in Prodromal Huntington's High-Dose Creatine Promising in Prodromal Huntington's
A phase 2 study including patients at high risk for Huntington's disease, some of whom remain blinded to their genetic status, finds the nutritional supplement safe and tolerable and provides a hint at efficacy. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Serious adverse effects from single-use detergent sacs: Report from a U.S. statewide poison control system - Huntington S, Heppner J, Vohra R, Mallios R, Geller RJ.
This study aims to classify which typ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - March 9, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

'I smothered my son because I couldn't bear his suffering any more': Mother's despair after her son was ravaged by cruel genetic disease
Heather Pratten's son Nigel Goodman had Huntington's disease - a condition which had also killed his father. On his 42nd birthday, Nigel tried to take a heroin overdose, she told ITV's This Morning. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel therapeutic targets discovered for Huntington's disease
A study led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provides novel insight into the impact that genes may have on Huntington's disease (HD). The study, published online in PLOS Genetics, identified specific small segments of RNA (called micro RNA or miRNA) encoded in DNA in the human genome that are highly expressed in HD. Micro RNAs are important because they regulate the expression of genes. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Huntingtons Disease Source Type: news

Large-scale protein interaction network for Huntington's disease expands knowledge of disease pathology and therapeutic targets
Researchers at the Buck Institute have identified and categorized thousands of protein interactions involving huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington's disease (HD). To use an analogy of a human social network, the identified proteins are like "friends" and "friends of friends" of the HD protein. The network provides an invaluable resource for identifying targets to treat the disease and has been used to implicate a particular signaling pathway involved in cell motility. HD is an incurable, fatal, inherited neurological disorder that causes severe degeneration of the nervous system. (Source: ...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Huntingtons Disease Source Type: news

Novel therapeutic targets for Huntington's disease discovered
The impact that genes may have on Huntington's disease have been illuminated by a new, novel study. The study identified specific small segments of RNA (called micro RNA or miRNA) encoded in DNA in the human genome that are highly expressed in Huntington's disease. Micro RNAs are important because they regulate the expression of genes. The researchers showed that these miRNAs are present in higher quantities in patients with HD and may act as a mitigating factor in the neurologic decline associated with the disease, making them a possible therapeutic target. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 28, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Huntington proteins and their nasty 'social network'
(Buck Institute for Age Research) Researchers at the Buck Institute have identified and categorized thousands of protein interactions involving huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington's disease. To use an analogy of a human social network, the identified proteins are like 'friends' and 'friends of friends' of the Huntington's disease protein. The network provides an invaluable resource for identifying targets to treat the disease and has been used to implicate a particular signaling pathway involved in cell motility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

BUSM Study discovers novel therapeutic targets for Huntington's disease
(Boston University Medical Center) A study led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine provides novel insight into the impact that genes may have on Huntington's disease. The study, published online in PLOS Genetics, identified specific small segments of RNA (called micro RNA or miRNA) encoded in DNA in the human genome that are highly expressed in Huntington's disease. Micro RNAs are important because they regulate the expression of genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds 125,000 immigrant youth with 'Deferred Action' status may be eligible for Medi-Cal
University of California researchers have released two reports that indicate high need and potential for health coverage among undocumented teens and young adults in California. The findings trail a bill recently introduced in the state legislature that calls for health care coverage for all Californians regardless of their immigration status.   Up to 125,000 young immigrants are estimated to be Medi-Cal (the state’s Medicaid program) eligible under state policy, according to a new report, Realizing the Dream for Californians Eligible for DACA: Demographics and Health Coverage, released by the UC Berkeley Labor...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 27, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Success Of New Drug For Huntington's Disease Boosts Prana's Share Price
The price of shares in the Australian-based company Prana Biotechnology Ltd. jumped by about 31% after the announcement that its new drug, PBT2, gave an improvement in cognitive function in patients with Huntington's disease. (Source: Pharmaceutical Online News)
Source: Pharmaceutical Online News - February 21, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Omeros begins dosing in second Phase II study of OMS824 in Huntington's Disease
US-based clinical-stage biopharmaceutical firm Omeros has dosed the first patient in a second Phase II clinical trial of its phosphodiesterase 10 (PDE10) inhibitor OMS824, being developed for the treatment of schizophrenia, Huntington's disease (HD) … (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - February 21, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Huntington's disease: Hot on the trail of misfolded proteins' toxic modus operandi
Proteins are the workhorses of the cell, and their correctly folded three-dimensional structures are critical to cellular functions. Misfolded structures often fail to properly perform these vital jobs, leading to cellular stress and devastating neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. Researchers are now gaining a better understanding of the relationship between protein misfolding, aggregation and cell toxicity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 19, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Prana's Phase II Huntington's disease study meets primary endpoint
Australia-based Prana Biotechnology has reported that its Reach2HD Phase II clinical trial investigating PBT2 as a treatment for Huntington disease succeeded in meeting the primary endpoint of the study. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - February 19, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists identify new Huntington disease pathway
An international group of researchers has identified a major new pathway thought to be involved in the development of Huntington disease. (Source: Medical Research Council Press Releases)
Source: Medical Research Council Press Releases - February 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

On-road driving impairments in Huntington disease - Devos H, Nieuwboer A, Vandenberghe W, Tant M, De Weerdt W, Uc EY.
OBJECTIVE: To determine the driving skill impairments and underlying visual, motor, and cognitive deficits that lead to failure on road testing in manifest Huntington disease (HD). METHODS: Certified driving assessment experts scored performance on 13 ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 15, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Can a virtual brain replace lab rats?
(University of Waterloo) Testing the effects of drugs on a simulated brain could lead to breakthrough treatments for neurological disorders such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease. Researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada hope Spaun, the world's largest functioning model of the brain, will be used to test new drugs that lead to medical breakthroughs for brain disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 14, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Exon skipping prevents formation of toxic protein fragments in Huntington's disease
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) An innovative therapeutic strategy for reducing the levels of toxic protein fragments associated with Huntington's disease uses a new approach called exon skipping to remove the disease-causing component of the essential protein, huntingtin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Huntington disease prevention trial shows creatine safe, slows progression
The first clinical trial of a drug intended to delay the onset of symptoms of Huntington disease reveals that high-dose treatment with the nutritional supplement creatine was safe and well tolerated by most participants. In addition, neuroimaging showed a treatment-associated slowing of regional brain atrophy, evidence that creatine might slow the progression of presymptomatic disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 8, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Omeros' Huntington's drug OMS824 gets FDA fast-track status
Omeros has received fast-track designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its phosphodiesterase 10 (PDE10) inhibitor 'OMS824' to treat cognitive impairment in patients with Huntington's disease. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - February 7, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Huntington disease prevention trial shows creatine safe, suggests slowing of progression
(Massachusetts General Hospital) The first clinical trial of a drug intended to delay the onset of symptoms of Huntington disease reveals that high-dose treatment with the nutritional supplement creatine was safe and well tolerated by most participants. In addition, neuroimaging showed a treatment-associated slowing of regional brain atrophy, evidence that creatine might slow the progression of presymptomatic disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Huntington Internal Medicine Group (HIMG) Celebrates Grand Opening of...
PharmaPoint is pleased to announce that The Pharmacy @ HIMG will open in Huntington Internal Medicine Group (HIMG) today.(PRWeb January 08, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/01/prweb11469232.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 11, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Therapeutic Target for Huntington's and Parkinson's Disease
Stephen Ferguson, PhD, a scientist at Western's Robarts Research Institute, and Fabiola Ribeiro, PhD, of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Brazil found a definite improvement in motor behaviors in a HD mouse model when one of the major neurotransmitters in the brain, called Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGluR5) was deleted. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - January 8, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Huntington Ingalls Industries Acquires The S.M. Stoller Corporation
(Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE))
Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE) - January 2, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Gene found that 'protects against neurodegenerative diseases'
Scientists from the University of Queensland in Australia say they have discovered that a gene called mec-17 has the ability to protect against adult-onset progressive nerve degeneration. This is according to a study published in the journal Cell Reports.The research team, led by Dr. Brent Neumann of the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) at the University of Queensland, say their discovery may one day lead to a cure for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, such as motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

The Opportunity to Make a Difference: Caring for Patients and Families...
Christopher G. Young, Vice President of HD Reach, discusses the opportunity to make a difference, caring for patients and families with Huntington's Disease.(PRWeb December 24, 2013)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/12/prweb11446213.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - December 24, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Staying ahead of Huntington's disease
Huntington's disease is a devastating, incurable disorder that results from the death of certain neurons in the brain. Its symptoms show as progressive changes in behavior and movements.The neurodegenerative disease is caused by a defect in the huntingtin gene (Htt) that causes an abnormal expansion in a part of DNA, called a CAG codon or triplet that codes for the amino acid glutamine. A healthy version of the Htt gene has between 20 and 23 CAG triplets. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Huntingtons Disease Source Type: news

PHOTO RELEASE -- Huntington Ingalls Industries Announces Irwin F. Edenzon's Retirement as Ingalls Shipbuilding's President and Related Promotion of Brian Cuccias as President, Ingalls Shipbuilding
(Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE))
Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE) - December 13, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Staying ahead of Huntington's disease
(Washington University in St. Louis) Rohit Pappu, Ph.D., and his colleagues are working to stay ahead of Huntington's disease, a devastating, incurable disorder that results from the death of certain neurons in the brain (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Drug reduces brain changes, motor deficits associated with Huntington's disease
A drug that acts like a growth-promoting protein in the brain reduces degeneration and motor deficits associated with Huntington's disease in two mouse models of the disorder, according to a study appearing in the Journal of Neuroscience. The findings add to a growing body of evidence that protecting or boosting neurotrophins - the molecules that support the survival and function of nerve cells - may slow the progression of Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Huntingtons Disease Source Type: news

International Huntington's Disease Symposium in Charlotte, NC...
The Huntington Study Group Symposium in Charlotte, NC ends with optimism and resolve in the battle against Huntington's disease.(PRWeb November 21, 2013)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11352764.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - November 23, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Parasitology III: Malaria - sanitized slides (Mark Huntington MD, PhD)
(Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded)
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - October 22, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Parasitology II: Vector-borne - sanitized slides (Mark Huntington MD, PhD)
(Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded)
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - October 22, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Parasitology I: GI parasites - sanitized slides (Mark K Huntington MD, PhD)
(Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded)
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - October 22, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases impacted by new discovery
A research team, headed by Theodore Friedmann, MD, professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, says a gene mutation that causes a rare but devastating neurological disorder known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome appears to offer clues to the developmental and neuronal defects found in other, diverse neurological disorders like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news